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Coraline

Coraline

Written by Neil Gaiman

Narrated by Neil Gaiman


Coraline

Written by Neil Gaiman

Narrated by Neil Gaiman

ratings:
4.5/5 (1,816 ratings)
Length:
3 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Nov 11, 2003
ISBN:
9780060735562
Format:
Audiobook

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Editor's Note

Delightfully dark…

Delightfully dark, Neil Gaiman’s tale of the curious, brave, and clever Coraline is sinister and suspenseful, yet filled with quirky charm. With the author’s own narration of his novella, the unforgettable Coraline comes to vivid life.

Description

The day after they moved in,
Coraline went exploring....

In Coraline's family's new flat are twenty-one windows and fourteen doors. Thirteen of the doors open and close.

The fourteenth is locked, and on the other side is only a brick wall, until the day Coraline unlocks the door to find a passage to another flat in another house just like her own.

Only it's different.

At first, things seem marvelous in the other flat. The food is better. The toy box is filled with wind-up angels that flutter around the bedroom, books whose pictures writhe and crawl and shimmer, little dinosaur skulls that chatter their teeth. But there's another mother, and another father, and they want Coraline to stay with them and be their little girl. They want to change her and never let her go.

Other children are trapped there as well, lost souls behind the mirrors. Coraline is their only hope of rescue. She will have to fight with all her wits and all the tools she can find if she is to save the lost children, her ordinary life, and herself.

Critically acclaimed and award-winning author Neil Gaiman will delight readers with his first novel for all ages.

Publisher:
Released:
Nov 11, 2003
ISBN:
9780060735562
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

NEIL GAIMAN was awarded the Newbery and Carnegie Medals for The Graveyard Book. His other books for younger readers include Coraline (which was made into an Academy-Award-nominated film) and The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish (which wasn’t). Born in England, he has won both the Hugo and Nebula Awards. You can learn more at www.mousecircus.com.



Reviews

What people think about Coraline

4.4
1816 ratings / 390 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Easy and quick read. Short story. A fun, and dark children literature.
  • (3/5)
    I know this is written for children, but even knowing that, this book was still just too fantastical and yet flat at the same time. However, both of my granddaughters love it. (Ages 8 and 12) There are parallel worlds that collide and Coraline must work to get her "real" parents back. 208 pages
  • (5/5)
    All of Gaiman's novels so far have been delightful, and this one is no exception. Coraline is putatively aimed at a younger market, the eight and up crowd, but that's no reason for an adult not to sneak into the children's section and pick it up anyway.

    Coraline Jones and her family have just moved into a flat in a big, old house. Two of the other flats are occupied, one by "the crazy old man" who tells her that he's training his mouse circus to perform for her, but the mice aren't ready yet, and the other by two old women, Miss Spink and Miss Forcible, retired actresses who keep some indeterminate number of aging Highland terriers. There's a fourth flat, that's still empty. There's a door in the drawing room of the Jones' flat that used to lead into the part of the house that's now the fourth, empty, flat, but now it only leads to the brick wall that was put up to divide the building when it was broken up into flats. However, there is still a key that unlocks that door to the brick wall.

    With all the adults around her affectionate but distracted--the retired actresses and the crazy old man even consistently call her Caroline, rather than Coraline--Coraline decides to explore. Her exploring leads her to try that door to the brick wall again, and this time there isn't a brick wall. There's a corridor, and Coraline goes down that corridor, and finds her "other mother" making lunch. Her "other mother" and "other father" are attentive, her other bedroom has a more interesting color scheme (though she privately concedes she wouldn't really want to sleep in the green and pink room.) There are pet rats, who sing a nasty little song, and a chestful of toys that seem strangely alive.

    When she goes outside, the neighborhood cat, whom she has been unable even to get close to, talks to her, and warns her to be careful.

    Everyone she meets, except the cat, has black button eyes.

    Coraline, being a sensible child, decides to go back to her own flat, despite the urging of her other mother to stay, and to allow her other mother to sew on her black button eyes so that she can stay forever. But when Coraline gets back to her own side, her parents are missing, and they don't come home, and she can't get anyone to take her seriously when she tells them her parents are missing--except the cat. Gradually, she realizes what has happened, and what she needs to do. This is a nicely scary little book. Strongly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    A sweet quick read, andif already sewn the movie, so no surprises. It's inventive and a little spooky but very charming, and I love Coraline's plucky exploration.
  • (4/5)
    Delightfully creepy. It took a few chapters to really grab me, but since I had seen the movie when it first came out in 2009 and had enjoyed that so much, I stuck with it. A very wise choice on my part.The book rounds Coraline out a lot more than the movie did. The film changed a few things from the book, most notably adding an entirely new character: Wybie. This is the second book I've read by Gaiman. He is incredibly talented at building suspense and delivering. I was honestly creeped out a few times by the vibe that Gaiman holds steady throughout the book. Also adding to the eeriness are some wonderful illustrations by Dave McKean sprinkled throughout the book. One of my favorite parts of the book was when Coraline retells the story of when her father sacrificed himself for her by choosing to be stung by several wasps while letting her run ahead so that she would be safe. The story illustrated that her father *did* love her (a fact not necessarily evident in the earlier chapters) and that Coraline understood how much her father loved her. The story ends with a line that perfectly sums up one of the main lessons in the book and one of the better quotes from the book: "When you're scared but you still do it anyway, that's brave."This book also had some fun, dark humor that I enjoyed. When trying to convince Coraline of her trustworthiness, The Other Mother swears on her mother's grave. Coraline asks if her mother has a grave: "Oh yes," said the other mother. "I put her in there myself. And when I found her trying to crawl out, I put her back."This was a quick, enjoyable read. Some children may find it too scary, but I know that when I was around 3rd or 4th grade, I would have probably loved this!Side note: I tried rewatching Coraline after reading the book. I couldn't finish it. I found Coraline's character insufferable after growing to love the book version of her. Perhaps I'll try it again after giving myself some time.
  • (4/5)
    This is a sort of marvelously creepy work, and I loved how understated the threats were in the beginning, and then the way Gaiman built upon the tension as things became more sinister. All told, I prefer his adult work, but I'd still recommend this as well worth exploring.