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The Narrative of Sojourner Truth
The Narrative of Sojourner Truth
The Narrative of Sojourner Truth
Audiobook3 hours

The Narrative of Sojourner Truth

Written by Olive Gilbert

Narrated by Bobbie Frohman

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

3/5

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About this audiobook

A poignant biography as told to Olive Gilbert by Isabella Bomefree-a slave (1797-1883) who later took the name of Sojourner Truth. She recounts the harshness of life under slavery and after winning her freedom, became a vociferous abolitionist for which she has been long remembered and revered.
LanguageEnglish
Release dateJan 1, 2009
ISBN9780982185360

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Reviews for The Narrative of Sojourner Truth

Rating: 3.0980392156862746 out of 5 stars
3/5

102 ratings7 reviews

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  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Fascinating look at a fascinating woman. Looking forward to reading the 1884 edition.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    While I had learned her name in history class, I never really knew the story of Sojourner Truth. I had even heard of and listened to a recounting of her most famous speech, "Ain't I a woman?" But I guess I never really understood who she was before.

    She was a much more interesting person than I gave her credit for, but I suppose that could be said of most historical figures. There is so much more here than I expected there to be.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    I would love to give this book 5 stars, because I would love to give Sojourner 5 stars. But unfortunately the book, is not the woman, and doesn't do a very great job of portraying her life. Only the first half of the book is her actual "Narrative," which unfortunately she leaves a great deal out of, due to reasons which these days seem ludicrous. She did not want to give the horrors of her time in slavery due to thinking that it would be scoffed at as fake, plus being ashamed etc. And she withheld other things saying that they'd injure innocent parties to find those people did such things, which is quite frustrating. And since she had no education and couldn't read or write, she merely dictated to a friend, and as such who knows how much of it was reworded and altered by the friend as they wrote it. But it did give a fair bit of insight as to who the woman was, and what made her tick, and showing how extraordinary she was. In a time when blacks and women had no rights, no nothing, not only did she fiercly stand up for herself and what she felt to be her rights, but she actually took people to court, several times, and she won!! When blacks didn't even have last names, and women were to be seen and not heard, Sjourner Truth took people to court for slandering her name and she won!However, the 2nd half of the book was her "Book of Life," her book(s) of mementos from her travels, articles about her in papers, signatures from friends and dignitaries she met with, was a chore to read through. Once you've read several of the articles, you've essentially read them all, except there's still another 50 or so to read through. It was dull rereading the same rundown over and over again. It would be much nicer if an editor in the future only published a few select articles, and then pulled out any distinct memorable quotes from the rest of them and put those in, rather than all the repetitive articles. And a list of the memorable signitaries would also suffice, rather than reading all the "Sojourner stayed with us on such&such date and gave a speech at such&such place and is such a wonderful lady" etc bits. It was just very dull trite reading. I loved hearing about her, hearing anecdotes from people, hearing about the various jerks she ripped into with her keen intellect, I'd love to hear more of that sort of thing. Unfortunately this book is just very dry. But I would encourage everyone to learn about this fabulous lady.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    First published in 1850 to further the cause of the abolition movement, the Narrative of Sojourner Truth is the story of an illiterate former slave from New York born with the name Isabella. She tells of the hardships she and her family endured because of slavery, and of her hard-won emancipation and subsequent itinerant Christian ministry. Isabella changed her name to Sojourner Truth in the early 1840s because she felt called of God to travel the country and preach that people should believe in Jesus and refrain from sin - especially the sin of slavery. While the finer points of her theology were often unorthodox, her zeal for "truth" as she understood it was fervent. Sojourner told her story to a "sympathetic white woman" named Olive Gilbert who faithfully recounted it in this book. The Dover Thrift Edition is 80 pages, with no index, footnotes, or bibliography.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    Surely a classic, but not in the Shakespearean sense. It is a unique look into the life of one of millions of American slaves; never to discount her story or trials and tribulations, hers and any other slave's tale is worth documenting. From her childhood, Isabella (aka Sojourner Truth) is at a disadvantage. Only able to speak Dutch; never educated in the modern function of time, be it hours or days; and has no knowledge in money management. Be unlettered, she cannot document her story into an autobiography, rather this book is a dictated biography. Her journey into the realm of religion, from a childlike understanding to a temporary extremism to a metered evangelism, her religiosity juxtaposes against the religious justification many of the slave owners used to keep others in bondage.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    I hadn't expected this book would be so deeply-seated in sermon. Religious texts are something that I struggle with, it's a personal struggle, it's nothing against the text, but my experiences just mean that I really find it hard to relate to sermons or religious texts.

    And yet, I learnt so much from Sojourner Truth, or, Isabella, as she was also known. There were parts of this story that commanded my attention. Truth took a white man to court, after the white man illegally stole her son.

    She was ruthless in her pursuit of her son, of justice, of this case, and that is why I wanted to read this book. There are many slave narratives out there, and so few of them are written by women. And here in this book, I felt her mother's love, her sense of justice and her tireless pursuit.

    Next on the list, I'd love to read her most famous speech, "Ain't I a Woman?"

    I feel like this is just the start of what I want to read from her.



  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    I had only heard of Sojourner
    Truth but didn’t know her story. She was extraordinary.