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The Overcoat: A Nikolai Gogol Story

The Overcoat: A Nikolai Gogol Story

Written by Nikolai Gogol

Narrated by Deaver Brown


The Overcoat: A Nikolai Gogol Story

Written by Nikolai Gogol

Narrated by Deaver Brown

ratings:
4/5 (20 ratings)
Length:
1 hour
Released:
Apr 28, 2011
ISBN:
9781614961154
Format:
Audiobook

Description

The author of Crime and Punishment, Fyodor Dostoevsky said, "We all come out from Gogol's the Overcoat." The story centers on an impoverished clerk who is dedicated to his job as a routine copyist though not recognized for his hard work. Younger clerks mock him for his dedication. His threadbare overcoat is mocked, as he is. He saves to get a new one and wears it for a glorious evening, only to have it stolen that night. He dies soon thereafter from his great loss. Thereafter his ghost is reported to haunt that part of St. Petersburg where the coat was stolen. The story of a lowly clerk, or Russian, come to nothing was a theme of Gogol and many other 19th century Russian writers.
Released:
Apr 28, 2011
ISBN:
9781614961154
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Nikolai Gogol was a Russian novelist and playwright born in what is now considered part of the modern Ukraine. By the time he was 15, Gogol worked as an amateur writer for both Russian and Ukrainian scripts, and then turned his attention and talent to prose. His short-story collections were immediately successful and his first novel, The Government Inspector, was well-received. Gogol went on to publish numerous acclaimed works, including Dead Souls, The Portrait, Marriage, and a revision of Taras Bulba. He died in 1852 while working on the second part of Dead Souls.



Reviews

What people think about The Overcoat

4.0
20 ratings / 3 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (1/5)
    The American-accented narrator is a terrible choice. Wouldn’t listen past 10 seconds.
  • (4/5)
    The story was red like a news report. The person reading this particular one did an intro and then a follow up to kind of share his take on the story. I think it was fine I liked it. I do remember reading this as a younger person. The pain of putting all of your desires enjoy and one basket and then to have them ripped away with no hope lives across the ages
  • (1/5)
    The arrogance in the voice is very distracting