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Double Sin and Other Stories

Double Sin and Other Stories

Written by Agatha Christie

Narrated by Isla Blair, Joan Hickson, Anna Massey and


Double Sin and Other Stories

Written by Agatha Christie

Narrated by Isla Blair, Joan Hickson, Anna Massey and

ratings:
4.5/5 (46 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 21, 2012
ISBN:
9780062243799
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as ebookEbook

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Description

Miss Marple and Hercule Poirot both make appearances in Agatha Christie's Double Sin and Other Stories, a sterling collection of short mystery fiction that offers double the suspense, surprise, and fun.

In one of London's most elegant shops, a decorative doll dressed in green velvet adopts some rather human, and rather sinister, traits.

A country gentleman is questioned about a murder yet to be committed.

While summoning spirits, a medium is drawn closer to the world of the dead than she ever dared imagine possible.

In a small country church, a dying man's last word becomes both an elegy and a clue to a crime.

These chilling stories, and more, cleverly wrought by master Agatha Christie and solved by the inimitable Hercule Poirot and Miss Jane Marple.

Publisher:
Released:
Aug 21, 2012
ISBN:
9780062243799
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

Agatha Christie (1890-1976) was an English author of mystery fiction whose status in the genre is unparalleled. A prolific and dedicated creator, she wrote short stories, plays and poems, but her fame is due primarily to her mystery novels, especially those featuring two of the most celebrated sleuths in crime fiction, Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple. Ms. Christie’s novels have sold in excess of two billion copies, making her the best-selling author of fiction in the world, with total sales comparable only to those of William Shakespeare or The Bible. Despite the fact that she did not enjoy cinema, almost 40 films have been produced based on her work.


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What people think about Double Sin and Other Stories

4.3
46 ratings / 8 Reviews
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  • (4/5)
    This was a random collection of short stories by Agatha Christie. Some of the stories were great, and some left me wondering "what just happened here?", but not in a good way. Her mysteries starring Poirot and Miss Marple were what I expected. However, I was not expecting her gothic horror short stories. "The Dressmaker's Doll" was a decent supernatural story. I thought the conclusion was a great way to end the story. I found myself smiling when it was over. "The Last Seance" was one of the stories left me scratching my head. I'm still not sure what happened at the ending. But they were all brief, short stories so I don't feel like I wasted too much time on the duds.
  • (4/5)
    In the long run I had actually already read five of these short stories in other collections, and I also realised that I had actually seen television versions of the other three.Double Sin is the story of a young woman and her aunt who sell antiques and who run an insurance scam, looking for gullible travellers who will back up their claim that their wares have been stolen. In this case though they pick on Poirot and Hastings.Wasps' Nest. Hercule Poirot becomes convinced that someone of his acquaintance is about to commit murder and he sets out to prevent it.The Double Clue is the first of the stories that features the Countess Vera Rossakoff, a Russian lady who becomes involved in the theft some rubies and an emerald necklace. She makes the mistake of leaving two clues.
  • (3/5)
    8 stories. REFUSED to read the Last Seance. Dressmaker's Doll was creepy!
  • (4/5)
    Double Sin: Poirot & Marple, Christie

    ? ? ?

    Double Sin: Waylaid on the way to visit a client, M. Poirot & Hastings come across a niece selling a valuable piece for her aunt and a young man w/ a "feeble" mustache

    Wasp's Nest: A dying man, caught in a love triangle, plots a murder... seemingly his own.... M. Poirot heads him off at the pass

    The Theft of the Royal Ruby (also known as The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding): A missing ruby ends up in the Christmas Pudding, M. Poirot grabs it and proceeds to solve the case

    The Dressmaker's Doll: A doll appears in the shop—a floppy, long-legged doll that sits itself on the best sofa. But where did it come from, and why does it appear to watch them?

    Greenshaw's Folly: An old woman who likes to play games, shot in the back w/ an arrow; a Lady's Companion owed back wages; a disinherited nephew; and Miss Marple as a witness to the will.....

    The Double Clue: M. Poirot is asked to attend a dinner party of a famous collector... After dinner the safe is found to have been rifled and its contents removed. For some reason there are two very obvious clues.... Why would a thief be so careless as to leave two personal belongings behind?

    The Last Seance: "Raoul Daubreuil insists his fiancée give up her activities as a talented and successful medium when they marry. However, he agrees to attend what is to be her last séance—with Madame Exe. But even Raoul can't foresee the tragedy ahead." -- Amazon

    Sanctuary: "Bunch, engrossed in her flower arrangements for the church, is placing the chrysanthemums when she sees a man crumpled over on the chancel steps, dying. The man can only utter one word, “sanctuary.” No one at the vicarage understands what he means, and nothing can be done to stop his death. But, when his relatives promptly arrive to pick up his possessions, Bunch can’t get the word out of her head. She knows just who to turn to, her godmother, Miss Marple. What Bunch and Miss Marple discover is more exciting than anything that could be expected to happen in a sleepy village like Chipping Cleghorn. Who is this man, and what does “sanctuary” mean?" --Amazon
  • (2/5)
    Overall, not among the best offerings by the "Grand dame of murder". A fair variety of stories with Poirot and Miss Marple putting in appearances.
  • (4/5)
    Collection of short mysteries. Some include Miss Marple, and some include Hercule Poirot.Not read her short stories before, but these were mostly entertaining.
  • (4/5)
    A short story collection featuring two Miss Marple stories, two supernatural tales, and a healthy dose of Hercule Poirot.As always, Dame Agatha delivers a good read. The mystery stories are well-paced and to the point. In most cases, the clues are cleverly interspersed in such a way that the reader can guess along, but there are a couple of tales herein that deviate from this format. Nothing is particularly deep, but that's hardly the intention. The stories make for a quick, entertaining read that Dame Agatha's fans should enjoy.Take note, though, that most of these stories have been reprinted in at least one other volume. (I believe "Greenshaw's Folly" appears in two others). Depending on which collections you've read, you may already be acquainted with them.
  • (4/5)
    After last week's disappointment with The Man in the Brown Suit, I was relieved to get back to some solid, quality Christie. It was not unlike having Poirot and Miss Marple standing there waving to me as the train pulled into the station after a long ride on a seat with a broken spring while across from me a man with a nose the size and shape of a kielbasa talked without ceasing about his years of service during the Boer War, only pausing once to eat his lunch of raw onions and sardines. Yes, it was that degree of an unendurable reading experience! So, the sight of Poirot and Marple practically brought tears to my eyes.Until now, I'd only read Agatha's novels, but after barely surviving The Man in the Brown Suit I decided to dip into her short stories, and so I picked Double Sin as my entry into the mini-mystery territory. Double Sin is by no means perfect—there are a couple of stories which go nowhere and which really aren't mysteries at all ("The Dressmaker's Doll" is a ghost story…and not a very spooky one, at that).Still, it was fascinating to see how Agatha was able to condense complex mystery plots into the space of thirty pages or less. While the collection was published in 1961, most of the stories were written in the 1920s, back when Agatha was still sharpening her (poison) pen. None of them bear the mark of a rank amateur. These stories are muscular and demonstrate the author's full control over her plots and characters. Due to their length, they get to the point quickly and waste little time with character development or lengthy lists of suspects.The title story is a waste-no-time brain teaser involving the theft of some valuable miniature collectibles. The pace of the story pushes forward from page to page, leaving us breathless and always in awe of Poirot's keen observation skills. From the first paragraph, we learn that, like Sherlock Holmes before him, as Poirot's fame has grown, so too has the demand on his time:I had called in at my friend Poirot's rooms to find him sadly overworked. So much had he become the rage that every rich woman who had mislaid a bracelet or lost a pet kitten rushed to secure the services of the great Hercule Poirot. My little friend was a strange mixture of Flemish thrift and artistic fervor.The true mystery of "Double Sin" is actually a diversion from the case Poirot originally sets out to solve. While he and Hastings are traveling en route to help an old friend, their attention is caught by the plight of a young girl who thinks her luggage has been lost. Agatha wastes no more words on that original case as Poirot quickly solves the matter of the missing miniatures."The Theft of the Royal Ruby" (also known as "The Adventure of the Christmas Pudding") is as enjoyable for the way it envelopes the reader in the sights and smells of Christmas as it is for the way in which Poirot solves the mystery at the fourteenth-century English manor house. Agatha gets a lot of mileage out of building the atmosphere of "an old-fashioned Christmas," mentioning at every turn things like Christmas pudding (the size of a large football), the stockings, the turkeys ("one boiled and one roast"), the mistletoe and "the snowman outside the window." The mystery itself is almost inconsequential in this case.As always, Agatha deploys all available skill at describing her characters in one or two pithy sentences. For instance, here's this unforgettable entrance in "The Double Clue":Without the least warning the door flew open, and a whirlwind in human form invaded our privacy, bringing with her a swirl of sables…and a hat rampant with slaughtered ospreys. Countess Vera Rossakoff was a somewhat disturbing personality.By the way, the key clue in this story also turns up in Murder on the Orient Express. It seems that Agatha, like Hercule Poirot, was big on thrift and artistic fervor.