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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: Level 2

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: Level 2

Written by Mark Twain

Narrated by Iman


The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: Level 2

Written by Mark Twain

Narrated by Iman

ratings:
4/5 (107 ratings)
Length:
49 minutes
Released:
Jul 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780848113117
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

This audiobook is about a boy named Tom who gets into trouble but is also very clever. Tom is adventurous. Tom and some of his friends sneak away to an island while folks back home look for them.

This audio classic novel has been carefully abridged and adapted into 10 short easy to understand chapters. This format enables listeners of all ages and English language abilities to understand and enjoy the story. Composition includes original custom back ground music.

Released:
Jul 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780848113117
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (Florida, Misuri, 1835 - Redding, Connecticut, 1910)


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Reviews

What people think about The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

3.9
107 ratings / 145 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    A young criminal mastermind-in-training gets into mischief with his disreputable neighborhood friends.
  • (3/5)
    This tells the story of a boy, Tom Sawyer, and his best friend, Huck Finn, and some of the adventures they get into. Some of those adventures include ghosts, haunted houses and treasure. I listened to an audio version of this one, narrated by William Dufris. The narrator was very good with amazing expressions, but my mind wandered, anyway. The one mostly couldn't hold my interest. Because of that, I missed a lot, so initially, it almost felt like these were short stories, rather than a novel. A lot of the same characters did return later, and I think storylines were picked up again later, but it was hard to connect everything because I just hadn't focused enough. However, the parts of the book that I did catch, I thought were cute. And, I have to give bonus points for the narrator, so an “o.k.” 3 stars it is.
  • (5/5)
    One of the greatest books I have ever read! It made me long to be a child again, though I was nowhere near as imaginative as Tom or Huck.
  • (3/5)
    I read this book in my 6th grade. The story was gripping but not my favorite.
  • (4/5)
    Even though this book is well over a century old it still holds up! It's funny, witty, and remarkably insightful into the head of a mischievous young boy. The games, and clothes, and manners may have changed; but kids would still be easily able to relate to the games that Tom Sawyer and his friend Huckleberry Finn play. From pirates to adventurers, they know how to have fun with practically nothing but their imagination. And the trouble, lord these two boys know how to get in trouble and worry their families half to death. From running away, getting lost in caves, witnessing a murder and more, Tom Sawyer is the king of trouble. A must read classic!
  • (2/5)
    Cruciaal is de ontmoeting met Huckleberry Finn. Vinnige dialogen; Mooie impressie van jongensachtige gevoelens en leefwereld, genre Witte van Zichem (Claes is duidelijk maar een doordrukje van Twain). Toch maar matig boek.
  • (3/5)
    Borderline 3.5 stars, but not quite. Mainly because I didn't begin to truly enjoy the story until 2/3 of the way through.

    This is the first time I have ever read Mark Twain, and wanted to read this as a precursor to Huck Finn. I respect Mark Twain and his influence on many popular authors. For me, this particular novel does not hold water against some of the other American greats (Steinbeck, Edgar Allen Poe, Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe, etc).

    A lot can be said in regards to the portrayals of African-Americans and Native Americans in the book (particularly the character "Injun Joe"), and Tom Sawyer is often censored or banned due to the language. Without a doubt, parts of the novel were certainly uncomfortable to this modern reader. I actually appreciated this, as it gives a glimpse of what life was like--from the perspective of Mississippi River dwelling, Southern, white children--in the pre-Civil War South. Racism and all. I enjoyed the satirical approach and exaggeration to some of the customs and superstitions of that community during that time period.

    Having said that, I concurrently read some of Twain's (Sam Clemens') other writings on American Indians, and it is atrocious. Product of the times or not, it left a bitter aftertaste while reading Sawyer. Hence the 3 stars.

    I do feel any use of this text in school should include a discussion on racism, fear, discrimination, freedom, etc.
  • (4/5)
    I think I was supposed to read this in college. But never did. There were more important things to do like... (never mind).It was time to make up for the mistakes of my youth and take in a classic. That the audiobook was narrated by Nick Offerman was a bonus that moved Tom Sawyer to the top of my to-read list.
  • (4/5)
    I am adding this book as one of our family read-alouds. While often read by high school students as "classic" literature, this book proved a hit with my family audience, ages 8, 14,17 and middle aged.
    It is funny and suspenseful and the characters are vivid, all requirements for making it on our read aloud picks.
  • (3/5)
    I think Mark Twain is overrated.
  • (4/5)
    My dad read this book to me as a kid and I loved it. I had the best time re-reading it as an adult - remembering parts of the dialogue I knew by heart and enjoying the social satire bits that don't always register when you're a kid. A classic!
  • (3/5)
    I really doubted this book would be a thriller, or energetic to read. This book makes you want to fall asleep while reading it. I am so sorry, but this book had so many POV'S I could not keep up. MY REVIEW; This book was a serious letdown. I thought there would be more action because it tells about a boys and his friends life in this story. NO ACTION. I liked some parts like when they were trying to find treasure and couldn't find it for like 3 chapters! No. Terrible absolutely did not like the writing. There was also different related stories to read while you finish Tom Sawyer but I decided NOT to read it.
  • (4/5)
    I had never read the Adventures of Tom Sawyer except in a childhood version in Golden Books or something like that. I skipped right over to read Huck Finn. While this is definitely a children's book in many ways, Twain writes in such a way that adults still enjoy Tom and his picaresque adventures, both as nostalgia for our own childhoods and because the adult voice of Twain cannot help inserting his snide commentaries on humanity.
  • (5/5)
    One of the books that I thought I had read but hadn't. It rushes along, adventure after adventure, capturing what it is is to be a child growing up.
  • (4/5)
    I'd forgotten what a little trouble maker Tom was. It was a nice enjoyable read.
  • (5/5)
    Why had I never read this classic before?... who knows! But i'm glad I have now read it and will move right into listening to the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
  • (5/5)
    Always preferred this to Huckleberry Finn--which puts me on the wrong side of just about everybody else's opinion. If the ending in the caves doesn't get your pulse racing, you probably don't have one. Found a beautiful like-new copy of the Heritage Edition, with color plates and numerous illustrations by Norman Rockwell.
  • (3/5)
    My advice would be to drop whatever you're reading and read this now, before you're thirty-eight and can appreciate it but never love it.
  • (4/5)
    One point less for mocking Christianity
  • (2/5)
    Cruciaal is de ontmoeting met Huckleberry Finn. Vinnige dialogen; Mooie impressie van jongensachtige gevoelens en leefwereld, genre Witte van Zichem (Claes is duidelijk maar een doordrukje van Twain). Toch maar matig boek.
  • (4/5)
    Never read this during all my school years so I thought I had to give it a shot. I was surprised. I found the book to be rather enjoyable and unlike many other "classics" that fail to live up to the hype. A great story and definitely a classic.
  • (5/5)
    This is a classic in American literature. What more can be said.
  • (5/5)
    Classic in every sense. Something new every time you read it.
  • (5/5)
    i absolutely loved it!
  • (4/5)
    Twain's bold themes are wonderfully depicted in this novel where Tom gets into all sorts of mischief. I love Twain's literary style and humor. Worth reading it at least once, if not more.
  • (3/5)
    For Christmas, I ordered an mp3 player (Library of Classics) that was pre-loaded with 100 works of classic literature in an audio format. Each work is in the public domain and is read by amateurs, so the quality of the presentation is hit or miss. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is a classic piece of 19th century literature penned by Mark Twain. It recounts several adventures in the life of a young, Missouri boy living in a small town on the Mississippi River. While it is at times amusing, the rural, 19th century slang and extremely superstitious beliefs of many of the characters, explained at length, soon becomes tiresome and annoying. Taken in small doses, the escapades of Sawyer and his compatriot Huck Finn can be tolerable, but combined in book length form, they soon lose their charm.
  • (5/5)
    From this novel I have learned that one can be the person who opens the door to someone in need in a time of desperation and changes his or her life for best. This message is portrayed by the characters of Will and Mr. Tom because when in need Mr. Tom provided Willie with a home, food, and most importantly of love and care he had never received from his mother. This novel contain historical episodes. For example Zach dies in an air raids. If one was not careful could die at any moment. Also, women were looked down to and were not expected to get a good eduction. This book is consider a classic in the literature. The way the story is written transport the reader to each scene.
  • (5/5)
    This book would've been given to one of my brothers at some stage and it's ended up in my possession. I'm sure no one ever read it the whole time its faded spine graced the family bookshelves. I think if I'd picked it up as a kid I would've found the dialect a bit difficult. It's only after watching plenty of TV that I have an inkling as to how those boys would've actually spoken. I must've read the first part at some stage, because the scene of Tom swindling the neighbourhood boys into white washing the fence is a resonant one.Anyhow, I'm glad I read the whole thing and can't believe it never got spoilered for me. Next I'll be cracking the spine on Huckleberry Finn.
  • (4/5)
    At the risk of repeating myself, I have taught Tom Sawyer many times as the novel in my five-book freshman intro to lit at MA community colleges. Of course Huck Finn is the novel most taught in colleges; Huck is the son of the town drunk, just as Edwin Land who invented the Polaroid was slanderously reputed to be. In HF, Twain does get the dialects well, and Jim is so well drawn, while the subject of race is paramount. But Tom Sawyer is actually a better critique of two major American institutions: schools and churches. Regarding schools, Tom Sawyer is the best critique of English composition--or preacher's rhetoric--in American lit.It's also a good critique of forms of adventure now so prevalent in film and TV; Tom compares forms of heroic withdrawal from the world, and finds a pirate preferable:"You see, a pirate don't have to do anything, Joe, when he's ashore, but a hermit, he has to be praying considerable, and then he don't have any fun, anyway, all by himself that way"(ch 13). True, the action plot with Injun Joe etc leads to a lame conclusion more like Horatio Alger; Tom invests at 5% to his greater glory. But here in the 21st C such a conclusion still holds appeal for retired readers.The freshman course I assigned this in always involved one play like an August Wilson or usually Shakespeare's Much Ado or Measure For Measure, one book of short stories, often by one author like VS Naipaul or Hemingway of Flannery O'Connor, a collection of poems, sometimes some essays, and a novel like TS or Seize the Day or Slaughterhouse-Five or Confederacy of Dunces or Alice in Wonderland. Sometimes local author Slocum's Sailing Alone Around the World.
  • (4/5)
    The unabridged version, though racist and somewhat ignorant, looses the charm of the characters when edited. This book is an accurate reflection of an awkward time in the youth of our nation, and rather than glossed over, needs to be appreciated as such. We have come a long way!