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One Up On Wall Street: How To Use What You Already Know To Make Money In The Market

One Up On Wall Street: How To Use What You Already Know To Make Money In The Market

Written by Peter Lynch

Narrated by Peter Lynch


One Up On Wall Street: How To Use What You Already Know To Make Money In The Market

Written by Peter Lynch

Narrated by Peter Lynch

ratings:
4.5/5 (395 ratings)
Length:
2 hours
Released:
Oct 1, 1989
ISBN:
9780743545594
Format:
Audiobook

Description

STOCKS ARE THE NUMBER ONE MONEY-MAKING INVESTMENT TODAY. HERE'S HOW YOU CAN MAKE MONEY IN THE MARKET!

Peter Lynch has been called "an investment superstar" (Fortune). Manager of the $9 billion Fidelity Magellan Fund, he has earned investors a 190,000 return on a 10,000 investment over the last twelve years. Now Peter Lynch shows how you can make a profit on Wall Street with the knowledge you already have. Discover:

Why smart money is not so smart -- and why you may be a better stock picker than the pros
How to follow your hunches -- and back them up with facts
Why you should forget everything you hear about the economy and how to pick your own time to buy and sell
How to determine which kinds of stocks are best for you

From price-earnings ratios to cash assets, from low growth stocks to "The Twelve Silliest Things People Say About Stock Prices," here is a powerful guide to investing -- from "one of the greatest investors to ever buy stock" (Barron's Financial Weekly).
Released:
Oct 1, 1989
ISBN:
9780743545594
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Peter Lynch managed the Fidelity Magellan Fund from 1977 to 1990 when it was one of the most successful mutual-funds of all time. He then became a vice chairman at Fidelity and more recently has become a prominent philanthropist particularly active in the Boston area. His books include One Up on Wall Street, Beating the Street, and Learn to Earn (all written with John Rothchild).


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Reviews

What people think about One Up On Wall Street

4.7
395 ratings / 29 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Brilliant - for new investors to stock market. Sound advice throughout!
  • (4/5)
    Some good pieces of advice. But rest for novices rather than well-informed traders
  • (5/5)
    This book is up there with the Motley Fool series of books. Great information, to the point, and cogent all at once. Recommend.
  • (5/5)
    Nice and short straight to the point book on an alternative way of thinking about long-term investments
  • (5/5)
    Excellent for stock selection and tenbagger achievement, stocks rotations, portfolio management.
  • (5/5)
    This is a no nonsense, give it to me straight, kind of book for anyone interested in the stock market. Peter Lynch is a legend in this space. One of the best stock market books I’ve ever read. Listeners can begin applying content and participating in the market immediately.
  • (5/5)
    nicely presented with lot of examples , data and major milestones in stock market
  • (5/5)
    Easy to understand book about Investing

    I will keep reading more of his books

    Thank you so much


    Enjoyed so much
  • (5/5)
    Great to listen this and I really loved the flexibility of this audio version.
  • (4/5)
    Informative, no BS, short, concise, practical, well read, good voice
  • (5/5)
    Quite a lot of useful tips and tricks about checking companies financial statements about their real state and when to buy or sell/sell out stocks.
  • (5/5)
    This book provides some of the most insightful tips when it comes to investing. It simple language and easy to follow . Peter Lynch is undoubtedly one of the best investors to ever live.
  • (1/5)
    Not sure if this abridged version is supposed to leave out major details and revelations, but this was certainly lacking to say the least in both compared to other great titles I've read or listened to. This book doesn't deserve the reputation it has.
  • (3/5)
    Good overview of stock investing. However information is very dated and some are hard to apply in the age of big tech domination.

    Audio edition is only 2 hours. Very abridged but given dated content it’s probably a good quick summary.
  • (5/5)
    Best book for volatile times like these. Practical and straight forward
  • (5/5)
    This is a must listen if you are learning about stocks
  • (5/5)
    I have replayed 3x to clearly understand ; life lessons. Thank You!
  • (5/5)
    It’s a must read book for any investor I liked it
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Easy to understand and clear even about complex concepts.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)
    Best book on investing. Have read 3 times & may read 100 more times. A must read for beginners in stock investing.
  • (4/5)
    For all of the financial capital under their control, it has always amazed me how anonymous most portfolio managers are. Money management companies(e.g., Fidelity, Putnam, Vanguard) are well-known, but the men and women who actually make the investment decisions typically are not, particularly to non-groupies who don?t stay glued to CNBC. Of course, Peter Lynch is an exception; his performance record while running Fidelity?s Magellan fund was so spectacular that the firm simply could not keep him hidden. This is the first of two books?'Beating the Street' being the other?that crystallizes his ?power of the little guy? investment philosophy. If Ben Graham is the quintessential value investor, Lynch embodies the GARP (Growth at a Reasonable Price) strategy. His straightforward approach is based on two imminently sensible ideas: (1) good, well-run companies with expanding franchises make the best investments over the long run, and (2) individual investors often have an advantage over institutional investors because, as everyday consumers of goods and services, they are in a better position to gather information on the quality of those firms. Lynch develops these ideas in a practical and approachable manner, usually illustrating his points with examples from his own experience. Although some of these stories feel a little dated by now (e.g., Micron Technology, Service Corporation International), the wisdom inherent in his approach is timeless. He was truly a master at the art of building a stock portfolio from the bottom up and much of that accumulated wisdom is captured in this volume; in fact, the chapter on 'Some Famous Numbers' is worth price of the book alone.
  • (3/5)
    I found this an interesting book about how one man made decisions about what companies were worth investing in. It's not a practical guide but it shows you Lynch's perspective on the process, the rewards and the pitfalls, and how to view companies as an investor. It made the whole thing less mystifying. I didn't come away feeling I could necessarily make the best decisions, but I did come away feeling I could spot someone making poor decisions, especially poor decisions for me.
  • (5/5)
    This is a short book, but long on advice even, and especially, after the financial meltdown. It took me about 40 - 45 minutes to go through the book, but I'll read it again tomorrow and maybe again next week allowing the content to set in. The book is a fun read and gives novices, such as myself, some basic fundamentals and concepts before we rush in (again) to lose our money (again) while the big boys rake all the profits (again) in the casino we all know as the stock market. There is no specific advice in this book other than to spend as much time researching a stock as you would buying a new refrigerator; however I found the general concepts interesting and informative. But reader beware, even though the book is short Lynch does get the point across that choosing your own stocks is and making money is a combination of perspiration and luck. I've made the mistake of rushing in to buy a certain stock that was "hot", sometimes it worked out but mostly I lost money.
  • (4/5)
    The perspective given in this book comes from someone who's been involved for a great number of years in picking stocks for Fidelity Mutual. It offers a lot of caution, while at the same time pointing out that practically anyone can beat the picks of wall street. His rationale is that fund managers and the like are constrained by a variety of rules that practically guarantee that the hot stock they pick has already had its largest gain. Only individuals can spot a potentially hot stock and have the freedom to invest. At the same time, he offers a lot of advice on avoiding common investing mistakes. The book is nothing earth-shattering, but it does provide good words of wisdom that I found very useful.
  • (4/5)
    Good introduction on investing that shows that even lay folks like myself have a chance to do reasonably well.
  • (5/5)
    An incredible and fascinating book about how to use amateur knowledge to make winning stock purchases. A highly recommeneded must-read for anyone planning to invest in stocks. It is also a great reference as Lynch goes over important stock numbers and gives good advice. The only downside is that the book can be tiresome with his many recounts of stock purchases he's made.
  • (4/5)
    This is a classic guide on how to invest for value in the stock market. There are many pretenders, but few can match Peter Lynch's brilliant performance of consistently returning more than 18% per year with the Fidelity Magellan fund he managed. His no-nonsense, avoid-the-hype approach is very clearly explained in this straightforward guide.
  • (5/5)
    I love all three of Peter Lynch's books, but this is the best. It contains within it the secret of successful stockpicking and much wit and wisdom. Lynch was a successful fund manager, a claim to fame in itself, with a disarmingly simple style. Follow it and you will be casing department stores and cozying up to investor relations departments in no time. You see: "All you have to do is put as much effort into picking your stocks as you do into buying your groceries."
  • (3/5)
    Overly simplied, but an excellent book for beginners (better than Intelligent Investor). When you buy stocks with products/stores that you like, remember two things: (1) Check the valuation; don't overpay. (2) Ask yourself if the product/store is just a "fad" that does not have sustainable growth power in the long run.