Enjoy millions of ebooks, audiobooks, magazines, and more

Only $11.99/month after trial. Cancel anytime.

Kitty and The Midnight Hour

Kitty and The Midnight Hour

Written by Carrie Vaughn

Narrated by Marguerite Gavin


Kitty and The Midnight Hour

Written by Carrie Vaughn

Narrated by Marguerite Gavin

ratings:
4/5 (117 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 17, 2009
ISBN:
9781400182589
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Kitty Norville is a midnight-shift DJ for a Denver radio station-and a werewolf in the closet. Sick of lame song requests, she accidentally starts "The Midnight Hour," a late-night advice show for the supernaturally disadvantaged.



After desperate vampires, werewolves, and witches across the country begin calling in to share their woes, her new show is a raging success. But it's Kitty who can use some help. With one sexy werewolf hunter and a few homicidal undead on her tail, Kitty may have bitten off more than she can chew.
Publisher:
Released:
Aug 17, 2009
ISBN:
9781400182589
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Carrie Vaughn is best known for her New York Times bestselling series of novels about a werewolf named Kitty who hosts a talk radio show for the supernaturally disadvantaged. Her novels include a near-Earth space opera, Martians Abroad, from Tor Books, and the post-apocalyptic murder mysteries Bannerless and The Wild Dead. She's written several other contemporary fantasy and young adult novels, as well as upwards of 80 short stories, two of which have been finalists for the Hugo Award. She's a contributor to the Wild Cards series of shared world superhero books edited by George R. R. Martin and a graduate of the Odyssey Fantasy Writing Workshop. An Air Force brat, she survived her nomadic childhood and managed to put down roots in Boulder, Colorado.


Related to Kitty and The Midnight Hour

Related Audiobooks

Related Articles


Reviews

What people think about Kitty and The Midnight Hour

3.8
117 ratings / 104 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    And now we talk about me and my thoughts. As I do. We're going to start with what I really did not like. Kitty herself says it when she says that if she and Carl (her pack alpha) were human she'd be encouraged to leave him because his behavior toward her is abuse. She's the youngest werewolf in the pack, she eats last, she has no standing, she's at the bottom of the hierarchy. It's... squicky. It's okay for wolves in the wild, I've watched the documentaries, I get all that, but Kitty is a human, at least until she changes into a wolf, and it really is abuse. Carl tells her what to do, who to see, slaps her around, and ends it with sex. I can't tell you how not okay with that I am, and how happy I am that by the end Kitty had learned to stand up to him and left the pack, because I would not have been coming back for more if that was going to continue.

    It bothered me that with all the emphasis on wolf behavior that in the end Meg, the alpha's wife and the alpha female, used very human means to get what she wanted. Very unwolflike. She didn't fight, she didn't even respect her mate. It is wolves that mate for life, isn't it? I think it is. If you want your werewolves to act like wolves, then fine, but you really should not use that excuse to make with the sex and humiliation for Kitty (it smacks of plot device, btw, not kinky sex because it isn't overly detailed) and then throw aside the wolf behaviors when it suits your plot to do that. It works to a degree for Kitty while she attempts to reconcile her human and werewolf sides, but it does not work for the alpha female who has long since reconciled these sides.

    I ended up liking Kitty very much. She's got some things to deal with and she knows that. Her current strengths become even more obvious when you learn the story of how she became a werewolf and how she wasn't truly adult or independent at that time. She then went straight to the pack and depended upon them for everything. She's got a hard road now and I'm interested in seeing how she makes out with that.

    I'm torn about Cormac. He could end up being a great character, he could end up being cheesetastic and lame. He and Kitty are right now on the same side, and that's good, they have some sexual tension which could be played on, but he's also a supernatural executioner and they met because he was hired to kill her. Problematic. They got over it awfully easily, and I'm not so sure that's great. Iffy, as I said.

    Love the radio show idea. I kept waiting for Kitty's revelation to backfire or to just be more than it was. I would have thought people would have doubted her or wanted to kill the mutie freak, but neither happened. I didn't feel as if I had enough from the book to have that make sense to me. Right now the universe is aware of supernatural beings and seems to be accepting them, but it happened so fast.

    The interview with the author of the vampire books cracked me right the fuck up. OH HAI THAR ANNE RICE. Bwah! Vaughn did this great thing at the end of that interview and turned a skewering of a popular author into a touching moment and I think that might have been when I started to like this book.

    Kitty's producer and her sound guy--Ozzy and Tom???--could have been fleshed out more, but I liked them because Kitty liked them and because she thinks of them as "the pack you make." Yep, that's my thing, that's what gets me. I'll be continuing with the series.
  • (3/5)
    5/2016 1 Star - So I started reading this book and really couldn't get over how weak Kitty is... I only made it through a couple of chapters before I had to stop. I like strong women characters, I also don't like the whole Alpha can do whatever with whomever whenever type of romantic story line (not really romantic)
    I just can't get into it. so I won't probably finish.

    6/2018 3.5 Stars - so I reread this book at the urging of a friend I still didn’t like how the alphas treated kitty. Not teaching someone how to defend themselves is a poor way to protect someone. I did enjoy how she grew but I still wanted her to kick everyone’s butt and not be so submissive.
  • (3/5)
    Short version: I wish that I could say that I loved this book from start to finish, but I can't. I was frustrated with Kitty's weakness for much of the book, and it was only toward the end that I started to really get her. That's not to say that it was a bad book (it wasn't) or that I hated it until the end (I didn't), it's just that I'm a character reader, and I need characters to make sense. Unfortunately, to me, the characters and the "paranormal hierarchy" just didn't make sense until close to the end.

    After finishing the book, I think it makes a little more sense as to why Kitty would behave the way she did for so long... but I feel like the explanation should have come earlier in the story... It would have lent a validity to Kitty's dependency and need for protection that I felt was missing.

    Oh, I almost forgot. When Kitty shifts into her wolf, the narrative changes to 3rd person, which was just weird. I didn't really care for that aspect at all. It just felt out of place and awkward - like it was completely separate from Kitty herself, rather than a part of her.

    I did feel that there was a lot of growth to the main character though, which I appreciated, and that overall I liked this well enough to continue the series - but it was far from perfect. I did like Cormac, so I'm hoping we see more of him going forward.


    (Fair Warning! I'll just say now that there shall be spoilerish rantings and stuff ahead, so continue at your own risk.)


    Long version: So, Kitty is a puppy. She's a werewolf at the bottom of her pack's peculiar pecking order. Completely submissive to, and completely dependent on, her pack and alpha to keep her safe. Safe from what, you ask?



    You see... Kitty was date-raped, and when she fled from the dick who did it, she had the crappy luck to be found by a werewolf and bitten, and thus turned herself. The werewolf's pack took Kitty in, promising her security and safety... and then kinda proceeded to continue violating her for the next 3 years. I use the term 'violate' here in just about every way. As Alpha, one can pretty much have run of the pack without any consequences at all, so there's more rape**. But she was also abused and terrorized by the Alpha and other members of the pack, kept in a constant state of fear and submission and powerlessness. So not only was her body violated, but her trust and her identity and EVERYTHING was violated.

    Some pack. There's no order, no consistency, no security - none of the stuff that a good pack provides. Instead, being the lowest ranked member, Kitty lived in unending fear of being picked on, or beat up, or in trouble... so she coped by being completely submissive to everyone above her. It's give all control to those higher than you, or nothing. In any other relationship, that would be considered physical, sexual, and emotional abuse.

    (** Kitty didn't see it that way - she thought that was normal pack behavior, and the submissive wolf in her worshiped her Alpha. She didn't know better. It was only when she found a sense of place outside the pack that she began to see that shit was fucked up.)

    So coming back to the "What were the pack protecting her from?" question... My answer is "independence". Though they'd have you believe it was from vampires, or other humans... big spiders... vicious kittens... whatever.

    So, Kitty finds her place outside the pack, with her radio show, and proceeds to remember that she is not just pack puppy, but also a person. This creates all the drama you'd expect from alpha tyrants who don't like to be told no. Kitty does a lot of cringing, because the part of her who has lived as the pack puppy for 3 years feels she should, but the woman part of Kitty is like "Fuck that." And I say GOOD. The problem is that Kitty's only saying it in her head... she's afraid to make a move to go along with the thought... she's too used to having the pack behind her. And to that I say, "Shit or get off the pot, girl."

    She eventually does, and there are some interesting plot twists and turns that, while predictable, were still decent. Nothing was really resolved, but that's what the rest of the series is for, I guess.

    Still... despite my annoyance with the above stuff, I did like the book, and will continue on with the series at some point, now that Kitty has a backbone and is willing and able to stand up for herself.
  • (4/5)
    Blasted through this thing in a single sitting--I had no interest in putting it down. I really loved the excerpts from Kitty's radio show; they never felt trite and they never got old. I love the balance Kitty learned to strike between fight and flight/making yourself small and hoping "they" don't go after you.

    The whole story is a wonderful, speculative take on a young woman growing up, learning to take care of herself, and leaving behind bad relationships and situations. I love that her independence stems from her radio show, how her job was dead-end until she had some fun with it and then it basically saved her life, financially and emotionally. Every woman needs that, and I love seeing it reflected in fiction.
  • (3/5)
    This was a fun read.
  • (4/5)
    I'd give it 4.5 stars if I could. :)
  • (4/5)
    Kitty is a radio DJ in Denver who just happens to be a werewolf. When someone calls in and she starts giving otherworldly advice, a late-night show for vampires, werewolves and the like becomes "The Midnight Hour." But Kitty's new show isn't popular with everyone - a bigwig vampire named Arturo talks her pack leader Karl into telling her to stop, and someone's out for Kitty's life.I'm not sure quite what to make of this first book in the series, though I think much of my trouble comes from listening to it as an audiobook. I'm just not an aural learner, so it takes longer for me to "read" through and I miss more details. The premise was interesting, the story compelling, and explaining werewolf pack and vampire family dynamics was decent worldbuilding, though at the same time entirely messed up. I liked Kitty as a character and seeing her come into her own, though some of the scenes were too violent for my taste. A promising start for fans of urban paranormal fantasy series.
  • (3/5)
    It feels refreshing to have a book focusing on a werewolf instead of a vampire in urban fantasy. I'm liking the establishment of character in the first two chapters, plus revealing at least one antagonist. The author created a unique world, which is also nice. It was fun to watch her grow as her radio show grows, as the book progresses. So often the protagonist isn't the one changing in these books.The first third felt strong. The next third of the book, the plot became very diffuse. I honestly had trouble finding anything more than her internal struggles. Pack politics seems rather understated, all things considered. The radio show, which was the big plot device, has fallen to a lesser position. And what's with Cormac the bounty hunter and our happy little wolf going vixen on him ? The addition of the vamps seems like an editorial suggestion of "if you have any super, you have to have them all." I hate editorial meddling of that nature.This definitely felt like a story where the pack Omega becomes stronger than expected and throws the pack out of sorts. Which usually also creates more plot lines for future books.Again I come across details placed too late in the book to make them not seem like "OMG! REALLY?!" type reveals. You didn't get a full sense of the character's animosity until past the half way point. Or even hints of her duplicitous nature. This doesn't work well when one wants to point the finger as the first book's main protagonist. In fact, it makes it feel like a sudden left turn. It might add a few pages but the extra plot hints would be worth it.The last twenty five pages or so bring the focus back to the plot, moving us to a conclusion. It felt like a good, strong ending, with many possibles. With all this did, I'd love to give this more than three stars but it just doesn't get that high for me. Thankfully, this is book one. Can't wait to see where we go from here.
  • (3/5)
    A good read...but I hated how submissive Kitty got around the alpha male. Good thing she got over that!
  • (2/5)
    I almost stopped reading this book about 1/3 of the way through, but I'm glad I stuck with it. I found the submission/humiliation parts so distasteful and I'm really glad that was an element the author stopped pushing later in the book. The premise was pretty shaky, and the story was uneven, but I liked the general idea of the series. Giving the second book a try to see if it's worth sticking with the author.
  • (4/5)
    vampires & werewolves walk among us, and the real world is about to find out about the hidden one. nothing totally groundbreaking in this book - if you've read the worlds written by kelley armstrong or patricia briggs before, you've got the concept down - but that's not a bad thing. this one's just as good as those other very nice entries into the urban fantasy genre, and if you like them, you'll like this one. an easy writing voice, a likable heroine, and an engagingly gritty plot that doesn't offer sunsiney promises that everyone's going to get out of this unscathed: quite good.
  • (4/5)
    I really loved this book. Head and shoulders above a lot of supernatural fiction that has become trendy at the moment. It is immensely readable and hard to put down. The heroine is very likable, and her struggles between her radio show and her desire to just keep her head down and be part of the pack are engaging and realistic. The wearwolves feel foreign and lupin in a convincing way. It is quite adult though - the subject and tone comes across as very YA to start with, but then the story is surprisingly bleak in places. It does feel like it's setting up for a longer series, and leaves one of the key plots hanging, but then it _is_ setting up for a longer series, so there we go. A series I am looking forward to reading.
  • (4/5)
    I know.... I know... Kitty's tolerance of physical and sexual abuse was an intentional part of the story and, to be fair, Vaughn did this very well - i.e. unlike many (too many) other writers in this genre who write rape/coercion like it's romance, the abuse in this story was certainly presented as abuse, not romance. Someone compared Kitty with Rachel Morgan and, surprisingly, I have to agree. If you liked Harrison's Morgan series, you'll probably like this book too: the tone is similar, the main characters are similar, even the plot is sort of similar (well, not the plot so much as the theme of "main character trying to find herself and her place among her peers/friends as she grows in strength/awareness")And that sorta sums up the plot. It's about 2/3 an exploration of Kitty's life/growth and 1/3 an investigation into what might happen in (our current) world where werewolves are discovered to be real. We are not left hanging at the end of the book, but there is enough left unresolved that you'll be curious to see what Kitty gets up to in the next installment. I quite liked it and plan to read the rest of the series.
  • (4/5)
    A fun, fast read, although with a bit of a formulaic feel to it. As the first book in its series, a lot of it is an introduction to this world, and the first subplot (a serial killer) is pretty incidental to the main story. But I liked how the second subplot, centering on the mysterious Elijah Smith, sound like it's going to be developed slowly over several books. Kitty is a likable character, and Vaughn does a fine job of showing how running her own radio show lets her grow and develop confidence. And a bonus point for having a cop character who's A) female and B) willing to believe in the supernatural!
  • (3/5)
    Interesting enough to read on vacation, but not interesting enough to read the next book in the series.
  • (3/5)
    Kitty Norville is the host of her own late night radio show called "The Midnight Hour". Her shtick is to provide advice to those suffering from the woes of vampirism and lycanthropy. Oh yeah, and Kitty is a werewolf. I was hoping for a fun, witty, urban fantasy novel, but instead I was given a flat and uninteresting "mystery". I am done with this series after book numero uno.
  • (4/5)
    I read a lot of urban fantasy, but there are still a number of best selling series I just haven't had a chance to read yet. I recently read one of Vaughn's short stories in the Hexed anthology and enjoyed it immensely, and that gave me the proper push to finally grab this from my to-read pile.There are a lot of tropes here that are a big reason why I didn't read it for so long. Vampires? Yawn. Werewolves? Meh. Those types of supernaturals aren't my sort of thing, anyway, so a book really needs something special to grab me if it has those recycled elements. The biggest draw here: Kitty. She has a great voice. Smart and snarky, but not overbearing. I loved the radio show segments. She's the perfect DJ, dishing out common sense to her supernatural callers.One of the biggest turn-offs: the werewolf pack dynamics. I know they were supposed to be regarded as a negative, all that toxic in-fighting, but certain psychological elements made my skin crawl in a way that gory bodies did not. As I read, I kept thinking, "If these characters are in the rest of the series, I definitely don't want to read on, or all this manipulation will make me angry in a bad way." Fortunately, by the end the dynamics change considerably.I already have the third book, and at this point I would be willing to get book two and read onward. It won't be a high priority for me, but there's something compelling about Kitty, and I can't help but wonder how things develop since it's such a long series.
  • (3/5)
    I listened to the narration of Kitty and the Midnight Hour. I was expecting to not be impressed and walk away from this series believing it was just another take on an overdone theme. After all, the series is about werewolves and vampires -- hasn't this theme been done before? But I was pleasantly surprised with Kitty and I plan to continue on to the next book ... sometime. But I won't be rushing to read it or listen to it. Kitty is the main character and I liked her well enough. Kitty is not like Mercy, Elena, or even Riley. While she is a werewolf, she is not a tough ass-kicking she-wolf. Instead, she is at the bottom of her pack, typically submissive and she takes self-defense classes to work on her fighting skills. The side characters of TJ, Carl and Cormac were interesting and rounded out Kitty's world somewhat. There is a unique setup with a love interest that is not ideal, beauitful or romantic -- usually not a path taken in this genre. I was able to put this book down (or rather turn it off since I was listening to it). The narration was decent and the storyline was okay. But nothing about it compelled me to go on. A negative for me with Kitty, which likely contributed to my lack of investment in the story, is that not enough time was spent developing Kitty's character. There is barely anytime spent with Kitty alone; she is always reacting or acting. There is not enough of her outside of the action. I would have preferred more character development, hopefully the next books do this a little bit more.
  • (3/5)
    This reads very much like a first novel. It felt a little stilted, yet there appears to be a lot of potential for this author and for this series. I look forward to finding out what happens to Kitty and all the other paranormal creatures of the night that have just been outed.
  • (3/5)
    Not my favorite paranormal novel. I just couldn't get into the characters.
  • (4/5)
    I was introduced to the Kitty Norville series with the eighth book in the series Kitty Goes to War. Normally, I wouldn't begin a series with such a recent book but I had received it for review and didn't have time to read the seven previous books in the series. The book was great and I wasn't too lost even without having the background information from earlier books.I finally just got around to reading Kitty and The Midnight Hour, the first book in the series. Based on the first book and the eighth book, this is definitely a series that I want to catch up on and continue.Kitty and the Midnight Hour sets up Kitty's world and her place in it. Her personal struggles with being a werewolf are clearly evident even as she endeavors to assist other supernaturals on her late night talk radio show. When she is called in to assist in a police investigation, the publicity escalates conflict within her pack and with the local vampire family. Has Kitty taken on more than she can handle?Vaughn weaves several different plot lines into this first book and at times I thought there were too many. I can see that each one is a set up for further stories in the series but there were times that threads were being lost only to have them pop up again in what seemed to be a random part of the story. It just seemed like a lot when also introducing characters and creating a world which Vaughn does very well.My favorite parts of the book were when I learned about Kitty as a person and not necessarily all the action surrounding her. It was interesting to read this book after reading the eighth because I can see how much Kitty grows and changes throughout the books. I really want to see how she develops from a werewolf at the bottom of the pack into an alpha in her own right.Overall, I can see development in the writing from this book to that one as well and that makes me more eager to continue on with the series. I think Kitty and The Midnight Hour is a good start to the series but the books will only get better.
  • (4/5)
    This is one of the series I have enjoyed reading over the past couple of years. I have always enjoyed this series because Kitty is the unlikely hero. It makes Kitty an appealing character and really easy to identify with as she progress through the series. Another reason why I really like this series is that it's just simply put, an enjoyable read. The writing is really witty and Kitty's personality in general makes me giggle. It makes this series the perfect books to pick up when you just want to sit down, relax, have a good laugh, and enjoy a good story. This is one of those books where it is really easy to just sit down for a few hours and read it from cover to cover.But enough about the series and on to the specifics of this particular book. You're introduced to Kitty, who is a werewolf and a werewolf at the bottom of pack ranks. She has a job on a local radio station and accidentally finds herself with her own radio show after being bored one night and hosting an impromptu late night talk show about the supernatural.This radio show really brings Kitty into her own, as a reader you can track Kitty growing into her own in both her professional life as well as within the pack. As a fairly new werewolf, Kitty has not really been involved in the inner workings of the pack, and throughout this book she finds that everything she thought about the pack was not necessarily true, and that she might really need to be watching her back more.There are a lot of elements about the book I really like. Like I mentioned before the book is really witty and funny in parts. Early on in the book an assassin (Cormac) who was hired to kill Kitty, calls into the show to announce this. Instead of doing what every sane person would do and run, Kitty carries on a conversation with this would be killer for several minutes, creating a very sarcastic and amusing bit of dialogue. This type of dialogue is spread out throughout the book, and offers a nice release of tension in moments of high suspense.I also like the other characters within the book. None of them play huge roles in this particular book (for me this book is really about establishing Kitty and revealing the world through her eyes). Even though no one side character stands out throughout the entire book, they all play important roles and together all play a big role in Kitty coming into her own. Cormac, the werewolf killer is brash in his actions and speech, but throughout the book he proves himself to be a genuinely good guy who is there for Kitty when she needs him to be. Hardin, the police detective, is both diligent in her job and willing to accept and learn about the things that go bump in the night.The pack dynamic is well, interesting to say the most. There seem to be a lot of crazy people in the pack, and Kitty's reaction to this is what you would expect, "how did I miss this before". I can't really talk to much about the pack in detail without giving a lot away about the book. I will say that T.J. is really a true friend to Kitty, and there relationship reminds me of older brother to younger sister, and really its quite sweet even when T.J. is upset with her.Vaughn really sets up the book for the sequels by exposing the reader to little bits and pieces of the supernatural, like the church cult and local vampire Family. Overall, I really like this book, it's one of those comfort books you pick up to read when you just need to escape. I would recommend it to just about anyone who enjoys Urban Fantasy.
  • (4/5)
    Kitty is a fantastic character - flawed and strong all at once. Great story!
  • (4/5)
    'Kitty and the Midnight Hour' tells the story of a werewolf lady as she contends with pack politics, menacing vampires and an increasingly popular radio show which goes in a direction she never expected.On the surface, it looks like another crappy urban fantasy adorned with a hot scantily clad chick. Don't let the cover turn you off! It's actually a fun read, with likeable, intriguing characters and an interesting setup. Some of the pack dynamics got a little annoying earlier in the book, and remained a bit confusing, but it didn't detract too much. Interestingly, the protagonist, Kitty, is at a radically different place in life at the end of the book than she was at the beginning, which is a good hook to get me interested in her future adventures. So overall some problems, but pretty fun and a quick read. Recommended for werewolf fans.
  • (4/5)
    These books hit just the right spot with me-- fun without being silly, balancing real world building and the issues that world would bring with an interesting, realistic cast of characters.
  • (3/5)
    Kitty is trying to maintain her humanity with a regular job and life, conceding to her werewolf nature only when she has no choice. As a late night DJ she finds herself becoming the agony aunt of the supernatural community. Both her wolf pack leader and the local vampire head of the family are less than impressed but Kitty, tired of being submissive and having to hide, ignores the threat and basically outs the supernatural community to the human world at large. When Kitty is targeted by Cormac, a supernatural slayer, she discovers that the threat is actually a lot more personal and (thankfully) this leads to Kitty pushing the boundaries of what is exepected of her.While it starts a little slow, Kitty and The Midnight Hour does develop into an entertaining read.
  • (5/5)
    This is a fantastic book! The main character is intelligent, relatable, and grows into her inner strength. This book is all about find her strength, and learning to make it on her own.
  • (3/5)
    fluffy but not bad little story; character jumped around in development a little more than made sense but I liked it
  • (4/5)
    First of a series. Kitty, a late-night DJ and secret werewolf, becomes a target for the preternatural community when she almost accidentally starts hosting a call-in show for vampires, werewolves etc. She comes to the attention of the police who are investigating a series of "animal attacks". Are these copycat killings by a wannabe-werewolf, or genuine lycanthrope attacks?
  • (2/5)
    I like urban fantasy with its female protagonists. Hey, I'm a big fan of Buffy after all. Too many in this genre run to formula I'll admit--down to the first person point of view. This isn't any exception--Kitty is a disc jockey/talk show host who also happens to be a werewolf and our narrator. I liked several aspects of this book at first and thought I'd wind up enjoying this. It had an interesting take on pack dynamics--Kitty in this book is struggling to remain human and her own person and to not be dominated by everyone else in the pack even though she's no alpha. Her "alpha" exerts a "right" to have sex with her at will and she's giving him kickbacks so he'll permit her to keep a job she loves. I found her efforts to change that dynamic and grow out of her role as a submissive "cub" interesting. But then... well, there's an assassination attempt on Kitty and: 1) The hit man warns her he's coming for her NOW on the air 2) She's able to talk him into standing down when he's nearly in sight. 3) She doesn't press charges. 4) The police let him go despite his on-air threats and confession he's a hired killer. 5) She develops an attraction for him! And at that point, about 100 pages in, I went "Oh, please" and stopped reading because even in a story about werewolves and vampires I don't want things to be utterly ridiculous.