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Eye in the Sky

Eye in the Sky

Written by Philip K. Dick

Narrated by Dan John Miller


Eye in the Sky

Written by Philip K. Dick

Narrated by Dan John Miller

ratings:
4/5 (17 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Released:
Jun 26, 2012
ISBN:
9781455881567
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

When a routine tour of a particle accelerator goes awry, Jack Hamilton and the rest of his tour group find themselves in a world ruled by Old Testament morality, where the smallest
infraction can bring about a plague of locusts. Escape from that world is not the end, though, as they plunge into a Communist dystopia and a world where everything is an enemy.

Philip K. Dick was aggressively individualistic, and no worldview is safe from his acerbic and hilarious takedowns. Eye in the Sky blends the thrills and the jokes to craft a startling morality lesson hidden inside a comedy.
Released:
Jun 26, 2012
ISBN:
9781455881567
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Over a writing career that spanned three decades, PHILIP K. DICK (1928–1982) published 36 science fiction novels and 121 short stories in which he explored the essence of what makes man human and the dangers of centralized power. Toward the end of his life, his work turned to deeply personal, metaphysical questions concerning the nature of God. Eleven novels and short stories have been adapted to film, notably Blade Runner (based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), Total Recall,Minority Report, and A Scanner Darkly. The recipient of critical acclaim and numerous awards throughout his career, Dick was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2005, and in 2007 the Library of America published a selection of his novels in three volumes. His work has been translated into more than twenty-five languages.


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What people think about Eye in the Sky

4.2
17 ratings / 2 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    Another reality distortion effect novel. Not the best but some really odd goings on in here.
  • (4/5)
    My reactions to this novel upon reading it in 1989 -- with spoilers.Like most Philip K. Dick novels, this one was weird, humorous, and sometimes horrifying.The premise -- a Bevatron accident releasing enough energy for individual neurotic world views to be materially realized -- is absurd and quite compelling and fascinating. As usual in Dick's works, there is much black humor here and just plain humor: horses with trousers, magical vending machine, scientists consulting prayer wheels. And, as usual, the dialogue is real, and the characters well-done (though definately less well-developed than in latter novels -- this was the fourth novel Dick published). Dick's concern, as usual, is for the individual. Here, as in Dr. Bloodmoney, is an early black character in sf -- not, as Dick said in an interview, a saint or martyr but a real, if put upon, character with flaws, neuroses, and a need for security. McFeyffe tries to destroy Marsha (and, indirectly, Jack) Hamilton because she is a member of the "cult of individualism" unwilling to go along with communism or the status quo in toto. Hence, both sides see her as a threat. Clearly, though, she is a character Dick felt laudable and much like him. The novel is clearly about political orders imposing, like the three neurotics' worlds, their order on reality even to the point of altering behavior of individuals and their appearance (a genuinely scary part of the book). However, the book's most vicious attack is reserved for communism. A great scene is the flaming slogans wrecking destruction on the earth after falling from the sky. Jack Hamilton refers to it as insane, prudish, and father-worshipping belief -- the worst features of the other three fantasy worlds. However, it is not as scary as Miss Reiss' paranoid worldIn the last analysis, though, it is the central ideal of this book that makes it so memorable: that we may impose our neuroses on reality to the detriment of others and, like Reiss, ourselves. And, of course, the corollary, that our bodies and minds molded by others views of reality and, like Silke, we may not realize it. Dick gives us a frightening, thought-provoking metaphor for politics and society.