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War of the Worlds, The (A Graphic Novel Audio): Illustrated Classics

War of the Worlds, The (A Graphic Novel Audio): Illustrated Classics


War of the Worlds, The (A Graphic Novel Audio): Illustrated Classics

ratings:
4/5 (94 ratings)
Length:
24 minutes
Released:
Jan 1, 2006
ISBN:
9781612474632
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Do UFO's really exist? Could creatures from another planet visit Earth? In The War of the Worlds they do exist and the visitors from the planet Mars come to Earth with not so friendly intentions- to destroy our civilizations! Can humans stop these monstrous invaders before they destroy everything and everyone on Earth?
Released:
Jan 1, 2006
ISBN:
9781612474632
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Jessica Freeburg lives in Lakeville, MN, with her husband and three children. Her poetry and short stories have appeared in various magazines and anthologies. Her debut young-adult novel, Living in Shadows, was released in 2015. She has written several screenplays and enjoys working in film, writing, and producing documentaries focused on historical events that inspire her. You can visit her online at www.jessicafreeburg.com or follow her on Twitter: @jessicafreeburg.


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Reviews

What people think about War of the Worlds, The (A Graphic Novel Audio)

3.8
94 ratings / 109 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Loved this book. Bit slow and lengthy at times but a great plot and great theme to it. Hardcore sci fi right here. :)
  • (2/5)
    This was the fourth Wells novel I read, and definitely my least favorite. Everyone knows the story, whether from Orson Wells' radio broadcast or the multitudes of movie versions - Martians land on Earth to populate it, since Mars is becoming uninhabitable, and when all seems lost, are foiled due to Earth's bacteria. I fully expected it to be exciting, but it was dull and slow, and took me days to get through despite being a thin, tiny book.The main problem was the main character - what a boring, pompous, smug know-it-all. He thought he was superior to everyone he came across, and it made me want to strangle him. And then there was the snooze-worthy exposition on the biological makeup of the aliens and conjecture on the possible paths mankind's evolution might take. And finally there was the sheer coincidences - the main character just HAPPENS to be in the spot where the aliens first land after launching themselves from Mars and just HAPPENS to be where another pod falls later on, trapping him in a house and enabling him to view their work. And how stupid is the aliens' choice for a landing zone? Yes, let's conquer a world by landing all of our troops on a frickin' island.If you'd believe it, I was actually wishing for the appearance of Tom Cruise and Dakota Fanning.
  • (3/5)
    Interesting, but I prefer character-driven pieces.
  • (4/5)
    One of the earliest stories of conflict between man and extraterrestrial beings, written in 1898, this is a pretty extraordinary book. The narrator is unnamed, a writer of philosophy and in this story he expresses various points of philosophy. This book has never gone out of print and has remained popular. That is pretty extraordinary, too. This story is not big on characters and none of them have names. It is written as a factual telling of invasion and rule by Martians. This book presents science facts, technology and ecological points in its telling. Another theme is apocalypse. People feared the end of the age as 1899 drew closer. There is a mix of Christianity and such constructs as natural selection/Darwinism. At one point, it felt the narrator’s experience was like the experience of Noah disembarking the Ark to a world of destruction and carian with carian birds eating the dead. While there seems to be Christian themes in the book there is the characterization of the curate’s emotional weakness and self centeredness that resulted in the need to kill him (natural selection).
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this book.
  • (2/5)
    I suspect that my expectations of this classic science fiction novel might have been unduly stretched by recollections of listening to Jeff Wayne’s musical version from the late 1970s. Reading it now I found that the narrative from Wayne’s version seemed more imposing and eloquent than Wells’s rather pedestrian prose. That may just be a trick of the mind, though - I suppose that anything read out loud by Richard Burton would always have greater impact than words on a page.The story is a compelling one – towards the end of the nineteenth century a number of cylinders are launched from Mars and land at various sites through Surrey and the Home Counties of England. A crowd gathers to witness this spectacle and, after a considerable delay while the capsules to cool down from their perilous journey through Earth’s atmosphere, the Martians gradually appear. It is immediately apparent that this is not friendly foray with a view to establishing peaceful and mutually beneficial trade. The Martians have a death ray and deploy it liberally, causing the survivors to flee, and start a mass exodus from London.His prose may seem rather dry nowadays, but Wells knew how to tell a story. His characters seem very real and plausible, and he successfully blends the outlandish (i.e. an alien invasion) with the mundane aspects of life, adding verisimilitude to the story.
  • (4/5)
    A brilliant science fiction novel that captures well the tension in Europe of the time. With our current scientific knowledge it is relatively easy to pick holes in the plot but provided you can suspend your disbelief you are in for an enjoyable read.
  • (5/5)
    My dad taught me to read with a bunch of broken-spined sci-fi books, one being The War of the Worlds. Potentially problematic when you get down to the nitty gritty subject matter but it worked for us and thrust me solidly into geekdom. Thanks, Dad.

    Reading it for the first time all these years later, my five stars are a bit of a hodge podge of good memories and an impression of the unique and exciting material that was produced by Wells at a time when there wasn't really anything else like it. The five stars will remain and it's officially been added to my favorites list which, let's be honest, it always was.
  • (5/5)
    I was sure I’d read The War of the Worlds, because it’s one of those really famous and perpetually-referenced works of fiction that eventually just seeps into your brain by osmosis. I’m pretty sure I did read an abridged version in primary school, and I’ve read the excellent 2006 graphic novel Dark Horse put out, and I’ve seen the (greatly underrated) 2005 Spielberg film, and I’ve read Christopher Priest’s bizarre mash-up of it in The Space Machine. I know the plot pretty much off by heart. So it was with surprise that I recently realised I’d never actually read the original, unabridged novel.The Martians invade England, lay waste to the land with their tripod battle machines and deadly heat-ray, scatter the British military before them, and eventually die because of Terran bacteria. That’s the synopsis that everybody knows. But even if you think you know this story, it’s well worth reading, because unlike most 19th century classics it’s an absolute cracker of a book.One of the things I was most impressed by was Wells’ ability to develop a dreadful suspense, even though I knew precisely what was coming – and, you know, I’m sure even the readers at the time figured it out from the title. The War of the Worlds begins on a beautiful midsummer night in the London commuter town of Woking, amidst the utterly ordinary environment of the Victorian suburbs. (Incidentally, I enjoyed how the summer itself seemed a visceral part of the events – what is it about apocalyptic stories and summer? The Stand and the TV series The Walking Dead come to mind.) Strange conflagrations are witnessed by astronomers on the surface of Mars, and shortly afterwards, a falling star lands on the common near Woking. This moment in time – the beautifully written warm twilight of a Friday evening – is merely the beginning of a terrible destruction that will be wrought upon southern England.Alien invasion stories are a dime a dozen these days, but when Wells first wrote The War of the Worlds it was something completely new: one of the first hard science fiction novels, challenging notions about British (and indeed human) supremacy over the planet, and depicting the reactions of the characters to terrible events above and beyond them with stunning clarity. One the one hand, it’s fascinating to see how differently a apocalyptic event would have been a century ago, chiefly in how slowly the news travels – even the narrator remarks on how strange it is, a few hours after the first Martians incinerate dozens of people at the first landing site, for him to stumble terrified back into Woking and find that only a few miles away people are still going about their business. Likewise, the true gravity of the situation is slow to descend upon the citizens of the capital, chiefly because “the majority of people in London do not read Sunday papers.”Yet on the other hand, when the reality of the danger does sink in, Wells’ description of the panicked evacuation of six million people from London – one of the finest scenes in the novel – is weirdly modern. One might have expected a Victorian writer to fill it with acts of bravery, chivalry and decorum, but instead we see an ugly mass of people trampling over each other in their haste to escape.Had the Martians aimed only at destruction, they might on Monday have annihilated the entire population of London, as it spread itself slowly through the home counties. Not only along the road through Barnet, but also through Edgware and Waltham Abbey, and along the roads eastward to Southend and Shoeburyness, and south of the Thames to Deal and Broadstairs, poured the same frantic rout. If one could have hung that June morning in a balloon in the blazing blue above London every northward and eastward road running out of the tangled maze of streets would have seemed stippled black with the streaming fugitives, each dot a human agony of terror and physical distress. I have set forth at length in the last chapter my brother’s account of the road through Chipping Barnet, in order that my readers may realise how that swarming of black dots appeared to one of those concerned. Never before in the history of the world had such a mass of human beings moved and suffered together. The legendary hosts of Goths and Huns, the hugest armies Asia has ever seen, would have been but a drop in that current. And this was no disciplined march; it was a stampede–a stampede gigantic and terrible–without order and without a goal, six million people unarmed and unprovisioned, driving headlong. It was the beginning of the rout of civilisation, of the massacre of mankind.The various acts of panicked violence which follow are, to use the word again, modern – a realistic point of view I would have expected from a mid-century writer, not a Victorian. It’s enthralling stuff.It’s also an eerie book to read from a modern perspective, not least of all as we approach the centenary of World War I. That war was still sixteen years distant when The War of the Worlds was released, but it’s uncanny how many things Wells accurately predicted: the total warfare, the sacking of towns and cities, the armoured fighting machines, and – most disturbing of all – the indiscriminate use of chemical weapons. On the other hand, something a lot of people don’t know about The War of the Worlds is that in Wells’ fictional universe, there are actually humans living alongside the Martians on Mars, albeit as slaves and food sources. This is only mentioned once, and it’s hard to tell whether it’s poetic license on Wells’ part or whether he thought that might be a genuine scientific possibility. Either way, it seems odd compared to how prescient the rest of the book was.It’s hard to overstate just how much of an impact this novel had on the rest of the century’s science fiction. Even the final chapters, as the narrator walks across a deserted London – a scene that feels almost cinematic in its use of noise and silence – no doubt influenced the opening of John Wyndham’s classic The Day of the Triffids, which in turn was the inspiration for the film 28 Days Later, and so on and so forth. And I can’t stress enough just how madly, horribly inventive and compelling every part of this book is: the crowd gathered around the first cylinder at sunset on a hot summer’s day, the image of a Martian tripod striding down the Thames past the Houses of Parliament, the panicked flight of millions of Londoners, the devastated countryside choked with alien red weed, the derelict tripod on Primrose Hill dripping with “lank shreds of brown.” The War of the Worlds is an absolute classic of literature, and if you think you know the story and don’t need to read the book, think again. And, of course, it’s in the public domain and you can read it for free, so there’s no excuse not to.
  • (5/5)
    This is a classic that anyone even slightly interested in SF should read. Don't read it completely literally. Keep in mind the themes that it is espousing in its dated, stilted manner. It's short & has spawned so many spin-offs & hype that ignorance of what Wells actually wrote is a pity. There is a lot more to this novel than just first alien contact or apocalypse. The man(soldier)-in-the-street POV & our salvation inspire a lot of thought even today - make that especially today. Yes, parts are dated, but overall it's an amazingly enduring story that shows our racial egotism off for what it is.
  • (3/5)
    A tale of two halves. An excellent, attention-grabbing opening which gradually deteriorates into an uninteresting and contrived mess made for skimming.

    What I loved:

    tantalizing foreshadowing
    And invisible to me because it was so remote and small, flying swiftly and steadily towards me across that incredible distance , drawing nearer every minute by so many thousands of miles, came the Thing they were sending us, the Thing that was to bring so much struggle and calamity and death to the earth.

    the arrogance of man believing he is alone in the universe
    Yet so vain is man, and so blinded by his vanity, that no writer, up to the very end of the nineteenth century, expressed any idea that intelligent life might have developed there far, or indeed at all, beyond its earthly level.

    realistic emotional responses ranging from terror, panic and post-traumatic stress from witnessing the horrors of war to determined attempts to ignore and deny this frightening new reality
    “It’s a movin’,” he said to me as he passed; “a-screwin’, and a-screwin’ out. I don’t like it . I’m a-goin’ ’ome, I am.”

    Suddenly , like a thing falling upon me from without, came— fear. With an effort I turned and began a stumbling run through the heather. The fear I felt was no rational fear, but a panic terror not only of the Martians, but of the dusk and stillness all about me. Such an extraordinary effect in unmanning me it had that I ran weeping silently as a child might do.

    At times I suffer from the strangest sense of detachment from myself and the world about me; I seem to watch it all from the outside, from somewhere inconceivably remote, out of time, out of space, out of the stress and tragedy of it all.

    intimate brushes with death

    I staggered through the leaping, hissing water towards the shore. Had my foot stumbled, it would have been the end.

    graphic imagery
    It was as if each man were suddenly and momentarily turned to fire. Then, by the light of their own destruction, I saw them staggering and falling, and their supporters turning to run.

    ...enormous volume of heavy, inky vapour, coiling and pouring upward in a huge and ebony cumulus cloud, a gaseous hill that sank and spread itself slowly over the surrounding country. And the touch of that vapour, the inhaling of its pungent wisps, was death to all that breathes.

    They did not eat, much less digest. Instead, they took the fresh living blood of other creatures, and injected it into their own veins.

    The man was running away with the rest, and selling his papers for a shilling each as he ran— a grotesque mingling of profit and panic.

    I put out my hand and felt the meat chopper hanging to the wall. In a flash I was after him. I was fierce with fear. Before he was halfway across the kitchen I had overtaken him. With one last touch of humanity I turned the blade back and struck him with the butt. He went headlong forward and lay stretched on the ground. I stumbled over him and stood panting. He lay still.

    men clutching at religion
    “Why are these things permitted? What sins have we done? The morning service was over, I was walking through the roads to clear my brain for the afternoon, and then— fire, earthquake, death! As if it were Sodom and Gomorrah! All our work undone, all the work— What are these Martians?”

    ...

    “Be a man!” said I. “You are scared out of your wits! What good is religion if it collapses under calamity? Think of what earthquakes and floods, wars and volcanoes, have done before to men! Did you think God had exempted Weybridge? He is not an insurance agent.”

    Hahaha!


    cold hard comparisons between the relationship between Martians and man and man and the animals
    And we men, the creatures who inhabit this earth, must be to them at least as alien and lowly as are the monkeys and lemurs to us.


    And before we judge of them too harshly we must remember what ruthless and utter destruction our own species has wrought, not only upon animals, such as the vanished bison and the dodo, but upon its inferior races.

    “It’s bows and arrows against the lightning, anyhow,” said the artilleryman.

    Did they grasp that we in our millions were organised, disciplined, working together? Or did they interpret our spurts of fire, the sudden stinging of our shells, our steady investment of their encampment, as we should the furious unanimity of onslaught in a disturbed hive of bees? Did they dream they might exterminate us?

    “This isn’t a war,” said the artilleryman. “It never was a war, any more than there’s war between man and ants.”

    the artilleryman's postulating on the post-apocalyptic rebuilding of society
    And we form a band— able-bodied, clean-minded men. We’re not going to pick up any rubbish that drifts in. Weaklings go out again.”

    ...

    Able-bodied, clean-minded women we want also— mothers and teachers. No lackadaisical ladies—no blasted rolling eyes. We can’t have any weak or silly. Life is real again, and the useless and cumbersome and mischievous have to die. They ought to die. They ought to be willing to die. It’s a sort of disloyalty , after all, to live and taint the race.

    actual science in this science fiction
    In particular I laid stress on the gravitational difficulty. On the surface of the earth the force of gravity is three times what it is on the surface of Mars. A Martian, therefore, would weigh three times more than on Mars, albeit his muscular strength would be the same. His own body would be a cope of lead to him.

    Apparently the vegetable kingdom in Mars, instead of having green for a dominant colour, is of a vivid blood-red tint. At any rate, the seeds which the Martians (intentionally or accidentally) brought with them gave rise in all cases to red-coloured growths. Only that known popularly as the red weed, however, gained any footing in competition with terrestrial forms.

    As you can probably tell, all of these things I highlighted with a fervor on my Kindle.

    What I didn't appreciate was the contrived and rather dull nature of the latter half of the story, most of which I skimmed. Meeting the artilleryman again miles and days away from where and when they first met - the odds of that are infinitesimal, the aliens abruptly dying from Earth's alien bacteria, the narrator's wife not only surviving but is reunited with her husband. And why was the narrator's brother's point of view given? We never see the brothers together. He's just a stranger to us as the reader.

    However, I did raise my eyebrows at these unintentional funnies:

    'cockchafer' - apparently this is a beetle but that's not what came to mind when I saw it.

    His landlady came to the door, loosely wrapped in dressing gown and shawl; her husband followed ejaculating.

    Er, what? That's a bit spicy.



    I was initially impressed by this classic. Unfortunately the ending left me disappointed.
  • (5/5)
    I love H.G. Wells. I read his works when I was young, but I was to young to appreciate it. It was hard for me to conceive then of the panic that would have occurred in 1938.

    This is a brief little book that begins with a radio broadcast of Earth being invaded by Martians. The survivors are few and far between. It is an entertaining read that I highly recommend to anyone who enjoys short stories and sci-fi suspension of reality for a short time.
  • (3/5)
    Never before in the history of the world had such a mass of human beings moved and suffered together. The legendary hosts of Goths and Huns, the hugest armies Asia has ever seen, would have been but a drop in that current. And this was no disciplined march; it was a stampede--a stampede gigantic and terrible--without order and without a goal, six million people, unarmed and unprovisioned, driving headlong. It was the beginning of the rout of civilisation, of the massacre of mankind. Pg. 82The War of the Worlds is rather a misnomer as it didn't play out as war. Not even close. It was an one sided annihilation and unfortunately, man was on the short end of the stick in this battle. Aliens from Mars have arrived and their purpose seems to be the complete destruction of London and the surrounding countryside. All efforts to counterattack have proven futile and men are forced to hide and run like rats, like vermins, the lowliest of the lows. Salvation seems a miracle while the extinction of the human race, inevitable. My first taste of Wells was rather hit and miss. Miss in that there were way too many references to places that I've never heard of before. They are most likely real places, but I wouldn't know either way. It was like a study of all the smallest and tiniest locales surrounding London and I was in desperate need of a map. The hit was the actual aliens themselves. Perhaps if there was more of a focus on the aliens, their thoughts, their motives, instead of the all places they destroyed, it would have made for a more interesting read. Either way, I haven't given up on Mr Wells and hopefully his next book will leave a more lasting impression.
  • (4/5)
    Perhaps one of the most interesting things about this book was the fact that Wells did not describe what an alien looked like until page 99.

    I was attracted to this book because I knew what a stir Orson Well's adaptation made: this book is well known, but I'd never read it. I found myself almost all the way through and realizing I didn't know how it ended. Do the humans live, or do Martians win?

    It took me longer than I would have liked to read it, but once I devoted myself to it, it didn't take long. This was much better than The Island of Dr. Moreau , and I am interested in reading more [author: H. G. Wells].

    I'm ready to hear/read the Orson Wells version now...then maybe watch the movie.
  • (5/5)
    Loved this book. Bit slow and lengthy at times but a great plot and great theme to it. Hardcore sci fi right here. :)
  • (3/5)
    The War of the Worlds - H. G. Wells ***I left it a few weeks before I reviewed WOTW to see if I would change my mind about this book. I haven't.I think most people by now know the story of Martian's landing in London and creating havoc and death. The novel is written in the first person by an unnamed narrator (something I usually enjoy). We follow his journey from when the aliens first land all the way through to their eventual demise.The book is approaching 120 years old, so I anticipated that it may be more than a little dated, but this hasn't bothered me with other classics from the same era. For some reason, and I can't put my finger on it, War of the Worlds just really failed to engage with me. Very rare do I find reading a book a chore but this was one of those occasions. I fully understand the foresight shown by Wells and the way he used and described scientific information must have been really revolutionary for the time, and because of this I can see why it is still revered today. But for me it didn't work. I found the plot extremely monotonous and at times just wishing the narrator would get zapped by the heat ray. On more than one occasion I felt like I was reading an AA route planner as we constantly get told the place names he is travelling through (which would probably help if I knew my way around London, but I don't). The house scenario really detracted from the flow of the plot and just seemed a slog through, that twist for me was a little unbelievable (even more so than being invaded by Martians) and although it allowed Wells a chance to include a little segment of horror, the whole concept of the curate and narrator being imprisoned for 2 weeks was a step too far for me.I know many people are screaming at me right now, telling me to look deeper into the novel, examine how the appearance of the Martians has the potential to reflect humanities own future or how Britain at the time was an empire crushing many parts of the globe and War of the worlds could be seen as a vision or warning of our own fate. I have to agree that all these themes (and many more) are there for the reader, but I have to be fully absorbed in the plot to want to dig that little bit deeper. In reality my enjoyment would only warrant a one star rating, but that wouldn't be fair. The book did have it's moments of brilliance and I would be the first one to put my hand in the air and admit that it is more down to my personal taste rather than the novel, you only have to see the hundreds of 5 star reviews for this. I wish I had liked it, I really do, I tried my best, but 3 stars is the most I can offer.Has it put me off reading further H G Wells novel? Not really, possibly just lowered my expectations. Maybe the next one I choose will be one where I haven't heard the story before so hopefully the writing and events will be totally fresh.
  • (4/5)
    For Christmas, I ordered an mp3 player (Library of Classics) that was pre-loaded with 100 works of classic literature in an audio format. Each work is in the public domain and is read by amateurs, so the quality of the presentation is hit or miss.War of the Worlds is H.G. Wells’s classic story of a Martian invasion, centered in the London area. When viewed with an eye from the period in which it was written, the story is magnificent. More impressively, in this day of blockbuster science fiction thrillers with CGI graphics and virtually unlimited budgets, it has aged surprisingly well.Having seen the recent adaptation starring Tom Cruise, and having read stories of the panic it caused when aired on radio in the mid-20th century (read by Orson Welles in the first person, causing many to believe it was actual, live news), I was not unfamiliar with its history and basic story outline. All in all, still quite a good story.
  • (4/5)
    Wells can really write. Some of the passages were awesome. Even though I am not an expert on London geography, I was able to get the feeling the book tried to convey. Actually, I believe that the use of so many know places (for Londoners) gives the book more credibility, together with the scientific details. Despair and the feeling of lostness is portrayed marvelously.
  • (3/5)
    Although I am a big fan of his works, personally I thought The War of the Worlds was disappointing. Every Wells' book has its moments, and his easy reading style is always a pleasure. Nonetheless, the story line was quite simplistic, with Wells making little attempt to add "science" to the "fiction." I was particularly surprised by Wells worn out ending which resulted in his wife miraculously returning from the Martians' onslaught with no absolutely explanation. Wells can do better, and did in other works.
  • (3/5)
    The War of the Worlds 3/5All you classic fans with probably trial me as a witch after this review haha however, I liked this book, i didn't enjoy it as much as The Time Machine or Island of Dr Moreau though. I think i had high expectations because i've seen 'the film' and it was a surprise to find out the book was nothing like the film at all so was expecting a much more in depth story. It was good but i did prefer the story in the film sadly. The idea is very original and the story as a whole is good, it just wasn't as gripping for me as the time machineor the island of Dr Moreau
  • (5/5)
    H.G. Wells' gift to Halloween
  • (5/5)
    There is little new that can be said about this classic SF novel, the first great invasion of Earth novel published by the father of the genre in 1898, and the precursor for so many that have followed since. This is, of course, a re-read, prompted by my having recently got into the mood by listening to Jeff Wayne's musical version, and watching both the 1953 George Pal film version (with excellent special effects for the time) and the 2005 Stephen Spielberg one (much better than I remembered from my first viewing). The description is dramatic and the imagery vivid, and in 1898 this would have been very graphic and, aside from the obvious features of the historical period, much of this reads like more recent science fiction novels in its uncompromising description of death, destruction and the worst of human behaviour as the massive tide of humanity escapes from the oncoming Martian war machines and their deadly heat-rays. The narrator, his wife and his brother are unnamed, as are the artilleryman and the curate, and there are very few named characters except for the astronomer Ogilvy and one or two others at the very beginning. This allows Wells to focus on the driving narrative. It is very short, only 141 pages, but this shows how a great novel does not need to be many hundreds of pages long. Tremendous stuff.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoy the Orson Welles' Mercury Theater radio transcript quite a great deal, but this was boring in comparison. It feels more like a scientific observational record written in a poetic manner (think the British Romantic poets - Keats, Wordsworth, Blake, Byron - all reserved, yet flowery observation) than a personal/emotional memoir. The Romanticism style is great for an actual poem, but tedious and pretentious for prose. Either way, it's certainly a far cry from that soulless, brainless, action-piece Cruise and Spielberg crapped out a decade ago.
  • (4/5)
    For sci-fi this is a must. I love the language that is used, what is today 'Old English', very eloquent, stylish and intelligent without ever being too clever. H.G Wells certainly new how to tell a story and put humanity at the very limit of its endurance. His characters are very believable, vulnerable and yet heroic in the face of adversity. I particularly enjoyed the flight of the masses through the streets of London.

    Truly brilliant.
  • (5/5)
    I loved War of the Worlds from start to finish! I guess it helped knowing the musical inside out (I love it!) even if there are some differences from the book.

    A strange cylinder lands on Horsell Common and hearing noises coming from it people who have gathered to witness the strange spectacle assume a man is trapped inside, but are driven back by the intense heat. What emerges from the cylinder, however, is something strange, terrifying and completely unwelcome – Martians. Further cylinders arrive and it soon becomes apparent that the Martians are intent on taking over earth – using humans as food. As panic ensues, the protagonist heads towards London – hoping to escape his almost certain fate. The narrator is full of despair as it seems that the earth is doomed, but when it seems that nothing can save the planet something completely unexpected happens that could change the situation for the better…

    What a great book. If you're not a particular fan of classics or sci-fi but are curious to try some then this would be an excellent place to start.
  • (3/5)
    One of the very earliest sci-fi stories, with the Martian invaders. Seems thin now - the famous radio play must have been well scripted to generate the realism to generate the mass panic.Read July 2006
  • (4/5)
    This classic tale of aliens landing on Earth for the purpose of destruction and colonization is an entertaining adventure yarn, which sets the stage for many future apocalyptic/horror stories. The main character records events after they happened and describes the landing of the Martians and their octopus-like bodies and tripod machines of destruction. There is escape, thousands of desperate and fleeing survivors swarming the roads, with scavenging and chaotic behavior. There are the empty ravaged landscapes, full of corpses and empty destroyed buildings and a sense of lonely desolation in the heart of a man who believe he may be the only survivor. In a sense, it's very similar to apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic tales that are told today with the exception of horse-drawn carriages and trains instead of automobiles and cell phones as the backdrop. It's a quick read and very entertaining, and it's easy to see why it became a classic. Now, I'm interested in finding a radio show version to listen to, especially due to all the mass panic stories from when the show was first aired. :)
  • (4/5)
    Martians come to earth and dominate. Humans, though they have adapted, must flee or be eaten.
  • (5/5)
    Wow! I was not expecting this to be as phenomenal as it was. I admit I saw the horrible Tom Cruise movie first and thought the book would be just as bad. I don't mind admitting that I was horribly wrong. This is by far my favorite Wells story so far. It is absolutely amazing. The plot might get a little slow at times, but Wells' dive into the human mind makes it well worth the read.
  • (4/5)
    I teetered on three or four stars and ended up giving it four because of the fabulous Orson Welles radio broadcast that it inspired.

    This book is pretty much exactly what you expect. Definitely a classic and probably defined the field of science fiction.

    Worth the read.