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The Power of Less: The Fine Art of Limiting Yourself to the Essential...in Business and in Life

The Power of Less: The Fine Art of Limiting Yourself to the Essential...in Business and in Life

Written by Leo Babauta

Narrated by Fred Stella


The Power of Less: The Fine Art of Limiting Yourself to the Essential...in Business and in Life

Written by Leo Babauta

Narrated by Fred Stella

ratings:
4.5/5 (85 ratings)
Length:
3 hours
Released:
Jan 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781423378587
Format:
Audiobook

Description

With the countless distractions that come from every corner of a modern life, it's amazing that we're ever able to accomplish anything. The Power of Less demonstrates how to streamline your life by identifying the essential and eliminating the unnecessary-freeing you from everyday clutter and allowing you to focus on accomplishing the goals that can change your life for the better.

The Power of Less will show you how to:

• Break any goal down into manageable tasks
• Focus on only a few tasks at a time
• Create new and productive habits
• Hone your focus
• Increase your efficiency

By setting limits for yourself and making the most of the resources you already have, you'll finally be able work less, work smarter, and focus on living the life that you deserve.

Released:
Jan 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781423378587
Format:
Audiobook

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Reviews

What people think about The Power of Less

4.4
85 ratings / 7 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    this is a great book! i really enjoyed it !!!
  • (3/5)
    So much of “do this” and “don’t do this” with some kind of formula of success. The kind of books that I don’t like when we know that there is multiple path for success
  • (5/5)
    This book is about developing power through simplifying your life. It goes beyond success and concentrates on fulfillment.
  • (5/5)
    Loved every part of it! Definitely a read over and over again type of book.
  • (4/5)
    More helpful than I expected, but some of the material feels a bit dated or out of touch.
  • (3/5)
    Lately, I've read a number of books on time management/self-improvement. The Power of Less is definitely worth reading, but not the best in the field. The key aspect I will bring with me from reading this book is trying to cut out some "nice to have:s/do:s" by challenging my "to-do"-llists and requests from others around me as well as work through 1 habit at a time. However, in my line of work I cannot go as far as the author prescribes e.g. not scheduling meetings even if I'd like to. The book include many of the standard advice given in similar books, and also the author repeat a number of the advice he's giving through out the book. On one hand, the repetition makes it stick - but it also made me think about the statement the author made in the beginning of the book of cutting down words in e-mails...sometimes he should have applied it to this book alternatively used some of the words to go a bit deeper.All in all, it is a nice book with some good advice that is described in an accessible way - which is something not to take for granted when reading self-improvement books.
  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I'm a big fan of Leo Babauta's blog, Zen Habits. This book elaborates on some of the ideas introduced in the blog. Most books on productivity focus on how to track "to do" items and how to fit them all into your schedule. Babauta invites readers to consider whether items are really important enough to be on their to do lists at all. He suggests that by focusing on important tasks, we can do less and achieve more. He also shares some specific ideas about how to implement this philosophy. I especially liked his concept of MITs (most important tasks). Every morning, you should identify three MITs that will move you closer to your One Goal (the goal on which you are currently focusing) or that relate to your 3 key projects. Although it won't take you all day to get these three MITs done, you should feel a sense of satisfaction after accomplishing them. And even if you get nothing else done, you have made meaningful progress. While I like Babauta's philosophy, I'm not sure that there is enough here to justify a whole book. The ideas are relatively simple (although in all fairness, Babauta would say probably say that's because simple ideas are all that is needed). I also found it difficult to apply some of Babauta's ideas to my work situation. I work on many research projects with teams of colleagues and graduate students, so my work is fairly interdependent with others. Babauta doesn't spend much time on how to implement these ideas when your work is highly collaborative. At one point in the book, he suggests that one shouldn't schedule many meetings. Instead, he recommends telling people who want to meet with you that they should call you a few minutes before they want to meet. You can decide at that point in time whether you will meet with them or not. While I'm all for limiting meetings, this suggestion seems like it would cause headaches for those who are dependent on me and ultimately lead to negative outcomes for our projects. Even so, Babauta's ideas are a good reminder about the power of focus, especially given the prevalence of multi-tasking in today's world.

    1 person found this helpful