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A Series of Unfortunate Events #3: The Wide Window

A Series of Unfortunate Events #3: The Wide Window

Written by Lemony Snicket

Narrated by Lemony Snicket


A Series of Unfortunate Events #3: The Wide Window

Written by Lemony Snicket

Narrated by Lemony Snicket

ratings:
3/5 (2,383 ratings)
Length:
3 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Sep 21, 2004
ISBN:
9780060793456
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as ebookEbook

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Description

Dear Listener,

I am sorry to say that the lives of the Baudelaire orphans, Violet, Klaus and Sunny, are filled with bad luck and misery. All of the stories about these three children are unhappy and wretched, and the one you are holding may be the worst of them all.

If you haven't got the stomach for a story that includes a hurricane, hungry leeches, cold cucumber soup and a doll named Pretty Penny, then this audio will probably fill you with despair.

Publisher:
Released:
Sep 21, 2004
ISBN:
9780060793456
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

Lemony Snicket had an unusual education which may or may not explain his ability to evade capture. He is the author of the 13 volumes in A Series of Unfortunate Events, several picture books including The Dark, and the books collectively titled All The Wrong Questions.


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Reviews

What people think about A Series of Unfortunate Events #3

3.2
2383 ratings / 71 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    The Baudelaire orphans (Sunny, Violet and Klaus) have been moved to a new caretaker, Aunt Josephine. Their aunt is scared of many things, like turning the hob on, touching the radiator or twisting a doorknob - anything so simple like that. Since she lost her dear husband Ike in Lake Lachrymose, she will now never go even on its sandy shores.

    When the children once again meet cruel, horrible Count Olaf, how will they survive this terrible adventure without getting into his care? Everybody knows that the only thing evil Olaf is after is the Baudelaire fortune, but his future hope might not come true...

    This book is amazing, but I have to say, I rate it for eight to fifteen year olds. It is astonishing, especially the funny and intelligent way it is written.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)
    I think this one was better than the first two
  • (5/5)
    After their last misadventure, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny are sent to live with their aunt Josephine, a woman with many irrational fears and a house perched on the edge of a cliff. The trio of siblings do their best to make a lovely new home, but the threat of Count Olaf is never far...This series continues to please with over-the-top characters and scenarios accompanied by a salty brand of humor. You'll be rooting for the Baudelaires, especially as they start to put together pieces about their parents' past.
  • (3/5)
    Out of the three books I have read in the series this was my least favorite of them. It isn't a bad story, but when you are reading them more quickly than they were originally published you get a little worn out of the fact no one is listening to these children and that people cannot see through rather simplistic disguises. Also this felt like it suffered a bit from middle-bookitis as I call it, which is an author of a series throwing anything and everything together for a plot that is somewhere in the middle of a series. Often this ends up with a plot that just doesn't feel like a truly interesting and well-thought out book. I am hoping that in the subsequent books we get less carting off to a family member and some engaging underlying plot of the entire series instead of one book off stories. This will provide a reason to continue on into the other ten books of the series, otherwise I may unfortunately end my time with this series of events.
  • (4/5)
    Every story in the "Series of Unfortunate Events" so far has been fun, but I especially loved the wordplay in this book and the fact that it throws out the window (ahem) some of the patterned elements of the previous two stories so that the series can grow and stay interesting to readers. The story also has a powerful message about facing your fears.
  • (3/5)
    Yet again, the three Baudelaire children find themselves having to adjust to another home and caretaker. In The Wide Window, they are sent to live with a distant relative, Aunt Josephine. Aunt Josephine lives at the top of a high hill overlooking Lake Lachrymose. She is a fearful woman who is afraid of being electrocuted by her own telephone and refuses to turn on her radiator because it might cause an explosion. She only prepares cold meals because of her fear of the stove. Aunt Josephine loves grammar and would make Lynne Truss proud with her boldness in pointing out grievous grammatical errors. The children are trying to make the best of their situation with Aunt Josephine when their lives suddenly grow much worse with the appearance of an old nemesis.

    I found myself laughing out loud and reading passages to my husband as I went along just as I had with the previous two books. The dedications in these books are worth reading as well. Although I am enjoying the series and would like to read more, I am ready for a break. The stories are funny and entertaining, however, they are very similar and somewhat predictable.
  • (4/5)
    Astronomical!
  • (5/5)
    Continuing the series as a read aloud with my son. I enjoyed installment 3 more than installment 2, perhaps because the orphans seemed pluckier and more independent here, or perhaps because there was so much discussion of grammatical errors. We also just watched this section of the Netflix adaptation of the series, and it was excellent.
  • (4/5)
    I wanted to read this after gleefully enjoying the first two books of the series a while back. To my delight, I found there was much more substance than I remembered. The explanations of vocabulary in context, the translations of baby Sunny's one-word utterances and the plays on words are fun. The chatty tone of Lemony Snicket, the narrator, urging readers not to go on produces (of course!) the opposite effect and a sense of immediacy.

    Then there are the whimsical characters: the courageous Baudelaire siblings, their ultra-timid Aunt Josephine and their well-meaning but impotent custodian, Mr Banks. In this third installment, the evil Count Olaf isn't very evil at all. He menaces from a distance. It's only then that you realise the genius of the writing. Olaf doesn't do anything particularly evil (at least not until the climax) but we fear him because the children do and we are, as they are, frustrated because of the adults falling for his disguise "hook, line and sinker".

    The most beautiful thing in this book is the setup of the plot. Every odd detail introduced comes back to play a vital role in the denouement and produces some very unpredictable twists, for example, Aunt Josephine's fear of realtors and the grammatical error on Sham's business card. No thread is left untied except that of the fate of the three children, which means I can happily anticipate reading the next installment.

  • (5/5)
    so good more interesting than my life ;-; so yeah umm super interresting....
  • (5/5)
    It was great do more books like this yay ?
  • (5/5)
    I loved the reader of this book he had great expression and I think that the book itself was absolutely amazing and I definitely recommend it.
  • (4/5)
    Not as many sound effects as the previous books but over all it’s good
  • (4/5)
    I am a little disappointed that this did not have the same voice actor variety like the 1st audio book did, but this was recorded with a higher quality microphone than the 1st two, and you can definitely tell!
  • (4/5)
    Brilliantly written. With each misadventure of the Baudelaire orphans passing, the series is becoming more and more addictive.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! It's great for 8-13 year old's. (I'm 12)
  • (5/5)
    awsome book no other book could make my day best book ever
  • (4/5)
    Finished on april 10 2020. I hate coronavirus. It was ok
  • (4/5)
    #76, 2004Read this on recommendation from alpheratz, and in preparation for the release of the film. I'm sure I'll want to see it, and I'd rather have read the books first. I'd read Bad Beginning a while ago, and thought it was so-so. That's pretty much the way I feel about these next two, as well. They are predictable, but entertaining, and there are moments of truly brilliant humour. I do wish someone would just shoot Mr. Poe, though. They couldn't be any worse off without him. ::grin:: My favourite quote (could be considered SPOILERISH):"These are very serious accusations," Mr. Poe said firmly. "I understand that the three of you have had some terrible experiences, and I hope you're not letting your imagination get the best of you. Remember when you lived with Uncle Monty? You were convinced that his assistant, Stephano, was really Count Olaf in disguise.""But Stephano *was* Count Olaf in disguise," Klaus exclaimed."That's not the point," Mr. Poe said.::snort::So, I'm not in love with them, but they're not a bad way to spend a couple of hours. These definitely read as "children's books" to me, while the Harry Potter books do not, but that's not a criticism. Just something I noticed. I'll read the others eventually, which here means, "sometime later when I don't have a gigantic pile of other books already waiting to be read, or maybe when my son is old enough to enjoy them with me."LJ Discussion
  • (3/5)
    This series is a lovely little gem to binge, not only on Netflix, but also as audiobooks. This one was not narrated by Tim Curry, who does a fantastic storytelling job, but by Lemony Snicket himself. Just as the in the books, the story is rather quick with the Baudelaire’s meeting one misfortune after another at the hands of Count Olaf.Aunt Josephine is eccentric, to say the least, and the Netflix series just doesn’t do her justice. She is both hilarious and slightly embarrassing all while being completely paranoid about the most insignificant things. She is definitely a character you remember long after the story is over.I read these many years ago when I was in elementary school, I believe, but they are just as enjoyable as an adult. I usually plug my headphones in for audiobooks so that not only am I not distracted by outside noises, but that I’m also not interrupting my family around me. This one, however, I played on the speaker in my kitchen and my 7 year old would pop in and listen with me sometimes. I could see these as being a great road trip audiobook to listen to, instead of constantly flipping through the radio stations.Even though this is number 3 in the series, the story hasn’t stalled. I find that often in series when it gets to number 3, the story drags and becomes a little redundant, but not with Series of Unfortunate Events. A quick reminder of where the Baudelaire’s have been and onward with their current predicament. It is also only about 3 hours long, a great little chunk of story that can be finished in a day or two of constant listening. Even when I didn’t play the bookAt the end of the day, it was a quick book to listen to that both myself and my daughter enjoyed. It added to the story of one of our favorite Netflix shows and started off my 2019 reading with a punch. I would recommend it to anyone wanting to put a dent in their reading goal and looking for a quick book to listen to or read… but make sure to read the others in the series or you’ll be a little lost.
  • (5/5)
    So much more action in this one! Ah!
  • (5/5)
    Amazing above and beyond!!❤️ it’s just amazing how they made this.
  • (5/5)
    Fab! So scary and gripping! My daughter really loves it.
  • (3/5)
    Better than the second, maybe even the first. I definitely think this needs to be the last book that has the so-called family member adopt the kids, I really want to see them strike out on their own soon. Also, it becomes more apparent that something larger is at play in the background, that there's a real reason why this is happening to the kids.
  • (4/5)
    After Olaf arranges the cruel murder of their sweet and naive Uncle Monty, the Baudelaire children are bundled off to another relative guardian, Aunt Josephine. She lives in a rickety house at the top edge of a cliff that leans out over Lake Lachrymose. The cliff is so unstable that it is supported by wooden beams. Despite her strange and precarious home, Aunt Josephine is scared of everything. She is kind to Violet, Klaus, and Sunny, but she has a multitude of ridiculous rules and restrictions, all intended to keep them safe.While the Baudelaires are not exactly living a life of luxury, they are happy to be with an adult who genuinely cares for them, and in a place that has no trace of Olaf. They soon learn the source of Aunt Joephine's irrational fear. In her library, which is a large room at the end of the house that overlooks the lake through a large window, she recounts the story of her husband's death on Lake Lachrymose. Apparently, the lake has carnivorous leeches who eat people if they can smell any remaining traces of food on them.
  • (5/5)
    More tragedy. We have not yet gotten to the mystery part of the Baudelaire saga, so we just have a lot of tragedy. This book is especially miserable because it's cold and wet, and I have a soft spot for Aunt Josephine. While she is kind of pathetic (and not a good guardian), I sympathize with her a lot.The Baudelaire orphans are especially resourceful in this book, which I like. Klause does very intense research, Violet invents life-saving devices, and Sunny, of course, bites very important things.
  • (4/5)
    As with the first two books in this series (A Series of Unfortunate Events), book three repeats the theme of doom and gloom. These books, thus far, are quite formulaic and offer no real adventure for the adult reader; however, my elementary students appear to enjoy them very much.

    The three orphaned children, Violet, Klaus and Sunny, are again shipped off to some obscure familial relation to be "cared for" as guardian. These adults are flawed by their own demons and fail to truly do what is best for the children. Count Olaf, the 'evil villain', continues to crop up in an effort to steal the children's fortune in any manner possible. He doesn't even mind killing those who are only guilty of being named the children's guardian.

    Not my cup of tea, but a bet is a bet. Err, challenge.
  • (3/5)
    Although still fantastically gothic, this story lost a star due to the fact that its structure was almost exactly the same as The Reptile Room. This was somewhat unfortunate, as it it made it pretty obvious where the plot was heading from the word go.However, the Orphans are as likable as ever and Snicket's wonderful writing style will still not cease to amuse the reader. It is certainly never dull!
  • (3/5)
    Let's just say that this is where the Baudelaire brothers' story starts to get annoying and repetitive. In this book they'll be under the guard of an old aunt that is very nice, but is extremely fearful. And I meant fearful like... she is afraid of touching doorknobs because they might break in hundred pieces and hurt someone. And if that wasn't bad enough, they meet Count Olaf once again, this time under the disguise of a boat renter.

    Lemony Snicket's writing style is very pleasant to read and, like the two previous books, this one is very fast paced. The problem is that what you'll read here is just more of the same characters. They just won't mature in any sort of way, and I think that the fact that the Series of Unfortunate Events being directed to younger people does not justify the fact that Mr. Poe is still irritatingly naive, for an instance.

    I'm still curious to know what's about to happen with the Baudelaire children and Count Olaf, but I'm no longer anxious to know in what kind of situation they'll get into in the book.
  • (3/5)
    In this 'chapter' of the story, the Baudelaire orphans are sent to live with a paranoid aunt who lives in a house precariously perched on a cliff over a lake. Naturally, the evil Count Olaf is still after their fortune, and the trepidatious Aunt Josephine is not likely to get her act together to protect them from anything. If they get out of this mess, it'll be through their own resourcefulness; as usual.

    OK, at this point I've decided I'll read all of these.