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A Series of Unfortunate Events #7: The Vile Village

A Series of Unfortunate Events #7: The Vile Village

Written by Lemony Snicket

Narrated by Tim Curry


A Series of Unfortunate Events #7: The Vile Village

Written by Lemony Snicket

Narrated by Tim Curry

ratings:
4/5 (132 ratings)
Length:
4 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Sep 21, 2004
ISBN:
9780060793418
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Dear Listener,

Nobody in their right minds would listen to this particular book about the lives of Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire on purpose, because each dismal moment of their stay at the village of V.F.D. has been faithfully and dreadfully recorded on this program.

I can think of no reason why anyone would want to listen to a book containing such unpleasant matters as migrating crows, an angry mob, a newspaper headline, the Duluxe Cell, and some very strange hats.

Publisher:
Released:
Sep 21, 2004
ISBN:
9780060793418
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Lemony Snicket had an unusual education which may or may not explain his ability to evade capture. He is the author of the 13 volumes in A Series of Unfortunate Events, several picture books including The Dark, and the books collectively titled All The Wrong Questions.


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Reviews

What people think about A Series of Unfortunate Events #7

4.2
132 ratings / 41 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    The Baudelaire children continue on their quest to find out more about their deceased parents -- and to escape the clutches of Count Olaf and his troupe of miscreants. I read this title many years ago, but I do recall absolutely loving this series and being impatient to get my hands on the next book in the series!
  • (4/5)
    This was one of the best novels in the Series of Unfortunate Events so far. Previous mysteries are solved, and new juicy details are introduced to keep the reader looking forward to the next installment. I thought Violet's invention in this book was particularly clever and loved the wordplay, as always.
  • (2/5)
    My feelings towards this instalment of the series are unfortunately a bit mixed. In terms of plot, its far from being the best entry in the series. It's slow moving and its plot is utterly bizarre. Which says a lot, given some of the trials that the Baudelaire siblings have faced thus far. I also felt that the end of this book was a bit of an anti-climax, with no clever plot to unmask Olaf or frantic escape.I'm also starting to feel as though this series teases the reader a bit too much. As with the previous instalment, there is no more of Olaf's plan revealed and it's still not even explained what V.F.D actually stands for. In fact, the novel goes out of its way to hand answers to the orphans, only to snatch them away again. As we are seven books into the series now, I would have hoped that Snicket would have given us some morsel of plot development by now.That said, I do appreciate the way that this book does mark a change in the dynamic of the series. Instead of moving to stay with new relatives and being forced to uncover Olaf's disguises, the Baudelaires instead find themselves framed for murder and on the run from the law. I suppose only time will tell if this switch does anything to spice up the series, but I'm at least curious to see how it will pan out in the next novel.
  • (5/5)
    Violet, Klaus, and Sunny arrive in a town covered in crows. They want to find the two Quagmire triplets, but will they?
  • (4/5)
    Twist and turns!
  • (4/5)
    I think I enjoyed this one more than the last few. The formula was shaken up a bit. And I've never heard "deus ex machina" explained so well!
  • (5/5)
    These children need a nap. They’ve been awake for four days straight.
  • (5/5)
    Another enjoyable book in the Series of Unfortunate Events series! I enjoyed the dark imagery of a city covered in crows with citizens who are all too eager to burn at the stake anyone who dares break one of their numerous rules. And of course, things never go well for our poor Boudelaire orphans, but they keep trudging along, making the most of their talents, working together to get through every dire situation. IMO, Lemony Snicket is an ingenious storyteller!
  • (4/5)
    Oh, the voice in this story! Snarky. Clever. Delicious. Perfect.
  • (5/5)
    I really like this volume of the series because it's rather whimsical. A town full of crows, thousands of ridiculous rules, and a hot air balloon house. Of course, all of the Snicket books are on the whimsical side, but this one just takes the cake (a phrase which here means it has crows, rules, and hot air balloon houses rather than meaning there is cake in it).

    I also like this volume because it has what so many other books in the same genre lack: CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT. I mean, the Baudelaires AGE. Sunny MATURES. They actually have BIRTHDAYS. I love it.Also, of course, we get further into the mystery of V.F.D. We get a hint as to what some of the initials stand for, and even briefly meet someone who knows quite a lot about it.On the note of characters, I love Hector. I totally empathize with his skittishness, and I am unspeakably proud of him for overcoming his fear (even if it's a little late).
  • (3/5)
    "It takes a village to raise a child..." But, knowing the Baudelaires' luck; it takes a village to neglect a trio of poor orphans and to force them to do all the chores.
  • (3/5)
    Trying to figure out the secret of VFD, which their friends the Quagmire triplets hinted at in the last book, the Baudelaire orphans go to live in a village titled "VFD" in a pamphlet. But alas, the villagers have no desire to parent the orphans, and isntead expect them to spend all their days cleaning up after the town's flock of crows (a flock so large that it completely blankets the town, making it look like a shivering mirage from afar). And of course, Count Olaf appears to make their lives even more miserable.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this book.I love how Klaus talks about a Deus ex machina, and later one occurs.
  • (4/5)
    This is one my favourites of the series, I LOVED these books when I was a kid. I feel like they really taught me something, not least a lot of vocabulary.

    This book changed the series completely, finally the kids are on their own.
  • (4/5)
    Things are beginning to come together in the Seventh book of the "Series of Unfortunate Events". The Baudelaires are now in a town dedicated to and covered with crows. Through the crows, the children are delivered coded messages from the Quagmire triplets. The messages come in rhymes and the children spend much of their time (when not dealing with all the rules imposed on them by the townspeople) trying to decipher the 'poem'. And here is where the book tickled the literature teacher in me. The children go about systematically thinking about the meaning of each line of the poem, about each word and each word's various meanings and interpretations. What a lovely way to introduce children to literary analysis. Not that the 'poem' is very deep, but it is a fine example of multi-layered readings that a child can easily grasp. When they finally figure out the poem, they are able to rescue the Quagmire triplets, but as can be expected, the Baudelaire children do not escape with them. We learn, however, that Lemony Snicket is intimately related to what has been happening to the Baudelaire children, when his brother (?) Jacques Snicket makes a short and gruesome appearance in the book. Curiouser and curiouser.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing
  • (5/5)
    So good.u have never read such a good series in my whole life. And I have read a lot. I was crying and this book is so sad and bleak,yet
    awesome.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed reading this book because even though, by now, we know how things will unfold, the element of mystery and surprise is still prominent throughout the whole story. Moreover, Esmé could be the definition of a despicable woman, her and Count Olaf are a match made in hell!
  • (3/5)
    Having completed the seventh book in the Series of Unfortunate Events, I must say this one, The Vile Village, was the most difficult to get through. I imagine when I reach the end of the series, this is the one I'll look back on and ask, “what happened in that book?” I remember crows and... that's about it.There were a few moments worth a snicker. The overarching mystery moved forward a little. Very little. Overall, this book was fairly ho-hum. I've seen many television series go through the same thing—a moment where the creative team loses focus, hopes to stretch the plot while they decide what to do next (Anyone remember Lost's “Stranger in a Strange Land”?) I hope that is the case here. I hope this isn't the new direction for A Series of Unfortunate Events, but merely a breather. The Vile Village was equal with The Bad Beginning in scope and overall story, but I expect more from the seventh book in a series, so I declare this one the worst so far.A Series of Unfortunate Events:The Bad Beginning3.1The Reptile Room3.2The Wide Window3.6The Miserable Mill - 3.3 The Austere Academy - 3.4The Ersatz Elevator - 3.3The Vile Village - 3.1
  • (4/5)
    The series finally feels like it's got more mystery to it than in the earlier books. But I agree with user benuathanasia - sometimes you just want to smack them!
  • (4/5)
    Sometimes I just want to smack the orphans for being so dense. Still amusing, however.
  • (4/5)
    Another witty installment where the plot thickens. Not only are we worried about whether the Baudelaires will escape Count Olaf or whether the Quagmires will be saved, we see that the narrator and other characters are interlinked with the plot.
  • (4/5)
    This is a trechorous tale written by Lemony Snicket about threee children who's parents died in a fire. These children go on a series of unfortunate envent. Overall this is a great book and I encourag everybody from 7 and onwards. Rayna
  • (5/5)
    this book is great the Baudlures free their friend in a village of comfment they also get the name muder
  • (5/5)
    It makes me so mad at how the Baudelaire's are wonderful children but are sent to an ungrateful town with a creepy tone to it. These people are ridiculous but at the same time I can't stop reading because theres so many things I don't know.
  • (4/5)
    This book is one of the more scarier books in the series of unfortunate events. I would recommend it to a child who does not get scared easily.
  • (5/5)
    This book is fiction. It is a fantastic book.There are 3 children Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Bauldlaire. There parents had died in a fire and they had been placed to live with many gaurdians all ending in disaster. The Bauldlaire orphans are sent to their 7th home. It is the village of v.f.d. Their new gaurdian is a guy named Hector. In this village there are many many many rules. If uy break one as simple as putting too much nuts on ice cream you will be burned at the stake. Later, the village said they had caaptured Count Olaf, the Bauldlaire's old gaurdian who wants to steel Violet's fortune. It really isn't him. In the night in the jail cell he is murdered. A new detective comes. He is Count Olaf the Bauldlaireshad said. It was true. He was discised as a detective so no one regonized him. Then, trouble has begun and it leeads to so much more in the story. This book is 7 points and i recomend it.By Abby Silver
  • (4/5)
    Yet more bad things happen to the Baudelaires. Normally this series is good at keeping you guessing, but this time I knew the solution to the mystery at the beginning of the book and I've already solved V.F.D. It's disappointing the brilliant Bautdealires aren't up to snuff on this one. It's nice to see them grow and change as a result of their misfortunes, and the series is still clever and well done.
  • (4/5)
    So far, the poor Baudelaire orphans have lost just about everything, and what little they have left they are further on the verge of losing. There are some things that can never be taken from you. These are things like your self-determination or your secret Aztec gold you've placed a special curse on.The Baudelaire orphans have a fortune, but it's not in cursed Aztec gold, so it can be taken away from them. Count Olaf, a distant relation to their family, has tried countless (well, as of this volume, seven) time to get that fortune. It's locked in arrears--a word which here means "unable to be accessed by anyone, orphan or villain"--until the oldest orphan, Violet comes of age.The banker in charge of their late parents' estate, Mr. Poe, has determined that the old maxim "It takes a village to raise a child" to be quite valid, and puts the Baudelaire orphans in the hands of the V.F.D., which may or may not be the same V.F.D. that the Quagmire triplets had mentioned to them before Count Olaf spirited them away in his devious plot to get the Quagmire sapphires, yet another great fortune.While the entire village expects to get free labor from the orphans, only Hector really cares for them. He's the town's handyman, and he is secretly violating several of the village's rules (he has a secret workshop in which he's designing things using forbidden--a word here, which means "all"--technology, and a secret library containing all the books describing people breaking the village's rules, including, of course, the village rulebooks). Additionally, the orphans are getting strange couplets mysteriously, which leads them to believe that the Quagmire triplets are closer than they think. But with the Quagmires comes Olaf, who too, would be closer than they think. So close, that the village elders claim that they have found him, and that they will burn him at the stake.But, again, this is a series of unfortunate events, and it's only the seventh volume, so the orphans trouble cannot possibly be over this soon.This volume is definitely recommended for anyone who has enjoyed the previous six, or any other writings of Lemony Snicket, or his good friend Daniel Handler. This is not the best place to start reading the series, however, as you may find yourself confused when references are made to previous books. In fact this or any later book in the series (or quite possibly any book after and including book two) would not make a good place to start reading the series. The best place would have to be book one: The Bad Beginning. So start there, and by all means, don't finish here (there are still six books to go!). Each volume uncovers more and more mystery AND misery. Enjoy, for the sake the poor Baudelaire orphans.
  • (5/5)
    Dark and mysterious this book leads you into a new era in the Baudelaire's lives.