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Delirium

Delirium

Written by Lauren Oliver

Narrated by Sarah Drew


Delirium

Written by Lauren Oliver

Narrated by Sarah Drew

ratings:
4/5 (436 ratings)
Length:
11 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780062012524
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

The first book in Lauren Oliver’s remarkable New York Times bestselling trilogy about forbidden love, revolution, and the power to choose.

In an alternate United States, love has been declared a dangerous disease, and the government forces everyone who reaches eighteen to have a procedure called the Cure. Living with her aunt, uncle, and cousins in Portland, Maine, Lena Haloway is very much looking forward to being cured and living a safe, predictable life. She watched love destroy her mother and isn’t about to make the same mistake.

With ninety-five days left until her treatment, Lena meets enigmatic Alex, a boy from the Wilds who lives under the government’s radar. What will happen if they do the unthinkable and fall in love?

 

Publisher:
Released:
Feb 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780062012524
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Lauren Oliver is the cofounder of media and content development company Glasstown Entertainment, where she serves as the President of Production. She is also the New York Times bestselling author of the YA novels Replica, Vanishing Girls, Panic, and the Delirium trilogy: Delirium, Pandemonium, and Requiem, which have been translated into more than thirty languages. The film rights to both Replica and Lauren's bestselling first novel, Before I Fall, were acquired by Awesomeness Films. Before I Fall was adapted into a major motion picture starring Zoey Deutch. It debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in 2017, garnering a wide release from Open Road Films that year. Oliver is a 2012 E. B. White Read-Aloud Award nominee for her middle-grade novel Liesl & Po, as well as author of the middle-grade fantasy novel The Spindlers and The Curiosity House series, co-written with H.C. Chester. She has written one novel for adults, Rooms. Oliver co-founded Glasstown Entertainment with poet and author Lexa Hillyer. Since 2010, the company has developed and sold more than fifty-five novels for adults, young adults, and middle-grade readers. Some of its recent titles include the New York Times bestseller Everless, by Sara Holland; the critically acclaimed Bonfire, authored by the actress Krysten Ritter; and The Hunger by Alma Katsu, which received multiple starred reviews and was praised by Stephen King as “disturbing, hard to put down” and “not recommended…after dark.” Oliver is a narrative consultant for Illumination Entertainment and is writing features and TV shows for a number of production companies and studios. Oliver received an academic scholarship to the University of Chicago, where she was elected Phi Beta Kappa. She received a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from New York University. www.laurenoliverbooks.com.

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What people think about Delirium

4.2
436 ratings / 339 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    The Little BookwormLove is a disease and in Lena's society it is curable. After your eighteenth birthday each person has the surgery that destroys the emotion of love, of caring. Lena has never questioned the necessity of the surgery nor ever contemplated falling in love, that is, until she meets Alex.A society where love is outlawed and thought of as a disease? Well, that got my attention. That is a concept that would be very difficult to pull off. Love is such an integral part of who we are and how we interact with others. Children need love and if their parents were incapable of it, how would that affect them? Love is what gets most people by. Delirium doesn't really seek to answer all the questions or explore the repercussions directly. Instead it shows what a society where the adults are apathetic looks like, how people think. And it shows how all of that can change in one person through the protagonist, Lena. Lena is desperate to have the surgery thinking it will end all her problems. But, of course, she meets a boy who changes all of that.A surgery at a certain milestone, 18 in this book, to make the person conform to societal standards is so reminiscent of Uglies. There were actually quite a few elements that reminded me of Uglies. I also got a Romeo and Juliet type vibe, probably purposely as the play is mentioned quite a few times. And while I enjoyed Delirium and found it to be a quick read I wasn't really emotionally invested in the characters. I think that is just a by-product of having a character live in an emotionally closed off society. Despite the romantic that actually felt realistic and took place at a normal pace, unlike some YA books, I didn't really feel attached. But I enjoyed the book overall I just think this is either going to be a love it or a meh type of book. Posted on Goodreads and Library Thing as well
  • (4/5)
    Lena’s mom and dad died when she was young, so Lena was raised by her aunt. Lena’s 18th birthday is coming up soon, and it will be such a relief to be able to have the surgery done – the cure! – to prevent the sickness “amor deliria nervosa” (aka love). Everyone gets the cure on their 18th birthday. She’ll be matched with someone to marry and her life will be perfect. But, before her birthday (and the surgery) arrives, she meets Alex…I really liked this. It seems an odd premise, but I went with it, and quite enjoyed it. I liked Lena’s best friend, Hana, and her young cousin(?), Grace, although a bit more interaction with Grace might have been nice. Maybe one of the upcoming books in the series will have more about her? I will definitely be continuing.
  • (4/5)
    This is a great trilogy. It's the future and when someone turns 18 they are given a shot to get rid of the delirium. The delirium is when people fall in love and they get infected with the delirium. It's considered people can't control their emotions. People are closely monitored. Boys and girls go to separate schools and are not supposed to be in contact until they have had the solution. If you are caught doing something you shouldn't, if you are found as a resistant or a sympathizer, you are placed in the crypt or killed right away. Very good trilogy. I can't wait to find out what happens to Lena, Hana and Alex.
  • (5/5)
    Find this review and more at On The Shelf!This is a wonderfully fresh kind of book to read. This is an idea I have never seen before and couldn’t wait to read. Love a disease? Immensely original! The world in this book is so ugly; people who are cured make it seem so great, and for a long time Lena thought it was great, too, until she learned the truth and saw how ugly the world she lived in was.The author does such a great job with her words. The descriptions are fantastic and the reader for the audiobook version I listened to did an absolutely wonderful job bringing the book to life as she performed it. I loved how Lena changed so much from the beginning to the end. She was so much different by the end of the book; love certainly does change you. I would have liked to have seen a bit more from Alex, though. For some reason I didn’t connect with him as well. He just wasn’t the dreamy book boyfriend I was hoping he would turn out to be.I’m not crazy about people on the covers of my books, but this one was a great cover and I loved the colors, which make me think of spring. I like the cover for Pandemonium even more and it reminds me of the fall. There was a couple of twists in the story, and I can’t wait to see the outcome of them! The writing of this novel swallows you up and keep you glued to the same place for a while and you feel so much emotion right alongside Lena. My heart hurt at so many points in this book and others made me angry and others made me smile. It was up, down, up, down.Rollercoaster of feelings, wonderful description, unique plot, didn’t connect to the main male character.
  • (4/5)
    In the future love is a disease and everyone over eighteen is inoculated for it. This means that interactions between people aren’t overly intimate, there are patrols that are alert for anyone dancing around, playing music loudly, or generally displaying any passion for anything at all. Delirium uses this interesting concept to tell the heartwarming story of Lena, who lives by her society’s warped rules until an encounter with the mysterious Alex, coupled with her best friend Hana’s strange behaviour, makes her question everything she’s ever believed in.I like Delirium - I like with the characters and think it is a well paced, enjoyable read. The romance between Lena and Alex is sweet, with her learning to trust him slowly. I also really like Hana, who is spunky and funny and, most importantly, has a life that doesn’t revolve around Lena. I wish there had been more exploration of Hana’s journey and that Lena hadn’t lost touch with her for such a large chunk of the book.The only issue I have with it is a small one - Lena agrees to meet Alex at an isolated beach after curfew, all alone, after a lifetime of being taught (and believing) that boys and girls need to be segregated for their own safety. It doesn’t make sense for her to meet him so willingly (just because he’s so hot and she can’t resist) - especially since some time later it doesn’t even occur to her that the illegal concert she attends with Hana would be co-ed until she arrives. I would have much preferred Lena’s awakening to the injustices of her world to have occurred with Hana as the catalyst, rather than Alex, but maybe this is me trying to instil some independence into YA heroines.A cool dystopian story that I regret allowing to gather dust on my shelves, Delirium will be enjoyed by those who like young adult novels. I am glad I let this book alone until I had its sequel, Pandemonium, in my hands though - I’m reading it right now and I love it. The final book in the trilogy, Requiem, will be released in 2013, but there is a novella out that tells Hana’s story more clearly.You can read more of my reviews at Speculating on SpecFic.
  • (4/5)
    Review also posted at The Wandering Fangirl.When you read a lot of a certain genre, you start to suss out the familiar tropes and themes that crop up in every novel. In the latest crop of dystopian YA that's popped up since The Hunger Games, it's been easy: young girl in a dystopian future, a populace that's brainwashed somehow, girl looking forward to whatever landmark she's about to hit, boy shows up, romance and having her eyes opened to the horrors of the world around her ensue. Sometimes a good boy/bad boy triangle pops up. Sometimes, books like Delirium come along, and while it does deal in many of the familiar themes, it does so in a way that feels a little fresher, a little different from the rest of them.The fact that the entire novel is based on a romance threw me off at first, but it's the development of it that really hooked me and kept me reading. Yes, it's because of a guy that Lena starts to wake up to everything around her, but the emotional growth she experiences as the book progresses is lovely to watch, something a lot of dystopian romance novels miss when trying to hit their plot points along the way.I think I'm mostly just glad there isn't a damn love triangle.
  • (4/5)
    The premise: ganked from the author's website: Before scientists found the cure, people thought love was a good thing. They didn't understand that once love--the deliria--blooms in your blood, there is no escaping its hold.Things are different now. Scientists are able to eradicate love, and the government demands that all citizens receive the cure upon turning eighteen. Lena Haloway has always looked forward to the day when she'll be cured. A life without love is a life without pain: safe, measured, predictable, and happy.But with ninety-five days left until her treatment, Lena does the unthinkable: she falls in love.My Rating: Worth Reading, with ReservationsReservation: if you're having dystopia burn-out, it's probably best to save this for later, because the influences are of Orwell, Lowry, and Westerfeld are obvious, and while it's a completely different story, the similarities to Matched might be too close for comfort (please note these books were published about the same time, and I personally think Delirium is more engaging than Matched); also, this isn't a fast-paced book, it's a lazy, slow summer read and enjoyable for it, but that's not everyone's cup of tea.I enjoyed myself, surprisingly. I've been rather apathetic about YA lately, and I'm getting harder and harder to please. This was enjoyable because I bought into the premise so completely and thoroughly. I wish Oliver had gone further, but what I envision is beyond anything Oliver wanted to do, so maybe I should just go write my own science fiction novel. At any rate, the romance here is sweet and there IS NO TRIANGLE (though it's a trilogy, so there's time for one), and I found myself really invested in Lena simply because of her past and how her mother's history relates to Lena's current actions. It's an enjoyable book, and I'm tempted to get the sequel.Spoilers, yay or nay?: Yay. Not only do I want to talk about the pros and cons of this particular book, but I want to compare it some to Condie's Matched and Lowry's The Giver and talk about the difference between influence and borrowing. The full review is in my blog, which is linked below. As always, comments and discussion are most welcome.REVIEW: Lauren Oliver's DELIRIUMHappy Reading!
  • (5/5)
    Let me just say YA Dystopia is fast becoming my favorite genre to read. I had previously read a couple of reviews of Delirium, and was a little skeptical at first, although the reviews were of course glowing. I read the first couple of chapters and was hooked.
    Lena is so easy to connect to for me. Her friendship with Hana, and her upset over her mother's "death" are easily identifiable. Delirium introduces us to a world where LOVE is a disease, and at a certain age everyone must have a procedure to be "cured". The book was a little slow for me, but I couldn't give up on it, once Alex; in all his gloriousness was introduced I knew that i was in for an epic love story.
    I teared up when I learned that he was technically an "invalid" and when Lena ran from him I was heartbroken. I had to keep reading to find out if she went looking for him. The chapter where she went searching for him was a nail bitter for me, until she found him, and then of course I was in love with him even more from that moment on.
    When Lena finds out that her mother may be alive, I was almost as nervous as her, that is until they arrive at the "Crypts". I just knew that something was wrong. But hopefully there is a happy ending with that story.
    After Lena is busted and almost forced to have the procedure to cure her of Amor Deliria Nervousa ( what they call the disease love), I was praying and screaming at the book for Alex to show up and rescue her.
    The ending of the book had me crying, actually I was crying throughout the last two chapters. I am hoping that the next book of this projected trilogy is out soon, and that Alex will be in the next one.
    Overall, I loved the book, the characters and Lauren Oliver's writing style. This is one book that I will pick up often.
  • (5/5)
    This was way better than I thought it would be.

    Mama, Mama, help me get home
    I'm out in the woods, I am out on my own.
    I found me a werewolf, a nasty old mutt
    It showed me its teeth and went straight for my gut.

    Mama, Mama, help me get home
    I'm out in the woods, I am out on my own.
    I was stopped by a vampire, a rotting old wreck
    It showed me its teeth and went straight for my neck.

    Mama, Mama, put me to bed
    I won't make it home, I'm already half-dead.
    I met an Invalid, and fell for his art
    He showed me his smile, and went straight for my heart.

    -From "A Child's Walk Home," Nursery Rhymes and Folk Tales
    So, this is for all intents and purposes the same idea and some of the same plot as Scott Westerfeld's Uglies, and yet it somehow utilized that same idea and plot to make something much more profound and frankly more coherent. This book has actual motifs and themes. I adored the writing style and loved all the characters (though Hana was mostly annoying and Alex was sort of a stalker). I liked how the worldbuilding was done. I liked just about everything about this. It surpassed all of my expectations.
  • (4/5)
    I only just finished this book earlier this year, after its been on my stack of books to read for the past two years or so and I wish I had read it sooner. I saw the book a couple of times in the bookstore and I finally bought it because the concept sounded interesting. The book sucked me in and I finished it in 3 days (I'm a college student and had school or I would have stayed up all night to finish). With the Hunger Games and the Divergent series, dystopian novels have been gaining popularity and with Delirium being a part of the genre, while sounding interesting, I thought would be an easy, distracting, read when I needed a break from all the school work. I was wrong this book is fantastic!!!

    The world that Lena lives in, a world without love, was a believable world. The excerpts from the beginning of each chapter from the Book of Shhh helped in making the world seem more real. The first book in the series did a great job of introducing us to this world and showing the reader how much not having love can destroy us. With Lena she is about to have the surgery to remove the disease of love -- the Deliria Nervosa -- but she ends up falling in love with a boy named Alex. Lauren Oliver writes about a love story between two teenagers, and thankfully, it's not cheesy either. But my favorite part about the whole not having love is how it also effects the family. Lena's mom committed suicide because she couldn't have love which resulted in Lena having to be raised my her aunt and uncle. Throughout the novel, while Lena's family thinks what they are doing is right, they are not doing it out of love but out of what the government tells them is right. Don't even get me started on the ending, all I can say is amazing cliff hanger!!!

    4/5
  • (5/5)
    Lauren Oliver has a wonderful way with words. Her characters in Delirium were deep and well developed and I enjoyed watching them, particularly Lena, grow and learn and change. She creates a deep and fascinating world that looks at how different people would be without love. I also really enjoyed how she pulls you into her story by using beautiful, lyrical prose.One of the things I really liked about this book was that it had an interesting way of combining religion and science and portraying elements from both of these to explain why the people in this story think the way they think. Oliver took parts of religion and science and showed how people in this society twisted them in order to believe that love was a disease. She does it so well that you can really understand why they believe this. Oliver did a wonderful job of scene building and providing examples to explain the world she created. She makes it believable that it could exist, that it could be the world we live in some day. Part of what helped me believe in this world was the quotes at the beginning of the chapters and little phrases that Oliver created. They added a lot to the story and I greatly enjoyed them. I also loved how Oliver not only looked at romantic love but love between parents and their children and love between friends, and how these relationships change and even fall apart without love. The main character, Lena, goes on a journey of discovery in Delirium. She has to grow as a person to be able to see through to the truth. I enjoyed reading about her journey which started with her fully believing in the ways of her society and government. She accepted that people were cured of love when they turned 18 and the fact that your spouse was essentially chosen for you, she even appreciated these things. Then she started to learn about things that she never knew existed. She started to open her eyes up to all the things she was never supposed to know about. Watching her discover things like music, and love were wonderful and I believed every one of her reactions. All of the characters in this story were well written. I loved Alex and his relationship with Lena. I loved the way they grew together and that he had a reason for being drawn to her. Alex and Lena truly fell in love, this is not a ‘we love each other for no reason’ kind of story and I really appreciated that. I also loved Hana. At first I thought she was going to be somewhat stereotypical of a character, she’s beautiful and popular and perfect, but there was so much more to Hana.Every part of this book was well done and I look forward to reading more of this series and more from Lauren Oliver.
  • (4/5)
    As an adult, I enjoyed this book even though it is meant for teens. It was an interesting and engaging plot with a lot of tension. I also found Lena to be a well-developed and relatable protagonist. There was a romantic subplot that I found to be appropriate for my 12 year old. I would definitely read more in the series.
  • (4/5)
    Another apocalyptic story. This time, however, the U.S. has been divided into the Wilds and the Civilized places. Invalids (say in-VAL-ids) because everyone has a validation number. Love is also a disease and everyone receives the Cure at 18. Lena can hardly wait for her procedure. But by the end, she refuses to become another unfeeling, living in a trance member of the population in Portland, ME. Quick read, lovely descriptions of earl y love (not sexually explicit). Want to read the other parts if the trilogy.
  • (5/5)
    i loved this book. i did not wantto read itand put off doing so fora long time. I didn't see how a society that revoves around controlling love would seem realistic, but it works.
  • (4/5)
    Wow. Just.... wow. Amazing. Breathtaking. When is the next one coming out? I don't think I can wait.
  • (4/5)
    Perhaps the best description of the physical sensation of falling in love that I've ever read. What a great book.
  • (4/5)
    Pretty good story

    Enjoyed it
  • (4/5)
    So, I'm giving this 3.5 stars because I really hated the ending. The dystopian world I thought was good but, seriously, we went through entire book for that. NOW I just found out there are sequels so maybe I won't be so annoyed. Ms. Oliver's writing is fast moving at times and tedious at times. I, honestly, can't picture any of the characters BUT the scenes move quickly so I will more than likely check out book .
  • (2/5)
    i thought it was gonna be good and interesting and whatnot but it wasn't it was confusing and the girl was annoying
  • (5/5)
    Good book!
  • (4/5)
    Delirium provides a glimpse into what life would be like if we lived in a world without love. The government has perfected a cure for the disease of love, claiming it causes recklessness, insanity and ultimately death. Is their claim true? The heroine of the story, Lena, certainly believes so, especially after her mother kills herself for love. I must admit that at first I did not like Lena, she was too unsure of herself and too timid for my taste, I prefered reading about her friend Hana who seemed much more vibrant and alive. After Lena meets Alex her personality starts to shine through and I found myself liking her more and more. I still think she has much room to grow and luckily there are two more installments of the series for her to grow in. I thought the other characters were well done, especially Alex and Hana, and I was very intrigued by Grace and I hope she makes an appearance elsewhere in the series. The ending of the story broke my heart and I look forward to seeing where Lena will go from here. I should note that I received my review copy from the publisher through NetGalley.
  • (5/5)
    OMG. Fantastic. Lauren Oliver is an incredible writer. Complete review to come.
  • (4/5)
    A great read
  • (1/5)
    Couldn't finish it. Stock characters, overwrought plot, unconvincing.
  • (5/5)
    It was really good.
  • (4/5)
    As a Youth Services librarian, I deal with many YA books and read lots of book reviews. I tend to read more against current trends, figuring that the popular books will always find their way into the hands of readers. Even now, when I am SO over dystopian novels, I'm very glad I read this one. Lauren Oliver draws you in with a great first sentence and gives you a very sympathetic narrator. It's chilling and tender, and I will be recommending Delirium to any teens who have not yet read it.
  • (3/5)
    i enjoyed it, though it made me really sad... should have figured it might - a world where love is a curable disease. oi. glad I don't live there!
  • (5/5)
    Well written, fast paced and characters that hooked me from the start. I particularly liked the growth arc for Lena, her flaws and her bravery. It'll be interesting to see where she goes next!

    Will definitely read on in the series.
  • (5/5)
    Wow!! The concept of this book blows my mind. Lauren Oliver's imagination is amazing! She used way to many analogies, she was always comparing one thing to another. But that being said I loved it!!! It was different and interesting and I was holding my breath for the last couple of pages. I can't wait to read the rest of the trilogy!
  • (3/5)
    This was a really well done novel. I enjoyed the very realistic, alternate current history setting. I came to care for the characters (which is crucial to me) and there were enough cliffhangers to entice me to read the rest of the trilogy... sometime.