Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
Ernest Hemingway: A Writer's Life

Ernest Hemingway: A Writer's Life

Written by Catherine Reef

Narrated by Jill Shellabarger


Ernest Hemingway: A Writer's Life

Written by Catherine Reef

Narrated by Jill Shellabarger

ratings:
4/5 (13 ratings)
Length:
4 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jul 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781608145799
Format:
Audiobook

Description

An introduction to the life and work of one of the most significant and notorious American writers of the 20th century. Ernest Hemingway’s literary status alone makes him worthy of a biography. In addition, his life sounds like a suspense story – it’s full of action, romance, heartbreak, machismo, mishaps, celebrity, and tragedy. He had first-hand experience of several historic events of the last century, and he rubbed elbows with many other notable writers and intellectual greats of our time. Though his reputation has weathered ups and downs, his status as an American icon remains untouchable. Here, in the only biography available to young people, Catherine Reef introduces listeners to Hemingway’s work, with a focus on his themes and writing styles and his place in the history of American fiction, and examines writers who influenced him and those he later influenced.
Publisher:
Released:
Jul 1, 2009
ISBN:
9781608145799
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Catherine Reef is the author of more than 40 nonfiction books, including many highly acclaimed biographies for young people. She lives in College Park, Maryland. www.catherinereef.com.


Related to Ernest Hemingway

Related Audiobooks
Related Articles

Reviews

What people think about Ernest Hemingway

4.2
13 ratings / 3 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Wonderfull and so well read
    I tried to read him when I was many years ago I shall now reread all his work Thanks
  • (5/5)
    4
  • (4/5)
    “All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.” - Ernest Hemingway Catherine Reef’s book is a rich and highly readable account of one of American Literature’s most fascinating stories: the actual life of Ernest Hemingway. His biography reads like the script of an action film; complete with guns, wild animals, women, and war -- and also intense darkness and heartbreak. “A Writer’s Life” follows the literary figure through two World Wars, eleven novels, four wives, innumerable scars, and one very untimely ending. Based on the material presented in the book, it is easy to understand why people gravitated towards Hemingway. His zeal and passion was magnetic, and his raw talent was irreproachable. I absolutely loved reading about his early years in Paris with his first wife Hadley, and during the same time, the relationships he began to form with other writers (Sherwood Anderson, Scott F. Fitzgerald, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein, etc.). “Everything we did took on new importance when (Ernest) was with us,” said his friend, Ruth Bradford. (45) As his story continued, it also became easy to understand why the people in his life became so exhausted by him. His passion and zeal spiraled into a life of recklessness and a general disregard for those who cared about him the most. It was heartbreaking to read about the multitude of relationships he threw away for selfish or arrogant reasons. As one close acquaintance described, he was “an impossible friend.” (109)The book touches briefly on Hemingway’s “theory of omission,” (84, 101) which guided the simplicity and sparseness of his writing. I have always felt that this was the single most fascinating element of his prose -- the ability to say so much, with so few words. However, after reading this biography, it has been interesting to consider how little any “theory of omission” applied to the way he actually lived, which was quite the opposite of simple or sparse. Despite all of his faults, however, I found myself rooting for him throughout every phase of his life. There is just something inspiring about the fearless and unceasing way in which he attacked the world. “A Writer’s Life” is a wonderfully written biography, filled with incredible primary source photos and fascinating quotations directly from (and about) Hemingway. Over the course of the book, the author summarizes all of his major novels and points out the direct biographical connections. This “survey” of his work, so to speak, is a really excellent introduction to Hemingway’s catalogue and an excellent starting point for any reader with a budding interest in the writer.