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The Green Mile

The Green Mile

Written by Stephen King

Narrated by Frank Muller


The Green Mile

Written by Stephen King

Narrated by Frank Muller

ratings:
5/5 (343 ratings)
Length:
14 hours
Released:
Dec 1, 1999
ISBN:
9780743563345
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Here this history-making serial novel -- from cliffhanger to cliffhanger -- in its entirety.
When it first appeared, one volume per month, Stephen King's The Green Mile was an unprecedented publishing triumph: all six volumes ended up on the New York Times bestseller list -- simultaneously -- and delighted millions of fans the world over.
Welcome to Cold Mountain Penitentiary, home to the Depression-worn men of E Block. Convicted killers all, each awaits his turn to walk the Green Mile, keeping a date with "Old Sparky," Cold Mountain's electric chair. Prison guard Paul Edgecombe has seen his share of oddities in his years working the Mile. But he's never seen anyone like John Coffey, a man with the body of a giant and the mind of a child, condemned for a crime terrifying in its violence and shocking in its depravity. In this place of ultimate retribution, Edgecombe is about to discover the terrible, wondrous truth about Coffey, a truth that will challenge his most cherished beliefs...and yours.
Released:
Dec 1, 1999
ISBN:
9780743563345
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and an AT&T Audience Network original television series). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

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Reviews

What people think about The Green Mile

4.8
343 ratings / 58 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Have always loved this story. Movie and book. GREAT book.
  • (5/5)
    This absolutely blows the movie out of the water! I finished it in less than 2 days. I couldn’t be peeled away from it. Plus, Frank Muellers narration is PERFECTION.
  • (5/5)
    This is probably the best Stephen King book I’ve ever heard.
  • (5/5)
    Listening to this book made you feel like you was right there
  • (5/5)
    very entertaining I would recommend it to my friends and family
  • (5/5)
    A classic story well worth the time to get into.
  • (5/5)
    So well done love love this well written masterpiece thank you
  • (5/5)
    Some of the best Stephen King writing I've read. The story is a bit slow but becomes so tight nit at the end that I couldn't put the book down.
    Filled with twists and turns and a great thoughtful ending. An emotional ride throughout. Loved it.
  • (5/5)
    This remains my favourite book from Stephen king both in books and movie and the audiobook is a delight for the time in this world and this story.... incredible
  • (5/5)
    This might be my new favorite King book. Outstanding. Actor reading equally outstanding.
  • (5/5)
    Easily the best book (s) you'll ever read. I enjoyed it as much this time as I did when I last read it 20 years ago.
  • (5/5)
    Great book, enjoyable to listen to. Love Stephen King's work
  • (5/5)
    I'm not going to lie. this deserves more than 5 stars.
  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    The story is great of course.
    I was very satisfied with the narration/production. Great story told correctly:)

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    This book was deep, emotional, sad, and perhaps most interestingly, not very 'King-like'. Granted, I'm not a King superfan and have only began to get into his books the past year or two (except for Eyes of the Dragon, which I loved as a teen, but that is also distinctly NOT King-like). But this book didn't feel overly eerie or spooky, not gory, not horrific. None of the things I associate with a King book, but then again, maybe I'm learning that my perceptions about him were wrong.

    This book may tug at your heart, from Mr. Jingles to John Coffey, even to Eduard Delacroix. These were real people who I connected with, and the narrator's voices and inflections contributed tremendously to my experience--he did a fabulous job.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)
    A long time ago, I watched about half of the film, The Green Mile. I think my mum has the DVD, I'll have to get it out when I'm home at Easter, because I've read that the movie was pretty faithful to the book, and I want to see that. I actually read the book, all of it, today, putting it down now and again to eat, wash my hair and do some school work. Very reluctantly, I'll have you know.

    I didn't actually cry at it, but I came pretty close. Ouch. Particularly this part, for me:

    "He kill them with they love," John said. "They love for each other. You see how it was?"
    I nodded, incapable of speech.
    He smiled. The tears were flowing again, but he smiled. "That's how it is every day," he said, "all over the worl'." Then he lay down and turned his face to the wall.


    The Green Mile is really quick to read, but I wouldn't call it easy. The characters are well-written. In fact, Percy, who is one of the most awful characters, is one of the best, because you can imagine him, right down to not wetting the sponge. You've probably known someone a bit like him, a bully, someone who never understands why people think he did something wrong. The other characters were pretty well-written, but Percy was probably the most memorable for me (just like you probably remember the bully from school, but you don't remember the quiet girl who sat in the corner and followed the rules).

    Definitely worth reading. It's not horror, by a long shot, and I don't know why people dismiss Stephen King as "just a horror writer", or "not a writer", when he writes stuff like this.
  • (4/5)
    My first Stephen King novel, unless you count my reading "The Dead Zone" some 25 years ago or more. King certainly keeps things moving, but what surprised me was finding he is a moral writer in the sense that Tolstoy and John Gardner use the word. I am going to read more King stories.
  • (4/5)
    Good, but not great. Has it's share of occasional lulls, but generally absorbing. King once again comes up with an astounding character creation. Was more effective as a serial than a novel.
  • (4/5)
    While this book is very well written, I think on reflection, it is not King's best work. It seems overly sentimental and some of the characters come across as stereotypes. It can make you cry, though.
  • (4/5)
    This book was originally published in six parts. As a result, it's a bit more repetitive than other King books, but it is still a very good book. There are many similarities to the movie, but some differences as well. If you've seen the movie first (as I have), it's not disturbing however; reading the book adds to your comprehension of the story.
  • (5/5)
    This is my favorite King book (except for maybe Carrie). A view of what it's like for officers who have the job of working on death row but of course with the addition of some really unbelievable phenomena going on! I hate injustice and it really blew me away that John Coffey wasn't cleared of the murders.
  • (5/5)
     Have you ever read a book and been so affected by it that it had you in tears? The Green Mile by Stephen King is amazing!. I sat there tearing every few pages or so. It's incredible - the emotion, the feelings... Just the sadness that's presented. It's a prison story, but moves beyond that, touching on human sensibilities, on human emotions. What I can talk about, however, is the emotions that the books caused to arise in me.Do you believe that people can be evil? Hmm, let me be more specific. Do you believe that a person can be bad, or evil, without having any good in them? After reading this book, I would say yes, there are people who don't have any good in them. I know, I know - the book is fiction, but that doesn't mean that it can't describe what can actually exist in real life. One of the characters in the book was completely... I don't know if I can use the word evil in this context, but I guess bad, vicious, wicked, cruel would seem like the appropriate description. Even when people gave him a break, after seeing the cruelty, it made no difference, he continued the same backbiting, sadistic ways of the past. And it didn't matter how many times he was "forgiven" or let off, it was the same. One particular part that hit me hard was this."Then I understood why he had panicked, why he'd fought us so hard. He thought we were going to put him in with Wild Bill Wharton; that his punishment for the dry sponge was to be a dry cornholing from the resident psychopath. Instead of feeling sympathy for Percy at this realization, I felt disgusted and a hardening of my resolve. He was, after all, judging us by the way he would have behaved, had our positions been reversed.". A person like this can't help but think others will do the same to him as he would to others. I guess that holds true to a certain degree for everyone too. But any how, great book. I read it in 1 week - I couldn't put it down. You really should check it out!...
  • (5/5)
    still an all time favorite
  • (5/5)
    I remember spotting the first book of this series, titled "The Two Dead Girls" at the grocery store one night in the spring of 1996 while shopping. I have been reading SK since the 70's, so naturally I snapped this up. Every week I'd scour the book rack on each visit to the store, looking for the next part in the series. What a joy it was to anticipate each part of the story.I enjoyed reading this in this manner. It made me savor each twist and turn. I wasn't in a hurry to read to the end...as the end hadn't appeared on the book rack yet!
  • (2/5)
    I read this when I was a teenager, and I don't remember enjoying it very much. It's probably one of those that needs a re-read, since I'm seeing glowing reviews everywhere.
  • (5/5)
    Ruby's review of The Green Mile by Stephen KingLike everyone, I've seen the film of The Green Mile. Unlike everyone, I've not heard the film as I was in denial about my hearing loss for the past two decades. All the films I've watched have been looked at and not heard, so my attention wandered. I remember the mouse resurrection and that's about it. My recollections of other King stories in film are similar - Carrie and the burning sports hall, The Shining and Jack with the axe. There was an inertia I needed to overcome in even buying a Stephen King novel. I hate to walk with the crowd, Contrary Mary that I am. Eventually I picked up The Green Mile to complete a 3 for €10 offer in a shop in Dingle, Kerry. The title didn't even register with me at the time.Then I opened the book, began to read, recognised the premise of large, unnatural John Coffey on death row and was hooked.King uses Paul Edgecombe as first person narrator to great effect. The full horror of the death penalty is the overriding theme throughout. This is Death Row and execution is by electric chair so there are necessarily graphic scenes but they're gratifying without being gratuitous.Most of the book takes place within E Block at the Cold Mountain State Penitentiary. It's claustrophobic. The sweat and tears of prisoners and guards alike flows before the reader's face and sometimes on the reader's face. Each character comes to life, and some to death, in full 3D technicolor and the story is all about their interaction. The plot is bare bones, the reader wishing that the characters would catch up with what the reader has already divined, praying for the salvation that comes for some and not for others.Coffey's character is truly supernatural and would bring anyone close to Believing. I was simultaneously relieved and disappointed that Coffey let the gang off the hook in the end.The wrap up in the retirement home was very moving - to find love again at the end of the road, an absolution for wrongdoing and acknowledgement of human frailty in the face of death.Once or twice I was perplexed by the repetition at the start of new chapters but the author's afterword explains that the story was originally issued in instalments, so that's why recaps were built in.This is the kind of book that I could read again immediately, but my wife has already swiped it out of my hand!
  • (4/5)
    Stephen King should stick to writing these sorts of books. Don't get me wrong, I love most of his horror stuff, but it's this sort of subtle supernatural genre that I think really shows his talents as a writer and story-teller since the horror element isn't overshadowing everything else within the novel.The Green Mile is a little long, being comprised of 6 novellas and it is definitely slow-paced. That doesn't mean it isn't exciting, though! The slowness of the story really allowed me to delve into the characters and the story King has created. I felt like I got to know all the characters, especially Paul, whose first-person narrative it is. This made the action parts even better, since I had a connection with the characters and cared about them.I liked how the narrative jumped from Paul as an old man living in a nursing home to Paul as a middle-aged man meeting John Coffey. I think it added a lot to the intrigue, as there were multiple mysteries you were trying to solve at once. The Green Mile has a great message and is a compelling story that will leave you in tears by the end.I saw the movie before reading the book and honestly, if you've seen the movie, the novel won't add all that much for you. The movie is very true to the book and captures the most important events. Naturally, the book has other elements that added to my appreciation of the story. The parallelism between the prison and Paul's nursing home, for example, and a deeper understanding of the characters.There were some things I didn't like -- like I said, the pace sometimes seemed too slow at times. But then again, King's books always seem to drag just a little bit for me. I also didn't like how at times the characters all laughed at something as if it were hilarious, and I didn't think it was funny at all. Besides that, though, it was a good story and I enjoyed the read. I definitely recommend this.
  • (4/5)
    King's classic writing style. Enjoyed it. May have had a side character that I found annoying, but he was essential to the story.
  • (4/5)
    Due to the episodic nature of The Green Mile, there is a degree of redundancy in the narrative. Once that is put aside, King's tale of a death row convict who may be more than he seems is gripping and emotionally charged. The blurb claims it's a thriller, however not much happens to offer thrills and spills, the steady build up to the finale is certainly drama, possibly even melodrama. The real win for King with The Green Mile is the character development and the emotional ties he creates; the finale is empowered with an affecting charge and will resonate for some time after the final page has been turned.
  • (1/5)
    Even though I loved the film very very much I didn't manage to finish the book. After some chapters I gave up, it didn't take hold of me as strong as the film did. Pity great story though. (Maybe because I read it in French)