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Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

Written by T. Harv Eker

Narrated by T. Harv Eker


Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

Written by T. Harv Eker

Narrated by T. Harv Eker

ratings:
4.5/5 (642 ratings)
Length:
3 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 15, 2005
ISBN:
9780060838935
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

BookSnapshot

Also available as...

BookSnapshot

Description

In his groundbreaking Secrets of the Millionaire Mind, T. Harv Eker states: "Give me five minutes, and I can predict your financial future for the rest of your life!" Eker does this by identifying your "money and success blueprint." This blueprint determines your financial life. If your money blueprint is not set for a high level of success, you will never have a lot of money -- and if somehow you do, you will most likely lose it! The good news is that now you can actually reset your money blueprint to create natural and automatic success.

In Secrets of the Millionaire Mind, you will learn how your childhood influences have shaped your financial destiny. You will also learn how to identify your own money blueprint and "revise" it to not only create success but, more importantly, to keep and continually grow it. Finally, you will be introduced to the "Wealth Files:" 17 specific ways rich people think and act. These include specific action steps for you to practice in order to increase your income and accumulate wealth. It's simple, if you think like rich people think and do what rich people do, chances are you'll get rich too!

Publisher:
Released:
Feb 15, 2005
ISBN:
9780060838935
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

BookSnapshot

About the author

Using the principles he teaches, T. Harv Eker went from zero to millionaire in only two and a half years, and went on to build one of the largest success training companies in North America. With his unique brand of "street smarts with heart," Eker's humorous, "cut-to-the-chase" style keeps his audience spellbound. People come from all over the world to attend his sold-out seminars, where crowds often exceed 2,000 people for a weekend program. So far, Eker's teachings have touched the lives of over a million people. Now, for the first time, he shares his proven secrets of success in this revolutionary book. Read it and grow rich!


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What people think about Secrets of the Millionaire Mind

4.7
642 ratings / 231 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    add a few ♥ ♥ ♥ as well for good measureLet's be honest (as you know I will be): I had this book when it came out, but because of all the reviews I read in one of my Shelfari Groups which were going on & on about the "literary" quality; blah, blah, blah, blah, blah; I put the book back into the book sale. I didn't read, not one review that actually told me what the book was really about, had I, I would have read it much sooner.Hence Four (4) years later, I found it again in the book sale & I have finished it in two days and I LOVE IT & Will Keep This in my Personal Library.A female Golem is made for a man as his wife. En route to New York he awakens her, but then he dies and she is free. A kindly Rabbi finds her, takes her in and names her Chava... She gets a job in a bakery; the Rabbi dies & she continues her life...In the desert of the Middle East a Djinn is entrapped in a copper flask by an evil wizard. The flask passes down from one generation to another until it reaches a tinsmith, who while repairing it releases the Djinn. The Djinn becomes Ahmed & works with the tinsmith (who is a jerk, but hey) increasing the tinsmith's business & his bank accountThe Djinn & Golem meet and become "friends"... they have their nocturnal adventures through New York and are working through their relationship when the maker of the Golem arrives in New York & attempts to take control of her.This is "Golem:Jinni For Dummies" The book was rich with legend, history and romantic, Bedouin, Jewish, Syrian, Ghetto (not like slums but melting-pot neighborhood), & privileged life.The pace was actually fast, the relationships well thought out, the writing redolent of heady "Arabian" & fantastical nights, survival, the nature of the mystical, & the etheric qualitative beauty of mystical love.I'm ready to read it again..... Now I understand there is a sequel, but I am not ready for that, as I usually find sequels disappointing.....
  • (5/5)
    So if you're the kind of person who doesn't really get into fantasy, but likes a touch of magic in your stories, this is the book for you. From the title you can guess that the two main characters are a Golem and a Jinni, but the story takes place mostly in New York in 1899. It's so original, but also accessible it really seems like it's destined to be a classic and I would love to see a movie made from it. It has romance, tragedy, and the setting is perfect. I really cared about the characters and wanted them to succeed. It probably helped that the narrator was George Guidell, he's not my favorite narrator, but when I hear his voice it reminds me of many audiobooks I listened to 20+ years ago.
  • (5/5)
    This took me a lot longer to read than I would've liked, partly due to the smallish text (maybe I should've read it on my Kindle), but toward the end, partly because I didn't want to say goodbye to these characters. I read a sequel is coming in the fall, but this book has a perfect ending and while I welcome the chance to read more about Chava the Golem and Ahmad the Jinni, I would have been happy enough with just this.Chava is a Hebrew creature made of clay to be the wife of a man who dies en route from Prussia to New York City in 1899. An elderly rabbi realizes her true nature and takes her under his wing, trying to teach her how to fit in. Ahmad (his real name is unpronounceable) is a jinni released from a flask by a Syrian metalsmith after years of captivity. Still trapped by the iron cuff on his wrist, put there by the wizard who had imprisoned him, the newly-named Ahmad is stuck in human form. Wecker makes full use of their opposing natures as the two non-human creatures happen upon each other one night and form an odd friendship. Chava has been left masterless yet privy to the thoughts of all humans she comes in contact with. Needing neither sleep nor food or drink, possessing no beating heart, she is under constant stress of being found out. A being of superior strength, she poses a danger to society and she can be destroyed by the reading of a particular spell. Freed from a master's control though by nature she was made for such control, Chava struggles to find her place in the city she finds herself in.On the other hand, Ahmad is a creature born to soar and the constraints of human form and the need to also fit into society, are as chafing to his nature as the cuff on his wrist.Dangers come from all directions, including the arrival of the elderly mystic who created Chava who is seeking eternal life, the bewitched man who senses Ahmad's true nature, and instances where both Chava and Ahmad inadvertently reveal their special abilities. Wecker does a wonderful job weaving together the disparate characters and events, including flashbacks, to give us a fully realized, fantastical New York City at the end of the 1800s. Along the way, she gives us a treatise on what it means to be human, as well as an unexpected love story.
  • (4/5)
    It's really not fair to compare this book to The Night Circus, as we are only ever as we are made, no more, no less.
  • (4/5)
    Loved it. Interesting, historical, easy to read, fantasy, religion, this has it all! More please!
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful book.
  • (5/5)
    A Jewish female golem, a creature of clay, was created to be her master's wife, who was immigrating to 1899 America. When he dies during the voyage, the golem is overwhelmed by the surrounding thoughts that flood her consciousness. During the same time, a jinni, a citizen of the desert and creature of fire, is released from a metal flask in Little Syria, NYC, only to discoverer that he has no memory of how he got into the container and a unremovable metal bracelet preventing him to assume no shape but a human. Both supernatural creatures are befriended by older lonely men, a rabbi and a tinsmith, who take pity on the creatures and help them in their assimilation in the surrounding communities. Then one night, the two of them meet, each creature seeing the other for what they really are.

    Although this author's debut novel possesses fantastical elements, this is not the primary focus of this historical novel. It is actually about two outsiders attempting to discover what it means to be human and to create a new world for themselves. A story that holds you from cover to cover, it is one of my new favorites. I look forward to reading other novels by this author.
  • (4/5)
    Although it was a little slow to start and I have to admit I got a tad bored at times, this book was just fantastic! I absolutely loved the folklore, the characters (the Golem and the Jinni were so badass, I loved them both for totally different reasons), the settings, the different cultures, the writing, it was all impeccably done. And add onto that the multiple perspectives and storylines that were woven together and DING DING DING, we have a winner!

    This would've definitely been a 5 star book were it not for the slow start in those first 150 pages or so. I don't really mind slow paced books that much but the beginning of this one made me a bit antsy, particularly due to the lack of plot. Sure, things were happening, but they weren't all that exciting. (In hindsight, all of the exposition was really important in setting up the story but I still feel like it could've been executed better). Regardless, I'm very happy I pushed myself because it was so worth it.

    I would definitely recommend The Golem and the Jinni but please, go into with one thing in mind: be patient. It might seem boring and overdrawn at first but trust me, when it all comes together in the end your mind will be blown (ALL THE PLOT TWISTS I TELL YOU!).
  • (1/5)
    Tiptree shortlist 2013. Got almost a quarter of the way through and nothing remotely interesting had happened - neither was there anything that might be interpreted as an examination of gender. I gave up.
  • (5/5)
    A magical novel. A female golem is awakened on her passage to American only to have her master die en route. She meets a rabbi who is trying to teach her to person. A bound genie has been freed accidentally and takes an apprenticeship with a tinsmith until he can figure out how to break his binding. The golem and the genie meet and become tentative friends.
  • (5/5)
    What a wonderful story! Good vs. evil. Historical. Cultural. I rooted for all of the characters, except the old man who created the golem.
  • (4/5)
    The Golem and the Jinni tells the long, rather drawn out story of the unusual relationship between two otherworldly beings. Chava is a female golem, a figure from Jewish folklore. Made of clay, she is supernaturally strong, but created to be submissive to a master's will. Her companion is Ahmad, a jinni imported from the Arab storytelling tradition. Freed from his centuries-long imprisonment in a flask, Ahmad is made from fire, and, as befits his nature, he's impetuous and passionate. Through various twists of fate, both of these fabled creatures find themselves living among humans in turn-of-the-century New York City. Their interactions with people ultimately beget violence and sorrow. I found this novel intriguing, but also dark and almost cheerless, lightened only by the golem's and the jinni's touching devotion to each other. I would have liked it better had there been less of it.
  • (4/5)
    Great read.
  • (3/5)
    Golems! Jinni! Rabbi wizards!
  • (5/5)
    Seriously impressed with this book! I think the ending could've been better, but the storytelling here was captivating.
  • (5/5)
    LOVED IT!! LOVED IT!! LOVED IT!!
  • (5/5)
    What a wonderful book! It is extremely well written, and it seems that it was researched thoroughly. The story takes place in 1899 New York in two distinct neighborhoods: Syrian and Jewish. I was not that familiar with the mythology of the jinni before reading this, and I had never heard of a golem before. Wecker does a great job of giving these characters interesting backstories and believable personalities. I especially loved Chava and could relate to her in a lot of ways.It takes quite a few pages for the jinni and the golem to finally meet one another, but it doesn't feel like a long time because Wecker's descriptions of the scenery and the time and other character's backstories are so interesting.I especially love how Wecker compared the differing personalities of the golem and the jinni and exposed how they are similar in very human ways. While doing this, she brings up some intriguing insights into human psychology, religion, and philosophy without being heavy handed.The author is great at intertwining all of the characters stories together into one amazing story- everyone from the main characters to the little boy down the road to the ice cream vendor to the director of a Jewish boarding house.I read this for book club and I probably wouldn't have chosen it on my own, but I am so glad that I read it! I would strongly recommend this to anyone interested in mythological fiction, historical fiction, or literary fiction.
  • (5/5)
    By far this is the best novel I have read since J.R.R. Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy back 1983! Deeply satisfying and perfectly paced, Helene Wecker's novel is sure to cause a sleepless night or two because you won't want to put it down.

    The story takes place in NYC at the end of the 19th century. Two otherworldly/mythological beings of completely different genii and inherent characteristics unexpectedly find themselves in a foreign land trying to make sense of a culture and race they must learn and imitate to survive. For all intents and purposes they appear to be human, but their "kind" have coexisted with the human race for centuries in their true forms known only to a few. Their arrival in New York happened separately, unbeknownst to each other until one serendipitous evening they meet.

    "The Golem and the Jinni" is an allegorically-woven tale written with unpretentious honesty. Helene Wecker beautifully illustrates both the virtuous and the dark sides of human nature. It's underlying theme brings a fresh awareness that each of us makes choices that define and mold our character; however, only we know what our strengths and struggles are and how easy or difficult it is to portray ourselves positively to the outside world. And for many of us the world's perception is at odds with with our deeper desire of who we aspire to be but have fallen short. One possible explanation could be that we harbor a handicap(s) acquired through nature, nurture or both. And if so, do we have the power to overcome those forces that so effortlessly seem to prevent us from reaching this personal goal? Anyone who has ever felt like a stranger or a minority whether racial or cultural or has been limited by a physical/mental handicap will connect with the characters in "The Golem & the Jinni". Not since J.D. Salingers "The Catcher in the Rye" has a novel captured in intimate detail the inner demons we all battle against or ultimately surrender to.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. I was engrossed from page one and I loved the premise. I felt that all the characters were very deep and complex. I even enjoyed the villain, perhaps because of the long history Wecker gave him. I loved the interactions between the golem and the jinni and how differently they viewed humans. As their relationship developed over time they began to change each other's views on humanity and life. I enjoyed how the jinni's past slowly unfolded throughout the story and built up to the main conflict. And of course the cover is beautiful and I love the rough edges of the pages. I think everyone should give this book a chance.
  • (4/5)
    Rating: 4 of 5The Golem and the Jinni did not sweep me off my feet immediately. It took 120-130 pages before I was completely engrossed. After that, well, it was a good thing I didn't own a golem: lest anyone or anything that interrupt my reading suffer its wrath. Seriously, though, this was one of those books where I read right up till the last possible minute - to take dinner off the stove, to sign into work, to leave the house for whatever errand, or even to go to the bathroom.I loved the blending of Jewish and Arab folklore, both of which I knew only a little.I loved that it could be read as a love story, but it did so without all the melodramatic romance, lovey dovey crap that annoys me about most "love stories."I loved the exploration of what it means to be human.And I loved the ending, which was equal parts bitter and sweet.It was fiction at its best, doing exactly what I think great fiction is meant to do, which can be taken at face value and enjoyed purely as fantastic storytelling, but can also go deeper ... much deeper if the reader were so inclined and wished to engage in its philosophical questions.
  • (4/5)
    I heard a great deal of acclaim regarding this book last year, but more than that, it sounded relevant to my interests. I love historical fiction--even more if it has fantastic elements--and I am intrigued by golems. I was happy when this ebook went on sale a few weeks ago, and even happier when it made the Nebula shortlist--that meant this was a top priority for me to read by the end of March. Yay.It reads like historical fiction--the voice is very straightforward, the view point varying between several characters. Sometimes I felt like the viewpoints gave away almost too much. Wecker does a fabulous job of creating sympathetic characters. The golem is made to be a man's wife--made to be a willing slave, designed to please in all things--though things fall apart (for the better, in her case) and she is free in New York City. The jinni is likewise bound, but he has no idea who his master was. He is released in New York City after centuries of confinement, with no memory of how he was confined. He is a bit of a cad--normally a turn-off for me--but he is not a bad fellow, truly. As a powerful entity, he's ignorant of the consequences he has on more fragile humans (in contrast to the golem, who feels the profound urge to please in all things).I could see some people being irritated by their characters as really exploiting male and female stereotypes, but I didn't feel that way. To me, they each made sense and felt very real.Wecker's research is astonishing. New York City at the turn of the 20th century is a compelling and grim place of immigrants and squalor. This is one of those books that is both entertaining and enlightening in regards to history; I also loved the additional historical notes at the back, things she couldn't fit into the book, like how Jewish bakers often sold their bakeries for the week of Passover, and how most Syrian immigrants at that point were Christian.It's a solid book. Not perfect, but enjoyable. I've read only two of the eight books on the Nebula shortlist, and so far this is my favorite.
  • (5/5)
    Joy's review: I just LOVED this book! The Golem and the Jinni are both new to this world and trying to pass as human. It's a tale of good and evil, of what it means to be human, of finding yourself where you don't belong. I found myself caring about the characters to the point of being anxious for the Golem's safety. Helene Wecker is great storyteller. Set in 1890's New York's Jewish and Syrian communities, this book also provides a vivid portrait of immigrant life in one of the world's great immigrant cities.
  • (4/5)
    I'm not much of a fantasy fan and am not sure why I picked up The Golem and the Jinni, but I'm glad I did. The characters are richly drawn, as are the settings, both turn-of-the century New York and the desert flashbacks. The Golem & the Jinni was a very enjoyable read.
  • (5/5)
    Chava is a golem, created from clay by a magician she does not remember. Her master awakens her on the voyage to America, but he dies before the ship reaches Ellis Island. Chava was created to obey her master's will, but without that will to guide her, she is susceptible to the fears and desires she can hear from every person she comes into contact with. She is also capable of unthinkable destruction unless she can learn to control her own impulses.Ahmad is a jinni, a creature of fire. When Arbeely, a tinsmith, tries to repair the flask that has held Ahmad captive for centuries, Ahmad finds himself trapped in a time and place that he has never imagined. Though the sorcerer who enslaved him is long dead, Ahmad still cannot remove the iron cuff that holds him in his human form. Like Chava, he finds himself in a strange place, struggling to pass as human.Little do these two nonhuman creatures know that their destinies are inexplicably intertwined.I really enjoyed this story, and the way that all of the characters and subplots were interconnected. The writing is lovely, the concept is unique, and secondary characters as well as the two main characters are dynamic and fully realized. If you enjoy fantasy, or historical fiction set at the beginning of the twentieth century, I highly recommend this book.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! It made me truly happy and I recommend it highly. With that said, let me begin.The Golem is a fascinating creature! I remember watching my father in his studies with the Rabbi (after my own painfully boring lesson), listening to them banter back and forth, citing miniscule details and wordings to argue a piece of Talmudic law. I would eavesdrop, transfixed, hanging on their discussions of minutia. And then, one day, I discovered a book of folktales that referenced the Golem, and their discussions became even more interesting. When would they get to the Golem? When would they build one in the Rabbi's study? Of course, I look back on this and laugh - not because I find Jewish Mysticism any less fantastic, but because I came to understand that I would never get my pet Golem, and that I would not have wanted one anyway.The loyalty, and frankly, the capacity for violence associated with the Golem lends an undercurrent of terror to this tale. To call it a supernatural love story is really the basest of truths. It is a romance of the city of New York, as it was seen by immigrants and citizens of the 1890s. It is a search for one's path, one's place in the world, as well as in the day to day, and what makes a fulfilling and meaningful existence. Welker's research was wonderful done (at least the Jewish portions that I can claim knowledge of), and the blending of Eastern European and Syrian folklore yielded such a beautiful story that I didn't want it to end. It is remarkable that _The Golem and the Jinni_ is Welker's first novel. I anxiously await her next endeavor.
  • (3/5)
    A bit melodramatic, but a good vacation read.
  • (4/5)
    For me this book was pure entertainment fantasy - an unusual plot with pretty good writing. It was a little long and for me dragged a bit in the middle. If it wasn't for that I would give it five star rating. If you don't demand scientific realism with your narrative (never once did the author offer a rational explanation of how a golem and jenni would be living in early 20th century Manhattan) then one may like this unusual story.
  • (4/5)
    This fantasy should appeal to people who don't like fantasy. The unlikely story is a good read.
  • (5/5)
    I had heard a lot of great things about Helene Wecker's debut novel, The Golem and The Jinni, but not being a big fan of fantasy, I didn't read it...until now. I tore through this 484-page novel, and loved being dropped into the Arabian desert of hundreds of years ago and turn of the 20th century New York City following the adventures of trapped jinni and lost golem.We all know what a jinni is (1001 Nights and TV's I Dream of Jeannie), but this jinni follows the folklore more than the fantasy of something that can grant three wishes. This jinni is freed from the copper flask where he has been trapped for hundreds of years and ends up working as a tinsmith in a shop in the Little Syria section of New York City in the early 1900s.The Golem in the story reminded me of Frankenstein. She was created out of clay (and other things) to be a wife for a man who dies on a boat from Europe to New York City. The Golem ends up in New York City, all alone and unsure of what to do. A rabbi finds her, recognizes her for what she is and takes her in.Along the way we find out how the jinni came to be trapped and who is stalking him. The evil person who created the golem comes looking for her when he discovers her master has died. A doctor who performed an exorcism that left him blind ends up in New York working in Little Syria as an impoverished ice cream vendor, and ends up involved with the jinni.The jinni, called Ahmad, and the golem, named Chava by the Rabbi, live their lives, but are truly strangers in a strange land. Ahmad works as a tinsmith by day and wanders the city by night. Chava works in a bakery and at night takes in work as a seamstress as she requires no sleep.Ahmad and Chava eventually meet and wander the city at night together. I was entranced by their journeys through a New York City I recognized- from the Bowery to Madison Square Park to the mansions of Fifth Avenue and Central Park, which plays such an important role in this book.Golems are able to hear the secret desires of their master and are made to protect their masters with superhuman strength. When Chava's master died, she could hear the thoughts and desires of everyone around her and it was too much for her to take. And when she or someone she cared about became threatened, she could not control her impulse to physically lash out, leading to bad situations.The writing is exquisite, and Wecker knows how to turn a phrase. She says of a cemetery headstone that has the name and dates engraved on only one side, "The other was still blank, as though it hadn't yet heard the awful news."As someone who rides the NYC subways, I appreciated this: "The more he rode the trolleys and trains of New York, the more they seemed to form a giant, malevolent bellows, inhaling defenseless passengers from platforms and street corners and blowing them out again elsewhere."This is a rip-roaring, page-turning story that dares the reader to put it down. I stayed up til the wee hours of the morning finishing this book, barely breathing until this brilliant, totally engrossing novel was finished. Bravo, Ms. Wecker, I can't wait for your next creation.
  • (4/5)
    This was a wonderful book - satisfying and stimulating on so many levels. It falls into the unusual combination of literary fiction, historic fiction, and romantic fantasy. Romantic fantasy is a pretty popular genre these days, but not many of the books are as thoughtful or as well written as this one. The characters in this story are Chava, a golem and Ahmad a jinni, both immigrants to the US in the early 20th century. Both of these characters are outsiders - magical creatures in a world of humans and immigrants in a world of Americans. The story flows beautifully and could be enjoyed just for the plot, but add in the complexities of prejudice, friendship and the immigrant experience and you have a great story.