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The Edgar Allan Poe Audio Collection

The Edgar Allan Poe Audio Collection

Written by Edgar Allan Poe

Narrated by Vincent Price and Basil Rathbone


The Edgar Allan Poe Audio Collection

Written by Edgar Allan Poe

Narrated by Vincent Price and Basil Rathbone

ratings:
3.5/5 (13 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Dec 27, 2003
ISBN:
9780060742706
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Universally acclaimed as the maestro of horror and the morbid, Edgar Allan Poe's dark gift has for more than a century and a half set the standard for the genre.

Now, Caedmon Audio presents a classic collection of Poe's most terrifying tales performed by two of the most brilliant interpreters of his work, Vincent Price and Basil Rathbone. Between them, they perform 20 of Poe's chilling stories and poems, creating an unforgettably intense listening experience.

Includes:
• The Gold Bug
• The Imp of the Perverse
• Ligeia Performed by Vincent Price
• The Tell-Tale Heart
• The Pit and the Pendulum
• The Raven Performed by Basil Rathbone
Publisher:
Released:
Dec 27, 2003
ISBN:
9780060742706
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was an American poet, short story writer, and editor. Born in Boston to a family of actors, Poe was abandoned by his father in 1810 before being made an orphan with the death of his mother the following year. Raised in Richmond, Virginia by the Allan family of merchants, Poe struggled with gambling addiction and frequently fought with his foster parents over debts. He attended the University of Virginia for a year before withdrawing due to a lack of funds, enlisting in the U.S. Army in 1827. That same year, Poe anonymously published Tamerlane and Other Poems, his first collection. After failing to graduate from West Point, Poe began working for several literary journals as a critic and editor, moving from Richmond to Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York. In 1836, he obtained a special license to marry Virginia Clemm, his 13-year-old cousin, who moved with him as he pursued his career in publishing. In 1838, Poe published The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, a tale of a stowaway on a whaling ship and his only novel. In 1842, Virginia began showing signs of consumption, and her progressively worsening illness drove Poe into deep depression and alcohol addiction. “The Raven” (1845) appeared in the Evening Mirror on January 29th. It was an instant success, propelling Poe to the forefront of the American literary scene and earning him a reputation as a leading Romantic. Following Virginia’s death in 1847, Poe became despondent, overwhelmed with grief and burdened with insurmountable debt. Suffering from worsening mental and physical illnesses, Poe was found on the streets of Baltimore in 1849 and died only days later. He is now recognized as a literary pioneer who made important strides in developing techniques essential to horror, detective, and science fiction.

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Reviews

What people think about The Edgar Allan Poe Audio Collection

3.7
13 ratings / 7 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (2/5)
    I've read two stories from this collection for the 1001 books to read before you die list. The first one "The Purloined Letter" sucked. I DNF because it was so boring and really too much information to get through just to find out how he got his hands on the letter. However, the second story "The Fall of the House of Usher" was more of the Poe writing that I enjoy. It's about a haunted house with a poor man who is going crazy inside it. Ending was strange and left it to the reader's imagination what happened to Usher.
  • (5/5)
    I'd never read Poe before when I bought this book. I usually hate florid writing (basically, anything before the late 19th century) and a quick glance at the prose made me a little worried about whether I would even be able to make sense of it. However, I persevered and now I've finished all the stories and am sad cause I know there's no more to read.Poe understands horror and suspense to perfection. He also understands a lot of other things which nobody seems to appreciate anymore, IMO. Some of the more surreal stories in this collection reminded me strongly of Gogol. I'm not really a fan of surreal writing, but many of the other stories - especially the 'futuristic technology' ones - reminded me of some of Conan Doyle's stories, which is some of the highest praise I could give an author.In particular, I'm indebted to Poe for inspiring Conan Doyles's Sherlock Holmes, one of my favorite literary protagonists of all time. I actually think the Sherlock Holmes stories are better developed than Poe's detective tales, but one can forgive him since he pioneered the detective genre.My favorite story, by far, was 'Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym'. I love a good adventure story, and this was an epic that just went on and on and oooon....in a very good way. It also showed how incredibly educated the author was on everything from the breedings habits of sea-birds to handling a ship. I learnt so much about random subjects from this story.I was going to try to list some of my other favorites, but there are just too many so I'm leaving it at this.
  • (5/5)
    Loved the readings by Vincent Price and Basil Rathbone!
  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    The Balloon-Hoax - Wow. That was really boring.Ms. Found in a Bottle - Good suspense, but the ending confused me.A Descent into the Maelstrom - Not too memorable.The Murders in the Rue Morgue - A rather silly Holmes-esque mystery tale.The Purloined Letter - Not bad, but far too wordy.The Black Cat - Deliciously disturbing.The Fall of the House of Usher - Not as interesting as his others, but good atmosphere.The Pit and the Pendulum - A delightful tale of suspense.The Masque of the Red Death - Meh. Weird for no reason and kind of boring.The Cask of Amontillado - I think makes Poe so memorable is his vivid first-person accounts from the point of view of a killer.The Assignation - I couldn't follow this one. What did the drowning child and the art aficionado have to do with one another?The Tell-Tale Heart - Funnier than I'd remembered. One of my all-time favorites.Diddling - A random essay on swindling.The Man That was Used Up - Silly, amusing, but ends a bit too abruptly.Narrative of A. Gordon Pym - Some good bits, but I think I just don't like maritime fiction.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    This is very thrilling story.I was interested in his book because Japanese famous writer Ranpo Edogawa is made by changing Edgar Allan Poe.The story is nice.But a little dreadful
  • (5/5)
    My first collection of the maestro's work. Inexorably moody.
  • (3/5)
    Edgar Allan Poe was the inventor of the thriller and made an very chilling work of his story "The Fall of the House of Usher". Being my favorite work of his besides "The Raven", I would recommend it to anyone. However, his stories all together are a bit too grim and gruesome for my taste.