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A Series of Unfortunate Events #4: The Miserable Mill

A Series of Unfortunate Events #4: The Miserable Mill

Written by Lemony Snicket

Narrated by Lemony Snicket


A Series of Unfortunate Events #4: The Miserable Mill

Written by Lemony Snicket

Narrated by Lemony Snicket

ratings:
4/5 (162 ratings)
Length:
2 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Sep 21, 2004
ISBN:
9780060793449
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Dear Listener,

If you have chosen to listen to this audio for pleasure, I advise you to put it down instantaneously, because of all the audios describing the unhappy lives of the Baudelaire orphans, The Miserable Mill might be the unhappiest.

This recording contains such unpleasantries as a giant pincher machine, a bad casserole, a man with a cloud of smoke where his head should be, and coupons. If you prefer stories that are more heartwarming, please feel free to make another selection.

Publisher:
Released:
Sep 21, 2004
ISBN:
9780060793449
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Lemony Snicket had an unusual education which may or may not explain his ability to evade capture. He is the author of the 13 volumes in A Series of Unfortunate Events, several picture books including The Dark, and the books collectively titled All The Wrong Questions.


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What people think about A Series of Unfortunate Events #4

4.0
162 ratings / 61 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Lumber mill, hypnosis hi jinx, sword vs tooth fights, and chewing gum.... These poor kids! I can't stop reading
  • (4/5)
    After terrible experiences trying to live with relatives. the Baudelaire children are sent off to work at a mill. Predictably, this is truly terrible and things only go from bad to worse when Count Olaf manages to worm his way back into their lives again.This book is another excellent addition to the quirky series. It is necessary to read the other books first, but fans of the previous three titles will enjoy this one as well.  
  • (3/5)
    This was an improvement over the previous book, but I was let down. I was hoping for some mystery that started connecting these books and thought I was about to get it in this book, but just seems like it was the same old Count Olaf shenanigans. This book also felt more rushed than the previous volumes, which by this I mean the other stories felt a little more thought out and well-executed. This felt like "Snicket" through darts at a dart board to see what would happen this time to the children. The first quarter of this book had promised, but it went down hill from there for me. I am starting to womder if these books are not served justice by me reading them in such a manner that when I finished one I am going unto the next. I may need to put a book or two between them soon. That being said I am continuing with the series, but for me these books are starting to become a little unfortunate.
  • (4/5)
    If you are looking for a happy, pleasant book, put this one right down and I advise against reading this review, as the three Baudelaire orphans' lives certainly do not lead to a happy ending, or anything at all happy.

    The orphans are taken to the Lucky-Smells Lumber Mill to work there, and when they see a huge, eye-shaped building that resembles evil Count Olaf's tattoo and Olaf himself, they get very worried. Charles, a nice man, cannot help them, but can only try to persuade people to take them away from the Lumber Mill. Of course, this does not work, and so when Klaus (the middle Baudelaire orphan) breaks his glasses, he has to go to the eye-shaped building. He comes back in a very sleepy way, and thinks he saw Count Olaf...

    This book is very good, and I recommend this terrifying series to everyone who loves reading brilliant, but horrifying, books.
  • (3/5)
    While I appreciated that the author found a new and interesting way to introduce this book, I found it much slower paced until the very end. The final payoff was good, but I prefer some of the previous volumes in the series.
  • (5/5)
    Loved it. :D
  • (4/5)
    The Baudelaire children are off to stay with yet another guardian, this time in Paltryville, a dingy little town whose main function is to house the Lucky Smells Lumbermill. The owner of the mill also happens to be their new guardian, the cold and unsympathetic Sir. Sir promises to provide the children protection from their nemesis, Count Olaf, while under his care. However, he also requires that they work in the mill as the condition of their stay with him. His partner, Charles, is actually a nice man who feels sorry for the poor juggled-about children, but is unfortunately too weak to stand up to Sir and demand that they receive the kind of care children deserve. At least he shows them the library, and books are always a haven for Violet, Klaus, and Sunny. Of course, even this grim and difficult way of life is too much happiness for the children to keep for long. They quickly notice a building in town that looks suspiciously like the eye tattooed on Olaf's ankle. When the mill's foreman intentionally trips Klaus, causing him to break his glasses, the children discover that the ominous looking building is an optometrist's office, and it is there that Klaus has to go to get his glasses repaired. When he returns, Klaus is not acting like himself, and even causes an accident to befall one of the nice mill workers. Klaus confesses to his sisters that he doesn't remember anything from the time he went to the doctor's office until after the accident. So when the foreman trips Klaus again, once more breaking his glasses, the girls decide to accompany their brother on his visit to the eye doctor.The Baudelaires quickly begin putting the pieces together after they arrive at the office and realize that the receptionist is actually Count Olaf in another of his terrible disguises. The girls also realize that the optometrist, Dr. Orwell, has been hypnotizing Klaus, resulting in his strange behaviors and lost memory. The battle with Olaf is on again. By this stage in the story, the children realize that they are probably on their own in figuring out what Olaf's scheme for stealing their money is this time, and how they can reveal Olaf - who none of the adults believe is an imposter despite his absurdly unbelievable costume as a female receptionist - to the authorities. Fortunately, the three of them are up to the task, far more so than the adults that are supposed to be providing their protection. In this gloomy world that Snicket has created, the adults continue to be cruel, incompetent, completely out of touch with reality, or some combination of all three.
  • (4/5)
    Fascinatingly clever!
  • (4/5)
    Book #4. Again, I watched snippets of this episode but glad to have read the book and understood the parts I've missed. Funny this time around with Olaf (not giving it away) and how we could not see Sir's face throughout the book. As usual, the orphans escape the clutches of Olaf and goes onto the next disaster in the next book. I'm really enjoying the series.
  • (4/5)
    I've read the first three boks in this series twice but never got around to reading more. Now that Neil Patrick Harris has the TV series of these books going I wanted to read this one so I could watch the first season. This is a typical book in the series followinng the same formula which the author actually makes fun of in the narrative. It was a little differentthough in that Count Olaff wasn't really in it much, coming in near the end. His overshadowing prescence loomed throughout though and knowing that NHP is playing him in the TV series I couldn't help but picture him in the role. A quick read and as always, a fun read.
  • (4/5)
    The Baudelaire orphans are sent to work at a lumber mill. They have to live with the owner. An eye shaped building nearby catches their attention. Klaus is tripped by Foreman Flacutono and is sent to the eye shaped building to fix his glasses. There, the optometrist, Dr. Orwell, hypnotizes Klaus. The next morning Klaus is forced to work, still hypnotized, and drops a machine on Phil. Phil is a very optimistic coworker. When Sir says a weird word Klaus is not hypnotized anymore and is back to normal. Soon Klaus is tripped again, breaks his glasses again, and is sent back to the optometrist. He is hypnotized again. Violet then learns that Dr. Orwell is in cahoots with Count Olaf, who pretends to be Shirley. The next day he is about to saw Charlie, Sir's kind helper, on a machine. Violet soon realizes the word to snap Klaus out of hypnotism and he is not hypnotized anymore. Then Dr. Orwell battles Sunny, and Violet is held hostage by the man with the hook and Count Olaf. Soon Mr. Poe arrives and takes the Baudelaires away because Sir forces them to leave. I find this book fair, it was okay. The idea that Count Olaf would be in the eye shaped building was obvious and left no mystery. I wasn't attached to the book and could put it down. I do enjoy the Series of Unfortunate Events but this book wasn't the best.
  • (4/5)
    This one was not as entertaining as the preceeding books in the series, but it was still cute.
  • (2/5)
    The narration was almost impossible to listen to for even three hours.
  • (4/5)
    This audiobook has significant variations in volume throughout. This makes listening difficult when you have to constantly adjust the sound. Otherwise, the book is good and my kids are really enjoying this series.
  • (4/5)
    It is getting better than the previous one. Their adventure way more excited.
  • (5/5)
    The most depressing one yet.
  • (1/5)
    The guys in the Mill shout a lot and they can make you jump every time you hear them. I can't say volume is well-balanced, so that I got rid of turning the volume up and down constantly, at one point I just gave up listening. If you don't change the volume continuously it is either too low to hear or too high to keep your ears unbled.
  • (3/5)
    Last one for 2012! (A quick one sneaking in under the radar... much like Count Olaf keeps sneaking after the Baudelaire children).

    This one sees the children forced to work in an absurdly horrific sawmill. Their new guardian is the cruel and mysterious owner of the mill; his partner is almost kindly, but utterly ineffectual.
    When the evil count Olaf (in disguise, yet again) teams up with a hypnotist/optometrist, and giant saws are in evidence - well, things are bound to get messy.
  • (4/5)
    I highly recommend this series.
  • (4/5)
    While not my favorite book of the Series of Unfortunate Events, it's still very good. For the first time we are introduced to some very nice characters who aren't the orphans' guardian (and thus perhaps may survive the story). Phil and Charles are both very nice and very cool, though with their own quirks.This book is also cool because we get a real element of danger for the orphans. Klaus gets hypnotized, Sunny has a sword fight, Violet has to read a very very large and complicated book. It gets downright intense at the end.
  • (3/5)
    While this novel does share a lot of similarities with its precursors, it does manage to change things around enough to make it feel a little different. Count Olaf is not as central to the story, there is no focus on a new distant relative and hints are beginning to be dropped towards a larger picture. Although the children do not quite cotton on to this, it did leave my curious as to what the Count's tattoo actually means. Now that it's appearing other places, it seems that it ties into a larger plot.On top of this, the children continue to be likable and are even forced to work outside of their comfort zones this time while trying to stay alive. The prose still carries Snicket's unique style - heavy in black humor and repetitive sentences - which may not be to every one's taste but I find utterly irresistible.
  • (3/5)
    The Baudelaire orphans end up at the Lucky Lumber Mill, where not only are they fed no breakfast, and only a stick of gum for lunch, and not only are they forced to work at the mill all day, but Klaus keeps breaking his glasses and getting hypnotized! This book follows the same formula as all the rest, but I do adore Snicket's asides. He's the uber-Poe, and I love him so.
  • (4/5)
    Once again the children are at the mercy of completely idiotic adults and villains. Conditions at the mill are exaggeratedly awful and then there is the dastardly hypnosis. I'm ready for the children to not be at the mercy of idiots all the time.
  • (5/5)
    I love Lemony Snicket - there is nothing else for me to say.
  • (3/5)
    Certainly the most different of the books so far, adopted by the owner of a lumber mill, the Baudelaires have to work in the mill and watch out for Count Olaf at the same time.

    I hope this spells a change in the series, as I said before, I want to see the kids set out on their own path, to discover the mysteries being kept from them and more.
  • (2/5)
    This was a bit tiresome by the end of the story. And a swordfight with a Sunny's teeth was even a bit of a stretch for me. But oh well. At least Sir won't be in the next book.
  • (3/5)
    The Miserable Mill, fourth book in the Series of Unfortunate Events, finds Violet, Klaus, and Sunny working in a lumber mill situated next to an eye-shaped building. Klaus breaks his glasses 3 times and is forced to visit the optometrist in the eye-shaped building, and he returns with a strange change in his personality. The tattoo of an eye on Count Olaf's ankle, the one thing that convinces the good adults (Mr. Poe, for example) that "Shirley" the secretary is really Count Olaf, hints of some bigger conspiracy against the Baudelaire children. Is the eye a symbol of some sinister secret society bent on torturing and controlling the children? Is there some connection between children reading this story and this sinister society? Could the narrator's lesson to the reader on how to read an impenetrable book (on eye diseases and hypnotism no less) be more than just an explanation of how Violet found the information she needed to help Klaus? We certainly hope so. And so onward to the next book in the series.
  • (3/5)
    This one it's kinda boating but the end is good
  • (4/5)
    It is mind-boggling how adults in these series are utterly oblivious to everything going on around them which makes the children feel helpless at times. It is like being able to see in a realm ruled by blind people but that’s what makes the whole thing a tad more interesting.
  • (2/5)
    These are really pretty crappy books. The jokey self-referential writing (which was already tiresome by the end of the first book) is just irritating after the umpteenth repetition, the characters are unsympathetic (in the case of the main characters), one-dimensional (everyone else), or obnoxious (the narrator), and the plot repetitive and predictable. It's a good thing I'm a devoted dad and if my son wants me to read these to him at bedtime, I'll grit my teeth and read 'em. But I don't have to like 'em.