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The Vatican's Exorcists: Driving Out the Devil in the 21st Century

The Vatican's Exorcists: Driving Out the Devil in the 21st Century

Written by Tracy Wilkinson

Narrated by Shelly Frasier


The Vatican's Exorcists: Driving Out the Devil in the 21st Century

Written by Tracy Wilkinson

Narrated by Shelly Frasier

ratings:
4/5 (19 ratings)
Length:
4 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Mar 12, 2007
ISBN:
9781400173792
Format:
Audiobook

Description

It is one of the most ancient, arcane, and to some, embarrassing rites of the Roman Catholic Church. Yet the number of priests in Italy trained as exorcists has risen tenfold over the past decade, and they are still unable to keep up with the skyrocketing demand for their services. Award-winning foreign correspondent Tracy Wilkinson reveals that "devil detox," as some call it, is a booming industry, complete with motivational speakers, international conventions, and plenty of controversy. At the center of this surprising movement is Father Gabriele Amorth, an energetic octogenarian who has spent decades leading a campaign to reestablish exorcism as a regularly performed rite of the Church. Through extensive interviews with him, as well as with highly placed Church officials, scientists, and ordinary Catholics, Wilkinson reveals the profound impact of this growing trend within both the Church hierarchy and the lay community.
Publisher:
Released:
Mar 12, 2007
ISBN:
9781400173792
Format:
Audiobook

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What people think about The Vatican's Exorcists

3.8
19 ratings / 6 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Very well written. Explains what an exorcism is really like and covers both sides of the argument. Explores a few different people extensively as they tell their story and same with the Exorcists themselves.
  • (3/5)
    This review of exorcism is a quick and easy read, and that is actually one of its downsides; it is superficial and incomplete. The author writes it like a magazine article (since she is a reporter, that probably isn't surprising), and simply reports, for the most part, the views of the people she interviews. Hard, investigative reporting is almost totally absent, and there is a brief skimming over analysis; in fact, the analysis could have been done by a college freshman writing a research paper on the project. The personal stories are interesting, but also superficial and breathlessly credulous. It's an interesting human interest story, but nothing more.
  • (3/5)
    This review of exorcism is a quick and easy read, and that is actually one of its downsides; it is superficial and incomplete. The author writes it like a magazine article (since she is a reporter, that probably isn't surprising), and simply reports, for the most part, the views of the people she interviews. Hard, investigative reporting is almost totally absent, and there is a brief skimming over analysis; in fact, the analysis could have been done by a college freshman writing a research paper on the project. The personal stories are interesting, but also superficial and breathlessly credulous. It's an interesting human interest story, but nothing more.
  • (4/5)
    This book was quite interesting. Not just due to the subject material but really Tracy Wilkinson gave us a complete background on the beliefs, the Church and various priests views on exorcisms. From chapter to chapter she breaks down by history, the exorcists, patients, cults, the church and of course, you can't leave out the opinions of the skeptics and shrinks. I've always enjoyed a good book that is basically nonfiction. This one was one of those. And really I still don't know whether I believe that people can be possessed. I guess I'm a skeptic, but I'm open minded enough to think that perhaps....just perhaps. But that's all Ms. Wilkinson is giving the reader, a chance to learn about what the church thinks about exorcisms and how they handle the various people that come to them for help. Then the stories that were written about a few of the patients. Really, each one is very different and can be construed in different ways, but if they believe and have faith in that, good for them.Very good book if you're interested in learning more about exorcisms and the history behind this mysterious form of faith, then go ahead and read this book. Then you can make your own conclusions!
  • (3/5)
    Finished this one a couple of weeks ago and just now getting around to journaling it. It was interesting but not quite as riveting as I had expected. The author does a fair job of remaining objective and presenting all sides of a complex issue. The most interesting parts, of course, were the case histories describing people who have seen exorcists.
  • (3/5)
    An interesting book, but very brief and superficial treatment of the subject. This is more a primer than a good look at exorcism. There are many books available that treat this subject in much greater detail, and with more of everything; psychological views, theological background, case histories, etc.A drawback to this book is its emphasis on roman catholic views and approach to exorcism, with very little information on other christian traditions and how they deal with the issue. For a book that is coming from this perspective, it contained only a smattering of roman catholic teaching and tradition on exorcism.A good introduction, but more an extended pamphlet than a treatment worth the trouble to print a whole book.