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The Body in the Library: A Miss Marple Mystery

The Body in the Library: A Miss Marple Mystery

Written by Agatha Christie

Narrated by Stephanie Cole


The Body in the Library: A Miss Marple Mystery

Written by Agatha Christie

Narrated by Stephanie Cole

ratings:
4/5 (84 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jul 3, 2012
ISBN:
9780062232281
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

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Also available as bookBook

Description

It's seven in the morning. The Bantrys wake to findthe body of a young woman in their library.She is wearing an evening dress and heavy makeup,which is now smeared across her cheeks. But whois she? How did she get there? And what is theconnection with another dead girl, whose charredremains are later discovered in an abandonedquarry? The respectable Bantrys invite Miss Marpleto solve the mystery . . . before tongues start to wag.

Publisher:
Released:
Jul 3, 2012
ISBN:
9780062232281
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Agatha Christie is known throughout the world as the Queen of Crime. Her books have sold over a billion copies. She is the author of eighty crime novels and short-story collections, nineteen plays and six novels written under the pseudonym Mary Westmacott.


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4.1
84 ratings / 41 Reviews
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  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this story. Even though Miss Marple was not present during the whole story I quite enjoyed the other characters. The Moving Finger is a mystery of who is writing these anonymous letters to the residents of a quiet little town called Lymstock and who murdered the maid. I enjoyed the interaction of the out of town guests on holiday Jerry and Joanna Burton, brother and sister.
  • (2/5)
    Jerry is sent to the countryside on doctor's orders after a flight accident. He arrives there with his sister for the rest and relaxation, but they quickly find a drama unfolding in the town. Someone is anonymously sending letters to people throughout the village accusing them of uncouth acts (e.g., cheating on a spouse). Things quickly escalate and soon the town is investigating murder.This has to be my least favorite of the Miss Marple series by Christie. For starters, I kept doubting myself as to whether I had gotten the wrong book, as Miss Marple doesn't show up until two-thirds of the way into the book! Even then, she is so few scenes, it's easy to forget about her. (Although, of course, she does end up unmasking the killer.) So much of the book is caught up in mundane descriptions of village life (e.g, how the town is laid out) before the action begins. I really did not care for any of the characters, least of all our narrator Jerry. In fact, Jerry skeeved me out quite a bit with his sudden romantic interest in Megan; although Megan is 20 years old, she is frequently referred to by everyone in town including Jerry himself as a "child." Jerry's own sister says he is only interested in Megan because he wants a "dog" to "lead about on its leash." In fact, the book seems to have rather negative views about women in general, with mentions of how hysterical, jealous, etc. women can be.The mystery itself was really not all that intriguing and its denouement was rather anticlimatic. Christie did manage to present a person I hadn't suspected as the murderer, but the rather mundane husband-kills-wife-so-he-can-be-with-another-woman reveal is much more tame than the scenario I was playing out in my head. Oh well. I suppose not every mystery can be a winner. After this doozy following on the heels of a previous 'eh' Miss Marple mystery, I'm not sure if I'm going to continue on with the series.
  • (4/5)
    Poison pen letters devastate idyllic Lymstock, but they’re only the beginning…

    "The Moving Finger" has some issues - Maurice Disher’s contemporary Times review points out some flaws with the narrator’s voice – but it’s perhaps Christie’s best examination of the sinister undercurrent in these tiny hamlets. The brutal poison pen letters with their filthy insinuations, the blackmail and murder, are at their peak here, with the duality perfectly conveyed through the arrival of our narrator and his sister – a London society couple – who struggle to interpret the difference between the sincere and malicious actions of their new neighbours, in a world with different social mores, hiding all sorts of dirty deeds.

    There’s a case to be made for Jane Marple as a fascinating detective – where her observational skills and taste for gossip can one-up the local constabulary – but much of the time she is a secondary figure in her own novels. The general technique of solving a Marple mystery – noticing the background inconsistencies in seemingly implacable facades of village elders – often means the mystery consists of a close reading of some blathering elderly folk. When it works, it works, but too often the Marple books come across as glacially paced. "The Moving Finger", though, is an example of all these elements working, and how.

    Later in life, Agatha Christie came to feel very comfortable with Miss Jane Marple (that’s the other factor in the relative decline of quality: Marple books were primarily written after WWII, and thus in Christie’s more patchy era). The best Marple books are those in which – shock horror! – Marple herself does some investigating, and the clues prepared for us are logical… if only we could read them. What makes Poirot stand out as a detective in crime fiction is that – in retrospect – we kick ourselves for not having been able to see what should have been blindingly obvious. Marple is in fine form here: her status as a hawk-eyed gossip makes her a wonderful amateur detective when used well, and this time the clues and facts – gathered by the narrator, the police and our spinster – all make sense. With a comparatively strong narrator, and a nice array of characters, the novel focuses on all the potential suspects while also maintaining atmosphere. Unlike "The Hollow", Marple’s late entry doesn’t damage things: if anything, it allows us to gather clues and then watch Marple figure things out in a far more breezy fashion than usual.

    "The Moving Finger" is a clear classic. There are only two flaws: the “ugly duckling” sequence is an unnecessary strain of melodrama (which also led to an embarrassing low point in the Joan Hickson adaptation ), and there is a curiously maligned gay dude. (Christie wrote a few touching lesbians in her time, but gay men seem to have failed her litmus test.) However, these are minor issues for a novel written when my grandparents were children. Great stuff.

    Marple ranking: 2nd out of 14
  • (5/5)
    Keep in mind that Miss Marple only appears at the very end of this book--and solves the mystery. Yet, this is an excellent story, and I love the characters. Another big hit from the Queen of Mystery!
  • (3/5)
    I’ve been working through all of Christie’s Miss Marple novels, going out of order until I had them all purchased. I’ve read five now, and this was the first one to really disappoint. Miss Marple may as well have not even appeared and there is very little mystery until more than half way through.Jerry Burton and his sister, Joanna, travel to Lymstock so that he can rest and recover after a bad accident. The sleepy little town is unnerved by anonymous letters being delivered to residents accusing them of various unsavory things. The letters turn deadly, however, when Mrs. Symmington commits suicide after receiving one. The police are called in to find the writer, helped by Jerry who has been getting to know all the residents, especially the young and naïve Megan - daughter of Mrs. Symmington. My problem was that the entire first half of the book was really nothing more than gossip, with the occasional reference to the letters. Jerry, with or without Joanna, visits every resident, multiple times, to chat and/or have tea. I was hoping for Peyton Place-like shenanigans, but it was just boring. Even when a person turns up outright murdered, I just didn't care (nor did most of the residents). Miss Marple doesn’t even enter the story until more than two thirds of the way through, and the way she “solves” the case is completely unsatisfying. She doesn’t “observe” and collect clues, or interview people, like in other mysteries. She has a conversation with Jerry, who tells her everything that has occurred, and she just knows who the writer is.The ending, and ultimate culprit, was a surprise (probably because we never really learn anything to point to any particular suspect), which is why I gave it 3 stars. Disappointing, but not enough to put me off reading more.
  • (4/5)

    Jerry Burton (a pilot recuperating) and his sister Joanna have let a house in the quiet village of Lymstock.... Soon they are victims of poison pen letters, as are most of their neighbors.

    When the mother of the odd & unwanted young Megan commits suicide and her maid is poisoned, the village is thrown into even more of a frenzy of accusations & suspicions...

    The vicar's wife, who with her acid tongue & pronouncements, is not above suspicion herself, calls in her friend Miss Marple to help solve the problems.

    Meanwhile Jerry not only takes a keen interest in Megan and is surprised find his interest to be romantic, but an even keener interest in solving the crimes.

    When Megan decides to blackmail her stepfather (at the behest of Miss Marple) the solution of the poison pen letters & the murder is solved.

    I liked the mystery, the plot, the romance, and the twists made for good reading, but I found Miss Marple's intervention too pat.
  • (3/5)
    Not her best.
  • (4/5)
    I am slowly rereading the Miss Marple books this year. This 3rd one barely qualifies as a Miss Marple as she doesn't make an appearance until about 80% of the way through. Of course, she quickly solves the case once she appears on the scene! It is almost as if Christie's publisher talked her into adding in a familiar sleuth rather than making it one of her stand-alone mysteries...Richard E. Grant is marvelous in his narration of the audiobook. I really appreciated all the different voices he did for the different characters!
  • (4/5)
    Miss Marple Win It All!This story is a little bit different when confronted with other Marple mysteries. Miss Marple and her incomparable wisdom appear late in the plot. With that said, one will experience another well designed puzzle with a lot of good ingredients: anonymous letters, murder, a lot of gossip, even romance. A well written tale presented in the first person by its main character.
  • (4/5)
    Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen is an enchanting little book. It is the story of two sisters, Claire and Sydney Waverly, who have been estranged for many years. Claire is living in the family home in Bascom, North Carolina, when Sydney arrives with her daughter Bay in tow. Sydney is running from Bay’s abusive father and has nowhere else to go. Claire, a caterer, has trouble getting close to people for fear they will leave.The Waverly’s have a reputation around town for being different. They possess special gifts. Bay has an uncanny ability to know where things belong, from forks to people. Evanelle, an elderly cousin, is compelled to give people things that they will need in the future; things that will alter the course of their lives (although she never knows how they will be used when she gives them). Claire’s gift is her very special culinary skills. She uses edible flowers and herbs from her garden in her cooking, which can make people remember or forget, fall in or out of love, and any number of other mystical things as she sees fit. Sydney is determined NOT to be special as only a Waverly can be, but soon it’s clear that she is gifted as well. And then there’s the Waverly apple tree, which has it’s own brand of magic.I was captivated by Garden Spells. It is romantic and sweet and the story flows nicely. I would recommend it to anyone who enjoys fantasy or magical fiction. Is magical fiction an actual genre? If not, it should be.
  • (2/5)
    This one was a disappointment. The earliest Miss Marple stories don't seem as good as the later ones, except-till now- 'The Body In The Library', which is very complex. I knew this should be a Miss Marple mystery but she doesn't appear throughout most of the book. For another thing, the story takes place in the village of Lymstock, so I kept wondering how Marple was to be brought into the picture. For a few moments I had thought that there must have been a mistake as there wasn't enough scope for Miss Marple to appear and shine.Apart from that the denouement of the mystery itself is a disappointment. The old habit of setting up the spouse as the engineer of all the evil in the book-including the murders-is vintage Agatha Christie. But here the mystery is not as intriguing and not as impossible as her finer work. One of the lesser tricks employed in the story was to make the reader believe that the guilty must be a woman; an embittered woman who may or may not be a lady. But that didn't wash with me. There were not many false clues lying about, as the story was told from the perspective of Jerry Burton.Jerry Burton marries Megan Symmington. His sister Joanna marries Owen Griffth. I kept up with this book better whenever Megan was being described...what she wore, how she had a horse face...how childish her words were, how, when she cried, she rather bawled. She was crucial to my enjoyment of the book. To be honest the two way love between Jerry and Megan flares up rather suddenly. Near up to where Jerry falls for Megan, she was being described by Jerry as a sad dog who now was glad for having been taken for a walk! I haven't met someone like Megan in my life but I'm certain Dame Agatha Christie has. Any waning interest in her books rekindles because of some remarkable insight or description of hers. She must have met some of those people. She cannot have manufactured them out of thin air. That, I think, is impossible.
  • (3/5)
    with all the adaptations going around, it's sometimes hard to remember if you've actually read the book or not

    This is a Miss Marple story, though she does turn up late and is hardly in the story at all.

    This is a story of Burton (and his sister) taking a house in the coutry after his flying accident. Soon they have received a poison pen letter accusing them of not being brother and sister, and not long after this people start dying. Burton has most of it worked out, even if he doesnt realise it, before Miss Marple arrives and ties everything up into a neat bow.

    Once again, a short neat little story and a quick read to while away an afternoon or two
  • (4/5)
    One of the cosier Christies --some are pretty grim but this is mild. A recuperating wounded airman and his sister come to a small village which is afflicted with a spate of nasty anonymous letters. The police believe they are written by a repressed respectable lady, but this turns out not to be the case. Miss Marple appears only briefly at the end to solve the case. One of the nicer features us a budding romance between te POV character (the wounded man) ad a troubled young woman.
  • (3/5)
    Miss Marple doesn't come in until the last third of the book, and even at that point, she's still a secondary character.

    The foreshadowing was interesting (but didn't help me "solve" the mystery)

    I had to skip to the back and see "whodunnit" before I could finish reading.
  • (4/5)
    Jerry Burton and his sister, Joanna, have temporarily located to the sleepy town of Lymstock while Jerry recuperates from injuries from a plane crash. But Lymstock is not as quiet as it appears. Shortly after their arrival Jerry and Joanna are the recipients of a nasty, anonymous letter and they're just one of the many victims in town. But when one of the recipients of a letter commits suicide, things begin to take a much darker turn.Yet another delightful mystery from Agatha Christie. Jerry is a fine narrator for the mystery, which is well-crafted of course. I once again utterly failed to determine whodunnit. Of course, Christie's fantastic dry wit still remains one of my favourite parts of her novels. This one is nominally a Miss Marple novel although she makes a very slim appearance. Still, a highly enjoyable read.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this story. The mystery was well-written and enjoyable. I liked these characters very much. It was fun reading about city folk" moving to the country and causing a stir. Even though this is listed as a Miss Marple mystery, she doesn't appear until the end (just in time to solve the case) and she could have been left out entirely. But, I still enjoyed the story very much."
  • (4/5)
    Brother and sister Jerry and Joanna Burton have leased a house in a small English town while Jerry recuperates from a flying accident. The town's tranquility is soon disturbed by a flurry of poison pen letters making all sorts of false but scandalous accusations. What starts out as an annoyance eventually escalates to sudden death in the suicide of a letter recipient. Although the observant Jerry has noticed circumstances and anomalies that put the letter-writer's identity almost within his grasp, it takes the influence of Miss Marple to make the pieces fall together into the shape of a murderer.This is the third novel featuring Miss Marple, and to this point she could be described as a minor character who functions as a catalyst for others to solve the crimes. It seems like Christie hasn't quite decided what to do with her yet. It's one of my favorite Miss Marple novels, despite the fact that Miss Marple makes only a couple of brief appearances in it.
  • (3/5)
    A very clever, simple solution that makes you look back on everything that's gone before and see it in a different light. Miss Marple's hardly in it, so it doesn't really feel like a Miss Marple book, but there's so much good stuff in it, you don't really mind. Mrs Dane Calthrop, the vicar's wife, is a wonderful character.
  • (3/5)
    Not really a Miss Marple mystery. Marple doesn't appear until about 80% of the way through and then as a cameo role. She then appears at the end to wrap everything up. It was like she was added as an afterthought so it could be a "Miss Marple Mystery." Really, Christie could have inserted any of her sleuths and it wouldn't have made much difference.
  • (3/5)
    A rather enjoyable mystery book. Christie keeps you guessing exactly what is going on in it, but when you come to the end of the book you come to the realization that it all falls into place rather nicely and if you had just looked at things from a slightly different angle you would have gotten there yourself. I rather found it pleasing to read and glad I finished it. I would recommend it to those that want to be able to dissect a mystery novel as this one seems rather ease for that purpose.
  • (4/5)
    I loved the narrator in this. His interactions with the rest of the cast are absolutely priceless. I love that Christie excels at creating eccentric characters that serve their purpose extremely well. Joanna is quite an exuberant woman and I loved the dichotomy between her and her brother. Some really hilarious lines. The mystery is fairly conventional with a disappointingly flat ending but this is such a comfortable book to read. Marple barely makes an appearance but her scenes are efficient and to the point. Good book.
  • (4/5)
    Lymstock, England, ca 1940.Jerry Butler er pilot i RAF og efter et slemt styrt har han brug for fred og ro til at komme sig så han kan smide krykkestokkene. Han og søsteren Joanna flytter derfor til Lymstock, hvor de lejer et lille hus Little Furze af en sød ældre dame Miss Emily Barton. Efter en uges tid dukker et anonymt brev op, der påstår at de ikke er bror og søster. Da lægen lidt senere kommer for at checke op på Jerry, kan han fortælle at brevene florerer. En pudsig detalje er at brevene ser ud til at være skrevet af en ældre dame, men udmærker sig ved slet ikke at bruge noget af det autentiske skandalestof, der findes i den lille by. Affæren udvikler sig da sagføreren Mr Symmingtons kone Mrs Symmington begår selvmord efter at have modtaget et af brevene. Politiet skærper jagten på den anonyme brevskriver. En tjenestepige Agnes bliver brutalt myrdet og alle mistænker alle. Jerry har dog fået et godt øje til Symmingtons datter Megan af første ægteskab og tager hende med til London hvor hun bliver fikset op svarende til hendes 20 år. Joanna driller Jerry med at han er blevet lun på Megan og han må give hende ret. Joanna er til gengæld lun på lægen Owen Griffith og til slut bliver begge par viet.Krimigåden løses med venstre hånd af Miss Jane Marple. De anonyme breve er atypiske, så hvis man nu ser bort fra dem, er der en død dame tilbage og ægtefællen er jo altid den oplagte at mistænke. Tilsæt at konen var lidt træls og at der er kommet en sød (men tomhjernet) guvernante i huset for nylig og sagen har opklaret sig selv. Symmington lokkes i en fælde og alt vender sig til det bedste.Smuk personbeskrivelse, som stadig er gyldig selv om miljøet for længst er ædt af tidens tand.Det er næsten en Miss Marple uden Miss Marple, for hun dukker først op til sidst
  • (5/5)
    Jerry Burton soll auf ärztliche Anordnung „dem Stumpfsinn fröhnen“. Er zieht vorübergehend mit seiner Schwester Joanna in die ländliche Stadt Lymstock. Doch es bleibt nicht lange ruhig. Anonyme Briefe werden verschickt, die gespickt mit Obszönitäten und Unwahrheiten auch Jerry nicht verschonen. Niemand nimmt die Briefe wirklich ernst, bis eines Tages durch solche ein Brief getrieben, ein Selbstmord geschieht. Lymstock ist entsetzt. Wie gut, dass die Pfarrersfrau Miss Marple zu Rate zieht.Auch wenn das Buch in die Reihe der Miss Marple Geschichten eingegliedert ist, so ist doch hier Jerry der eigentliche Protagonist. Unterstrichen wird dies durch die Ich-Perspektive der Erzählung. Er schildert den Fall aus seiner Sicht und kommt der Lösung gefährlich nahe, doch fehlt ihm das Selbstvertrauen, die richtigen Schlussfolgerungen zu ziehen.Dass er in diese Stadt zieht, sieht er zunächst als eine gute Möglichkeit, Klatsch und Tratsch zu erfahren, um so seine Rückenheilung voranschreiten zulassen. Durch seine sympathische Art wird er schnell in die Gemeinde integriert. Besonders die kleine Megan hat es ihm angetan. Megan lebt mit ihrer Mutter, ihrem Stiefvater und ihren Halbbrüdern zusammen und ist eigentlich alt genug, um auf eigenen Beinen zu stehen. Doch die Ignoranz ihrer Familie ihr und ihren Bedürfnissen gegenüber, macht sie zu einem melancholischen Mädchen, das lieber noch einmal klein sein möchte. Erst die Zuneigung Jerrys lockt das doch eigentlich intelligente Mädchen aus der Reserve.Mysteriöse Briefe und die Beziehung zwischen Megan und Jerry bilden die Fixpunkte dieser Geschichte. Christie zeichnet die Hauptpersonen hier besonders persönlich und sympathisch. Man wird regelrecht in diese Erzählung hineingezogen, es bilden sich stille Hoffnungen und nicht umsonst bezeichnet die Autorin diesen Roman als einen ihrer stärksten. Und damit hat sie meiner Ansicht nach recht. Das Buch steckt voller vordergründiger und unterschwelliger Gefühle. Und dabei kommt die eigentliche Kriminalgeschichte nicht zu kurz. Doch Christie schweift hier auch einmal ab, geht neue Wege in der Charakterzeichnung und das macht diesen Roman so faszinierend.Eine sehr emotionale Kriminalgeschichte.
  • (3/5)
    2.5** The fourth installment in the Miss Marple series has the reader visiting the small village of Lymstock. Jerry Burton has come to the quiet town along with his sister, to recuperate from a bad accident. But they are greeted with a vitriolic anonymous letter, and soon discover that someone has been sending such poison pen missives to most of the women in town. The local solicitor’s wife commits suicide after one such note … or does she?This is an intricately plotted mystery, but Miss Marple doesn’t appear until page 153 (out of 216 total pages). Most of the detective work is done by Jerry Burton and the local investigator, Superintendent Nash. They don’t lack for suspects; it seems that almost everyone in town is a potential culprit, including the vicar’s wife! But of course, after hearing a few casual remarks Miss Marple solves the entire case. There are a couple of romantic subplots which are really ridiculous and do nothing to further the mystery. I recognize that Christie frequently included such elements in her earlier works, but it just irritates me.
  • (3/5)
    This one was fun, although I was rather confused at it being a Miss Marple book, since there was no sign of her until more than halfway through. She did arrive, though, a Marple ex machina, solving it all. I could say I found this one easy to figure out, but someone told me how it ended before I got there, so that's cheating.

    The thing I liked most about this, I think, was the narrator, and his relationship with Megan. It just made me laugh -- him calling her catfish, and insulting her, and not knowing how fond of her he was becoming. So I smiled at the happy ending. I wouldn't mind seeing them again, in some later Miss Marple book...

    Again, a fun snack between meals. A palate-cleanser between doses of Chandler, perhaps.
  • (4/5)
    The Moving Finger by Agatha Christie is classed as a Miss Marple mystery, but there was very little evidence of Miss Marple in this book. She didn’t show up until page 142 out of 200 pages, then she proceeded to knit a few rows while solving the identity of the anonymous letter writing murderer.Other than the lack of Miss Marple, I quite liked this book. Set in a seemingly quiet, placid country village, the obscene poison pen letters spared no one and did not hesitate to accuse each recipient of shocking activities. Even with no spark of truth in them these letters caused people to look at one another in a different way and suddenly everyone was under suspicion and accusations were being bandied about. It wasn’t long before suicide and murder followed.With Jane Marple being an almost afterthought, the focus of the book is on Jerry Burton and his sister Joanna, who have come to the village while Jerry recovers from a flying accident. These two are total misfits in the rural village but were two characters that I found very sympathetic and I enjoyed seeing the events unfold through Jerry’s eyes. While The Moving Finger is not destined to be one of my favorite Miss Marple mysteries, it is still going to be considered a very good Agatha Christie mystery.
  • (4/5)
    Murder mysteries aren't usually this charming. That's what's so good about Agatha Christie. The Moving Finger is Marple-lite. The mystery is so small-town - nasty letters are going around and no one knows who sent them. In true Christie fashion, the villagers are paraded past as a string of suspects and the suspense lasts until close to the end. If Miss Marple had narrated, she would have seen the culprit a mile away. She does, of course, save the day. This book has more resolution than other of Christie's novels, but that just adds to the charm.
  • (5/5)
    Previously reviewed in 2011 at THE MOVING FINGER (aka THE CASE OF THE MOVING FINGER) - Miss Marple.I decided to re-read the book as part of my participation in in the monthly meme Crime Fiction of the Year Challenge @ Past Offences. The year for February is 1943.I don't want to repeat much of what I said in the earlier review, so I encourage you to look at that one too.We are never really told what has happened to Jerry Burton to bring him and his sister to Little Furze at Lymstock. He appears to have been an airplane pilot who has crashed - he has been in plaster, has something wrong with his back, he walks with sticks, and wonders if he will ever be able to fly again. The timing of the publication seems to suggest he has be in the war, but there is never a reference to the war effort. He is worried that he will be bored with country life, and certainly his sister Joanna has to make a real effort to fit in. But then they get a poison pen letter suggesting that they are not really brother and sister. Others in the village have already had similarly scurrilous letters and more make their appearance. The local police are baffled and call in an expert from Scotland Yard who points out the similarities between these letters and others in earlier cases that he has solved. The local lawyer's wife gets a letter and commits suicide and then a week later a murder takes place.While this is labelled as a "Miss Marple" she really plays a role only in the last quarter of the book. I wondered in my earlier reading about why she appeared so late and I'm almost convinced that Agatha Christie had originally meant this to be a stand-alone. However by the middle of the book, there are too many red herrings, too many possible murderers and the police and the amateur sleuth Jerry Burton are in desperate need of an independent point of view. So Jane Marple to the rescue! Miss Marple is invited to stay by the vicar's wife, Mrs Dane Calthrop. (She, by the way, will appear 20 years later in an Ariadne Oliver title). Miss Marple of course solves the puzzle. She says the solution was pretty simple. Everone else was just focussing on the wrong things.I am amazed that I can re-read these titles and still find something else in them. I must confess also that I don't remember every plot nuance, so I don't get bored with the re-read either.
  • (4/5)
    Classic Ms. Marple -- what's not to love?
  • (4/5)
    Vintage Christie--ranked against her own competition of jaw-dropping books, such as And Then There Were None, this is a tad less memorable, but it still kept me guessing to the end while playing fair with the reader. Otherwise it's more than solid and has all the hallmarks of her best. There is the picture of life in a small English village in the mid-20th Century, Lymstock, which has been suffering from a series of poison pen letters culminating in murder. There's all the clues that come together in the end like clockwork, the red herrings, the plausible suspects, some of whom you favor, and others you come to care about you so hope didn't do it. There's humor, a nice element of romance, suspense--and oh, and Christie's elderly spinster detective Miss Marple. Although she mostly features at the end with the solution, not coming into the tale until Chapter Six of Eight, only a few dozen pages before the end. The story is the first person account of Jerry Burton, staying at the village with his sister while he recovers from an accident, and he's an appealing character through which to follow the tale.