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Darkfever

Darkfever

Written by Karen Marie Moning

Narrated by Joyce Bean


Darkfever

Written by Karen Marie Moning

Narrated by Joyce Bean

ratings:
3/5 (1,880 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Released:
Oct 31, 2006
ISBN:
9781423319757
Format:
Audiobook

Description

MacKayla Lane's life is good. She has great friends, a decent job, and a car that breaks down only every other week or so. In other words, she's your perfectly ordinary twenty-first-century woman.

Or so she thinks…until something extraordinary happens.

When her sister is murdered, leaving a single clue to her death-a cryptic message on Mac's cell phone-Mac journeys to Ireland in search of answers. The quest to find her sister's killer draws her into a shadowy realm where nothing is as it seems, where good and evil wear the same treacherously seductive mask. She is soon faced with an even greater challenge: staying alive long enough to learn how to handle a power she had no idea she possessed-a gift that allows her to see beyond the world of man, into the dangerous realm of the Fae....

As Mac delves deeper into the mystery of her sister's death, her every move is shadowed by the dark, mysterious Jericho, a man with no past and only mockery for a future. As she begins to close in on the truth, the ruthless Vlane-an alpha Fae who makes sex an addiction for human women-closes in on her. And as the boundary between worlds begins to crumble, Mac's true mission becomes clear: find the elusive Sinsar Dubh before someone else claims the all-powerful Dark Book-because whoever gets to it first holds nothing less than complete control of the very fabric of both worlds in their hands....

Released:
Oct 31, 2006
ISBN:
9781423319757
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Karen Marie Moning nació en Cincinnati, Ohio. Es una autora de fama internacional y un gran éxito en ventas con su serie Fiebre del ya conocido y venerado género de la urban fantasy (fantasía urbana), cuyos derechos han sido obtenidos por la productora Twentieth Century Fox.Sus libros han aparecido en la lista de más vendidos del New York Times, USA Today, Publishers Weekley, Wall Street Journal y The Washington Post, y ha recibido numerosos premios de la industria literaria incluyendo el RITA.Es también autora de la serie Highlanders por la que se dio a conocer. Sus novelas han sido traducidas a más de catorce idiomas. @KarenMMoning www.karenmoning.com


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Reviews

What people think about Darkfever

3.2
1880 ratings / 155 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    *******NOTE: EVERYTHING IN THIS REVIEW STILL STANDS, BUT I JUST WANTED TO SAY THAT SHADOWFEVER, THE FIFTH BOOK IN THE SERIES, IS REALLY SUPER AMAZING, SO KEEP PATIENCE AND FAITH AND READ THROUGH THE OTHERS BECAUSE YOU DO NOT WANT TO MISS IT***

    So..This book was underwhelming given the hype that surrounds it, and its high Goodreads rating. It wasn't all bad though, and I do have high hopes for the sequels.

    The heroine of this book was super-annoying for 90% of the time. She was a stereotypical "blonde" to the max. Loves pink, blabs on about ridiculous nail polish colours... But a note at the back of the book made clear to me that the author deliberately made her that way, rather than merely thinking she was writing someone at the height of cool. And a better, more serious "Mac" shines through every now and again, so I'm hoping to see more of her.

    The male lead was also super-annoying. Too stand-offish, too much the arrogant mentor, too mysterious. But this too, I sense will change. The first book is pretty much devoid of romance after all.

    The world and plot are good, though there are signs it may move too fast/make things too simple. Sidhe-seers who have to pretend not to see the monstrous Fae for what they are like normal humans? Awesome. The villains are a little shallow though. The story is at its best at its darkest, grittiest moments, and when the action is thickest.

    At other times, well... the story has too many little "quirks" that frustrated me. Every few scenes the author would turn prophetic and say something like "little did I know at the time..." or "later I would come to realise..." which served little purpose and was very annoying. Also, the character had a habit or making digs at pop-culture like the paranormal, and pushing the "OMG! I can't believe this, the supernatural DOES NOT EXIST!" line too far. This sort of thing can work in shows like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, because they are self-aware or making fun of themselves in a cool way, rather than an alienating way, but this book really screwed it up. Speaking of Buffy, I suppose that also illuminates my dislike for Mac. Buffy was often shallow to start with, but it was alongside her likable qualities, whereas Mac seemed to have almost none.

    Anyway, I would definitely advise you to pick up this book, because though flawed, it is also short, and I'd like to think of it as an investment in future reading. HOPEFULLY, after reading this book whilst 50% annoyed & frustrated, I will pick up the sequel and be amazed by the transformation. Stay tuned to see if I'm right or wrong.

    ****I HAVE JUST READ THE SECOND BOOK IN THE SERIES:
    Bloodfever is a HUGE improvement on the first book! Mac does mature and become more interesting and likeable, and most of the annoying quirks I mentioned above thankfully disappear (especially the little "prophetic" interjections- I only remember one in the entire second book). So I really really think you should read this book, and continue with the series even if you don't entirely love it, because the second book is worth it.
  • (5/5)
    As I was reading and writing about Karen Marie Moning’s ”Highlander” books, I kept seeing things out of the corner of my eye about the Fever series. Things about how absolutely incredible it was, how much people loved it, how amazing it was, omg. I smiled indulgently, thinking how nice it was that readers were so very loyal to KMM. I had the first book, Darkfever, sitting by waiting for me to get to a stopping point with other books, and I expected it to be as much fun as the other KMMs, more urban fantasy than fantasy romance, and enjoyable. It was incredible. I loved it. It was amazing. And, yes, even a little: omg. My mind is very slightly blown by how good it was, and how thoroughly it exceeded expectation. Oh, it wasn’t perfect – not by a long mark. But it ranks among some of the best urban fantasy, I think.More of the review: on my blogI love that on KMM’s website Mac is represented by Kristen Bell, of Veronica Mars fame. It’s perfect – the blonde blue-eyed wide-eyed appearance, and steel within the magnolia. That would be awfully nice casting. There are breadcrumbs out there leading toward a movie adaptation of the series. Dear Casting Director: Kristen Bell please.)The story was good, though it was a little annoying that the origins were not anything the “Highlander” series accounted for (unless I seriously missed something). It’s the beginning of something (and I chuckled at one review I saw out there in which the reader was steamed that there were no neat resolutions. “Series”, dear heart. Look it up.) I like that the good guys’ team seems very small so far, though there is room for expansion, while the bad guys are numerous and very, very dangerous: what they are capable of is horrifying. (I.e.: That wasn’t parchment.) There is a lot of room to grow in the series – and having said that I need to riff on it, because growth is what has occurred since that first “Highlander” book. That series was play, practice, prologue. The Fever series is what grew out of that.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this novel, but it didn't quite live up to its promise. The prologue introduces a character who seems sure of herself, who knows who she is and what she needs to do. The book itself is supposed to be a "how this all got started" story. However, at the end of the novel you don't have the feeling that she's quite there yet. This is especially troubling because of the annoying tendency she, as the narrator, has of making these portentous statements, usually at the end of a chapter. There's only so many times you can hear someone say how they might have been killed before you want to say, "Well, obviously you weren't, so shut up and get on with it." I'm also not buying into the whole love triangle thing, if that's even what it is. At this point, it's just silly. Maybe it gets better later in the series. I hope so. I'll most likely read the next book to see if the narration gets less annoying.
  • (4/5)
    I almost stopped reading after the first chapter becuase this really didn't seem to be the type of book I normally read, but I'm SO glad I decided to keep going. This was such an exciting book and I can't wait to read the next in the series!! Lots of action, mystery and potential romance--can't wait!
  • (4/5)
    Excellent read. I have had this one on my list for quite sometime. Good character development. I appreciate that the author did not tell everything all at once. The story unfolded. I will recommend that before you finish the first one that you have the second one ready to read!
  • (5/5)
    I read this book in one night! I couldn't get enought of Barrons and v'lane! Instantly ordered the second!
  • (4/5)
    Where the heck have I been these past couple of years?, the fever series has been out for 5 years and I've only just realised now???? Its like I had become possessed when reading this book, as the book had me wanting more and more, without realising I had devoured the entire book in one sitting : I now have to patiently wait until the second book arrives!!!
  • (3/5)
    readable and packed with action, but ultimately this series did not really involve me emotionally
  • (5/5)
    The first in a series from Moning. A departure from her Highlander series, this is seill set in Ireland, but current time, and with a lot of darkness, and spirit. Mckayla lane is a 22 year old who was living the good life in Georgia until she learns her older sister is dead. And under very suspicious circumstances. Mac travels to Dublin to find out what really happened, and to try to decrypt her sissters last voicemail to her, about what she really is, and a thing called the Sinsar Dubh. Then Mac starts seeing things that can't be real, the true evil in Dublin. And the deeper she digs, the more dangerous life becomes for her.An excellent read, amazig imagination, and a style that has you right there with mac every step of the way.
  • (4/5)
    This book has a great mix of supernatural, sexual tension, and mystery. It took me awhile to start to like Mac because of her girly girl ways, but towards the end I really enjoyed seeing her transformation. Jericho was awesome. A curt, brooding man who says and gets what he wants. Even the peripheral characters were enjoyable in their own right.It is my understanding that Moning usually writes the bodice-ripper type books, and there was a smidgen of that in here, but I can tell that she is a fantasy novice. I really didnt like the additions of modern media (which will really date a book) such as mentioning Janet Evonovich books and itunes and Green Day, etc. Its not a huge deal, but its something I tend to cringe at.
  • (5/5)
    Darkfever by Karen Marie Moning is the first book in the Fever Series. I picked up this book because I've heard a lot of positive buzz around the blogosphere for this series. I wanted to see for myself what all the fuss was about. I'm happy to report back that I really liked this first book. What I like most about it was it was not like I thought it would be. It was a lot darker. The story centers around Mac. Mac travels to Ireland after the brutal murder of her sister. The police have closed the case and Mac travels to the emerald island to change their mind. Mac's love and devotion towards her sister is heart breaking. Mac starts asking questions and seeing things that don't make any sense. Mac learns that she has a special ability to see Fae. As cool as that might sound it's anything but. You see the fairies in this story are nothing like Tinker Bell. The Fairies in this story are cruel and dangerous. However Mac stays on course to find out the truth behind her sisters death. Along the way she meets the tall, dark and mysterious stranger, Jericho Barrons. When Barrons hears her in a public place asking about things she shouldn't be asking about it sets him off. On top of that Barrons finds out that she can see Fae. He plans to use that to his advantage. I love Mac. She's a girly girl who is not afraid to kick a little butt. She is a strong female character but not in the obvious sense. I love her quirky sense of humor and her swear words. I was not so crazy about Jericho Barrons character in the beginning. He is too much of a jerk. However as the story progresses Karen Marie Moning lets us see a more relaxed side of Barrons. Overall I thought this story was great. It was not as I expected but it was more. I love the ancient myths and legends used in Darkfever. It is dark, enigmatic and formidable. I've got the fever! I definitely will continue reading this series.
  • (5/5)
    Karen Moning is a phenomenal writer. She takes the world of fairy and shows its dark side with TEETH! I love her style and the way she makes you realize that these creatures are definitely NOT Tinkerbell. Do not read these books expecting fairy dust and wings, you will be sadly disappointed. These books pack PUNCH and Mikayla is a whole new heroine that keeps your heart pumping! Not to mention that her relationship with Jericho Barrons is so steamy you just can't stop reading!
  • (5/5)
    Good read and worthy to be placed on the shelves of my library to re read. I found it suspenseful and was able to be predictable enough that I was scared to understand the danger she was placing herself into next. Good enough that my husband sat to strike and scared me while I was enthralled in the book.
  • (4/5)
    The beginning of this book reminded me so much of Veronica Mars, in fact, I even pictured Kristen Bell as the main character. Mac is on a mission to find her sister's killer, much like Veronica's quest to find her best friends killer. Her sister Alina was a young woman who found herself in a dangerous situation and relationship, believing she was in love with a man who she knew mostly nothing about. But that is where most of the similarities end. Unless there was an alternate season on VM where she deals with crazy creatures from another realm.Mac is quite a paradox, being a fashionista and brightly-colored-clothes-hor who brushes her hair 100 strokes like freakin Marsha Brady, and an exotic car enthusiast with a dash of rough and tumble, or in other words: Supernatural Barbie, who kicks wicked Unseelie ass by the way. The long-time-coming fight scenes were sa-weet and unraveled like a movie in your mind!Now, I must warn some of you that she may come off as annoying at first. This is intentional, as to see how much Mac changes by the end. This is Mac 1.0 and the least awesome of her many versions.I love her theory about men who wear all black: They either want to be trouble or they are trouble. They are also my favorite!! Angel, Spike (isn't it amazing how the characters from the Buffyverse don't really even need more than one name?), Damon Salvatore, Johnny Cash, etc...Despite the fact that I kept thinking the name Mac Barrons sounds like a male porn star name, I liked both MacKayla Lane and Jericho Barrons. Though her calling him Barrons weirds me out a little. Jericho is a much better sounding name.Her whole cussing system is fecking hilarious. I was raised without curse words as well and though I cuss at times now, more often than not I inadvertently fall back on my "substitutes". One of them being the same as hers and my fave: Fudge Bucket. My repertoire has been expanding over the years through many different sources: since reading Leviathan - Barking Spiders!, watching Craig Ferguson - Oh Biscuits!, Chelsea Handler's pickachu, and save the best for last - Frak! If you don't know what that's from, I feel sorry for you that you've never had the pleasure of watching BSG.The description of Barrons Books and Baubles was perfect to the point that it sparked a great debate inside my head. The nature of that debate was trying to determine which body part I would be willing to give up to visit such a place. Not sure I would give up a kidney, but the appendix did not seem worthy enough. I determined the acceptable sacrifice would be my belly-button. Yeah, I would totally give up my innie (and I am rather attached to it) and rock it Kyle XY-style to visit Barrons Books and Baubles. That store sounds amazing!The way she acted around death-by-sex-Fae-guy-whose-name-I-don't-like-either was thoroughly entertaining. I was actually surprised she didn't swell up with a hysterical pregnancy and start lactating right there in the middle of the museum. Geez. Those parts of the book didn't do anything for me but cause a fit of the giggles.If forced to choose one word to describe this book, it would be "consistent". It was easy to read and never lulled or grew too suspenseful. The story stayed in a constant state of intrigue.I'm greatly looking forward to the next, which I think I might pick up in just a few seconds. Mostly, I'm looking forward to some bow-chicka-wow-wow between Mac and Jericho. Aaaah, will I ever get used to calling him Barrons?EDIT: There is something I want to clear up. Just something that I noticed a lot of people have been making comments about. Everyone keeps referring to the Fae as being aliens, which is not entirely accurate. There is only one mention of the Fae being "aliens" and it is in a snarky remark and assumption made by Mac. Barrons doesn't actually confirm the remark, like usual, he just answers her with a question "You didn't think they were natives, did you?" The Fae are in no way ET or the Buggers. They are an inter-dimensional race, not at all unlike most mythology about the Fae or demons or other supernatural beings. Just like in Buffy. I know, it's a shocker that I brought that show into this conversation. I NEVER do that.But if you love Buffy and her forbidden relationships, then you will love this series. The first book is by far the most lackluster, but it is still good. Stick with it. Each consecutive book gets better and better. An amazing series!! A must read for paranormal fans.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this book. The prose is well written and the story is excellent. I like how this author is good at keeping secrets from the reader. If you like dark fantasy, then read this!
  • (4/5)
    The Fae introduced in this book are refreshingly unromanticized, the protagonist shows room for growth and change. I look forward to following this story. My only frustration lies in the feeling that this is less a series than a Part 1. I don't like the feeling that I must read the next installment before I forget parts of the past book. This does not stop me from recommending this book.
  • (3/5)
    Not very good, really, but gave it 3 stars since I was intrigued enough to order the second book in the series.
  • (4/5)
    In this story, Mac finds that her sister has been murdered in Ireland, so she goes to Dublin to find the killer. She ends up discovering that she and her sister are nulls and that is why her sister is was killed. The "bad" Fae are starting to enter this world after years of being imprisoned by the "good" Fae and the bad guy wants to bring all the "bad" Fae over, thereby destroying the world or something like that.It is a good intro to a series. I have started the next one. There are only five books in it, so I am glad there is an end in site.
  • (3/5)
    I heard such great things about this book and it was recommended to me by more than one person so I was really hoping that I would like it a lot more than I did. What was good: The audio book narrator was wonderful. She had the perfect, and I mean PERFECT Georgia accent for MacKayla Lane. A lot of what got me through the book was the great narration. The plot was interesting, Mackayla makes her way to Ireland in search of her sister's murderer and finds out that everything she believed about herself and the world was wrong and that she really didn't know too much about her sister at all. She meets some pretty awful characters/things/creatures and a few fairly rude "friends" along the way. The effects that certain fae have on humans were quite interesting. There is one particular scene in the museum that had me laughing out loud. All in all, the plot was intriguing enough to get me from start to finish while keeping my attention. But it wasn't amazing. When I stopped listening, I didn't find myself eager to get back to it so I could find out what happens next. I think that a lot of my problem with this book comes down to my love of traditional fantasy, and although I do like a unique re-imagining of things, I simply cannot buy into the "fae are aliens" thing. I honestly did not like that aspect of the book at all and is the main reason why I won't be continuing the series. I had no issues with the writing itself. I didn't find it to be overly descriptive, the dialog fit with the situations and wasn't overdone. Even the fact that Mackayla talked a lot about her clothes and could be a bit immature, I felt that would most likely lead to her really growing as a character in later books. So, for anyone who would enjoy a book where the fae are aliens and some come in a many-armed many-mouthed variety, I would recommend this book. Its simply not for me.
  • (4/5)
    Read it - read it now! But be sure to have Bloodfever close by because you will be ready to begin book 2 as soon as you turn the last DF page. Karen Moning is a fabulous writer who has brought to life an entire world complete with a set of good/bad guys (part of the fun is deciding which is which!), sexy hunks, beautiful locations, lust and despair. There is immenient danger with the promise of redemption. Darkfever is just the tip of the iceburg, these characters come to life and "grip" you. Promise yourself you will read long enough to find out why Mac doesn't eat french fries anymore.....
  • (4/5)
    This is the first book in a series about MacKayla Lane.Mac has gone to Ireland to find out who killed her older sister Alina and she learns more than she bargained for. She finds out that she is a Null (a didhe-seer with the power to freeze a Fae with a touch of their hands). She discovers a whole other world that she did not know existed and she meets Jericho Barrons. She is yet to find out what Barrons actually is!I enjoyed the story enough to want to read the series, but Mac drives me crazy becasue at time I think she is crazy, arrogant & stupid at times. Jericho is an interesting character and I do want to learn more about him.
  • (4/5)
    I basically picked up this book becasue all of my book resources recommend this series as a standout. I am not ready to agree to that yet but I did like this book and I will read the rest of the series. Our heroine Mac has received flack online for being 'too stupid to live' or too involved with make up and fashion. I didn't find her too stupid at all. Any mistakes she made could have been made by anyone thrust into this crazy new world. Mac goes to Dublin to investigate her sister's murder and learns what she believes led to her sister's death...both of the sisters can see the fae. Somehow the dark and evil fae are coming into our world in larger numbers. One of them, or something involved with them, has killed Mac's sister. Mac does go on sometimes about make up and such. Its not a lot compared to some paranormal chick lit on shelves now, but for this type of book it did stand out. maybe it will be toned down as the series progresses. I like the character of Barrons. The man is rude and mean but I was never sure if he was all good or all bad. That kept him entertaining. I also like Moning's writing. I wasn't fond of the idea of the relics and the quest for them. I personally usually find that type of story tedious. The plot could get old with this fast. Moning does a great job of ending the story in a way that isn't frusterating but still leaves things open and the reader wanting answers. As long as the rest of the books in this series are at least this good they should be worth reading.
  • (4/5)
    A crazy-fun book. This was a recommendation from a co-worker (I was looking for free books to download on my Kindle), and I'm so glad I gave it chance. The writing style is easy and engaging, and the story really grabs you from the very beginning. I was reading it on a dark thunderstorm-y night, so the mood was set PERFECTLY! Since I don't read a lot in this genre, I can't say how it compares over all, but I would highly recommend this books for newcomers.
  • (5/5)
    Book 1 in a series of 5. Mackayla Lane's sister was murdered in Dublin but before she died she left a mysterious message on Mac's phone. Mac flies to Dublin to find out what the police are doing to find her killer and look for a book that was mentioned in the mysterious message. Mac soon finds out that the world is not as it seems and neither is she.I knew this new series by KMM was out and put off trying to read it knowing full well if I started one I would have to read them all. I was trying to wait until they are all written. The final installment is due Jan 2011! This series is one of the best I have read in years. The complexity of the characters and plot is amazing and by book 4 I still couldn't tell you who the good guys or the bad guys are. All the characters no matter what side they are on having redeeming qualities and nefarious intentions. Since the majority is 1st person POV, we only get to know what Mac knows and this means we don't know the goals and motives of the others, all of them have their own agendas that they keep tight to their chests. Well written, great pacing, wonderful characters, unique and complex plot.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting story line and good character development; makes me want to read the rest of the series.
  • (4/5)
    This is the first book in the five book Fever series by Moning. The fifth book "Shadowfever" is scheduled to release in January of 2011. I enjoyed this first book in the series, although you can tell the purpose of this book is mainly to introduce us to Mac and the world she's been thrust in to.MacKayla Lane, Mac to her friends, is your typical southern belle Barbie-doll type. She loves shopping, scoping out hot guys, and dressing in pink. Then she finds out that her sister, who is studying abroad in Dublin, has been brutally murdered. With the Dublin police poised to set aside the case for lack of evidence, Mac decides to travel out to Dublin and do some investigating of her own. She finds out that she barely knew what her sister was really up to in Dublin; her sister had gotten involved something dark and deadly. Now Mac is being drawn into the darkness too. Mac finds out she is a Null, a very rare type of Fae Seer....and unfortunately Fae don't like Nulls. Now with most of paranormal Dublin out to kill her Mac will need the assistance of the dark and dangerous Jericho Barrons if she is going to survive long enough to hunt down her sister's killer. So good-bye pink high heels and hello black sneakers...Mac's got some Fae to kill.If you like Buffy the Vampire Slayer you will enjoy this book. It really has that same type of vibe going on; pretty blond fashion obsessed girl finds out that she is destined to fight evil dark bad things. Mac comes off as a bit ditsy, fluffy, and naive in the beginning on the book; but as the story continues we start to see a tough core of bravery and stubbornness. Barron is everything you could hope for in a hero; tough, complex, mysterious, seriously bad-ass, and of course gorgeous.Moning does a great job of writing a well-rounded novel. The surrounding descriptions are very good, so you can easily picture the surroundings. The characters are complex and interesting, with many shades of grey to their personalities. The action scenes are well done too. Of course, time is taken to describe Mac's colorful outfits, which soothes the fashionista in me. The world-building is creative, fantastic, and very engaging. There is definitely some dark humor throughout the book, which lightens things up and keeps them from getting too dark.The story was hard to put down and made for a quick read. There is a lot of mystery to be solved and this mystery really keeps you turning pages. This book does wrap up the main storyline of Mac finding her sister's killer, but it doesn't resolve it. In fact you are left with a pretty big cliffhanger. I think if I had read this book when it was first released I would be pissed at how the story ends. Luckily I have the next three books already, so I don't have to wait to continue the story. My recommendation would be to buy the second book with the first one so that you don't have to wait to find out what happens.I was a bit leery about reading a series of books written by a prominent romance author. I shouldn't have worried though...this book is not a romance it is a great dark urban fantasy. All in all it is a pretty dark story with lots of creepy gross evil Fae. It is definitely a read for a mature audience; there are a couple almost rape scenes and some sexual situations as well as quite a bit of swearing.Overall I thought this was a strong urban fantasy and I really enjoyed it. It didn't absolutely blow me away, like Ilona Andrew's Kate Daniels series did or Faith Hunter's Jane Yellowrock series did, but it was engaging and interesting. This book was very much an introduction book and I have a feeling that the story will grow in complexity and interest with the next book in the series, Bloodfever.
  • (5/5)
    Darkfever is the first in a series of four books by Karen Marie Moning. The series, "Fever," takes MacKayla Lane from her shelted life in a provincial Georgia town to Ireland, where she seeks vengence for the murder of Alina, her older sister. Mac quickly finds out that she is about to play a major role in a world she never knew existed. She is swept up in the world of the fae, and as a sidhe-seer, she is one of the few humans who can see them. As she scrambles across Ireland in an attempt to fulfil her sister's last request, she quickly learns that she is outmatched and is forced to team up with Jericho Barrons, a bookstore owner who is not quite what he seems.The book is humorous, equal parts "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and the Southern Vampire Mysteries (True Blood). While amusing, the series does touch on some very serious issues and at times can be very dark. Fans of Moning's Highlander series will be pleased to see a few characters make cross-over cameos (but make no mistake, these books are very different in tone). I highly recommend this books to those of you who love reading about the fae, Ireland, strong women and urban fantasy. This book is a page-turner and will keep you fully engaged.There are currently four books in the series, with the fifth and final book hitting bookstores December 7, 2010.
  • (4/5)
    So, if by some happenstance you are not aware that this book isn't really a romance, let me enlighten you. It's marketed as a romance and the author normally writes romance--but just because it looks like a duck and quacks like a duck does not mean it is a duck. Having said that, I can now talk about what an awesomely entertaining piece of fantasy this was. Mac travels to Ireland in search of her dead sister's killer. She starts to see some very bizarre and unexplainable things. On her quest she stumbled across Jericho Barrons, wealthy and very unlikely ally, who explains to her that what she is seeing are the Fae--some sort of alien? alternate dimension?--group of magical beings that have recently begun to spill from their own world into the human world. Mac starts to believe that the Fae had a hand in her sisters untimely death, and wonders if she is next. If we view this as a fantasy, we have to admit that style-wise it's pretty typical. Girl who's lived normal life encounters not normal things--right. But Moning does it with a certain grace and humor that keeps it from getting overly predictable. The use of mythology is intensely interesting. In addition, I found Mac to be not only likable but easy to relate to--if at times somewhat irritating. There is a lot of exposition in this book, typical of any first in a series. It can get a bit dull--although in my opinion the dull points were blessedly brief. I have mixed feelings about the first person telling of the story. In a lot of ways it works for this particular story because you can get right into Mac's head. But overall I file it as a negative because it can be maddeningly frustrating and contributes to the aforementioned dullness. And yes, one does need to be aware that this is one of the least romantic books you'll see on the romance shelf. But in the end, it is a wonderfully entertaining and fun read, obviously setting up for an epic adventure of a series.
  • (5/5)
    Pampered southern belle, MacKayla Lane travels to Dublin, determined to find the monster that murdered her sister. It does not take Mac long to realize that she what she is looking for really is a monster and that she and her sister were some of the few who can see through a monster's disguise. Soon she is in way over her head and is forced to rely on the help of a man she is not sure is out to help or destroy her.This is the start of a really interesting series. Mac is an interesting character and so are all the people and. uh, things she meets. Despite the dark subject, Moning keeps the pace somehow on the light side, with Mac, definitely a chick lit heroine. I can't wait to see where this is going.
  • (3/5)
    Pure, unadulterated smut. There were portions of this book I would feel bad reading on a public bus, and which could vie with any of the most trashy romance novels for blush-worthiness... not that I don't enjoy a piece of brain candy every now and then, and I admit, this was a fun read. The heroine, a shallow young Georgia belle, goes to Ireland to investigate her sister's murder. There she suddenly discovers she can see the fae, and discovers this hidden world was involved with her sister's death. This catapults her into - what else? - saving the world. While corny, this is entertaining enough. I did, however, find the airheadedness and southern-ness a bit overblown in the main character; in fact, all of the characters are a bit TOO stereotypically their characters. And the "death-by-sex fae?" [sic] Hilarious, and not written in the self-aware sort of way. Well, I'll read the next one anyway.