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The Black Echo

The Black Echo

Written by Michael Connelly

Narrated by Dick Hill


The Black Echo

Written by Michael Connelly

Narrated by Dick Hill

ratings:
4.5/5 (462 ratings)
Length:
13 hours
Released:
May 1, 2017
ISBN:
9781543612806
Format:
Audiobook

Description

For maverick LAPD homicide detective Harry Bosch, the body in the drainpipe at Mulholland Dam is more than another anonymous statistic. This one is personal…because the murdered man was a fellow Vietnam 'tunnel rat' who had fought side by side with him in a hellish underground war. Now Bosch is about to relive the horror of Nam. From a dangerous maze of blind alleys to a daring criminal heist beneath the city, his survival instincts will once again be tested to their limit. Pitted against enemies inside his own department and forced to make the agonizing choice between justice and vengeance, Bosch goes on the hunt for a killer whose true face will shock him.
Released:
May 1, 2017
ISBN:
9781543612806
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Michael Connelly is an American author of detective novels and other crime fiction, notably those featuring LAPD Detective Hieronymus "Harry" Bosch and criminal defense attorney Mickey Haller. His books have been translated into 36 languages and have won many awards. He lives with his family in Florida.



Reviews

What people think about The Black Echo

4.5
462 ratings / 88 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    [Cross-posted to Knite Writes]This book took me a while to get into. I think the beginning was a little slow, but I can overlook that given the quality of the book as a whole.Obviously, Connelly has been hugely successful with Harry Bosch (see: the number of books in the series), and I can understand why. The plot is excellent. The pacing is fast but not too fast. There’s plenty of action mixed in with important character development scenes and world-building. I can’t point out a single thing wrong with the plot of this book — it’s tight. Everything makes sense. There are no loose ends. The book has a tense climax and really good falling action. It doesn’t just drop off and end suddenly. It’s a gradual and interesting decline to a conclusion that promises the possibility for good future sequels.I didn’t find anything especially fresh and new in Connelly’s voice or POV, although I thought his dialogue was excellent. Lots of realistic slang and accents. It gave you the sense that the setting was genuine. I’ve never been to LA, but I could picture it and its people perfectly thanks to Connelly’s descriptions and dialogue.So, pretty good on all fronts.
  • (4/5)
    A very enjoyable first outing in this series but there was one aspect of the story which without it would have made the book stronger.
  • (5/5)
    For maverick LAPD homicide detective Harry Bosch, the body in the drainpipe at Mulholland Dam is more than another anonymous statistic. This one is personal...because the murdered man was a fellow Vietnam "tunnel rat" who had fought side by side with him in a hellish underground war. Now Bosch is about to relive the horror of Nam. From a dangerous maze of blind alleys to a daring criminal heist beneath the city, his survival instincts will once again be tested to their limit. Pitted against enemies inside his own department and forced to make the agonizing choice between justice and vengeance, Bosch goes on the hunt for a killer whose true face will shock him.
  • (4/5)
    I couldn't get much of a fix on the character of Harry Bosch in this book, though I was pleased not to be offered yet another snarking detective who can't help but offend every one he encounters. The pacing and plot are somewhat jerky, but I appreciated that when Harry is questioning something that he has observed it is always important to the solution of the mystery. Some of the characters are interesting, some seem dashed off. The strangeness of having the city I've lived in for 50 years both correctly and incorrectly described interfered a bit with my absorption in the book - I've lived in Hollywood, Mid-town, Santa Monica and worked in the valley, downtown and Westwood, and only the scenes up by the reservoir were in unfamiliar territory.
  • (3/5)
    I wanted to start a new mystery/detective series as it had been quite some time since I had read any books of that type. I decided on Michael Connelly because people seem to enjoy his books. I enjoyed this first book of Connelly's Harry Bosch series and I will read the next for sure.

    With that said, this book was simply another one of those books where it was nice to read, quick and fun, but left no last impressions. I can't say I didn't like it, but it was something to read at the end of the summer as a simple joy. It was an older book, so part of the enjoyment was the lack of technology - like the police having to run to cell phones every so often to call in - and the simple formula of a detective story. That is pretty much all I have to say about it.
  • (5/5)
    It's hard to believe that Michael Connelly had a number of rejections before this book got published. But that's what James Lee Burke, another of my favourite writers, says in the foreword to this book. Apparently Burke also had trouble finding a publisher for his first book but his agent kept shopping it around and Burke was very thankful for his persistence. He praised his agent when his book finally was published, Connelly read that book and approached the same agent who saw in Connelly's writing the same thing he had seen in JLB's. Many books later for both these writers I am also thankful for the agent because I have enjoyed everything they have written. This is the first book in the Harry Bosch series by Connelly. I've read a number of the later books in the series but this one sets everything in motion so I thought it would be important to read it. Bosch is called out late one night because a body has been found in a culvert near the LA reservoir. The body belonged to a junkie and at first glance it looked like he had overdosed but Bosch took more than a glance and realized that he knew the victim. It was a man he had been in Vietnam with who had been a tunnel rat, like Bosch. Bosch thought the man had been killed elsewhere and left in the culvert. On examining the victim's apartment he found a pawn ticket and when he went to the pawn shop he found that the shop had been burgled the night before. One of the items taken was the necklace that had been pawned. The pawn shop owner had a picture of the necklace however and Bosch was able to ascertain that it had been taken in a spectacular bank heist a number of months back. This particular bank job had occurred on the Labour Day weekend. The thieves had tunnelled underneath the safety deposit vault, blown a hole in the bottom of the vault and opened many safety deposit boxes over the long weekend. Nobody had been caught and none of the items taken from the boxes had ever shown up before now. The FBI had jurisdiction over the bank case so Bosch went to see them. There he met special agent Eleanor Wish with whom he would go on to investigate the case. As they are tracking down the bank robbers (who probably also killed the murder victim) Bosch and Wish start to fall in love. A loner like Bosch and with some baggage dating back to the Vietnam war, Wish would seem to be an ideal partner. However, by the end of the book Bosch is alone again. This is a terrific start to a terrific series.