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White Fang

White Fang

Written by Jack London

Narrated by Iman


White Fang

Written by Jack London

Narrated by Iman

ratings:
3.5/5 (14 ratings)
Length:
33 minutes
Released:
Jul 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780848113001
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

This audio classic novel has been carefully abridged and adapted into 10 short easy to understand chapters. This format enables listeners of all ages and English language abilities to understand and enjoy the story. Composition includes original custom back ground music.
Released:
Jul 1, 2011
ISBN:
9780848113001
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Jack London nació en San Francisco en 1876, hijo ilegítimo de un astrólogo ambulante que pronto los abandonaría a él y a su madre, una joven «huida» de una acomodada familia de Ohio. Poco después de dar a luz, la madre se casó con John London, carpintero y vigilante jurado entre otros oficios, de quien el hijo tomaría el apellido. Jack dejó el colegio a los trece años, y desde entonces hasta los veintisiete, edad en la que se consagraría como escritor, su juventud fue inquieta y agitada: sus biógrafos y él mismo convertirían en leyenda sus múltiples trabajos y vagabundeos, de ladrón de ostras a buscador de oro en Alaska, así como su visionaria vocación política, formalizada con su ingreso en 1896 en el Partido Socialista de los Trabajadores. En 1903 publicó un reportaje sobre el proletariado del East End londinense, <i>Gente del abismo</i>, y <i>La llamada de la selva</i>, que le lanzó a la fama. Su experiencia marinera fue la base de <i>El lobo de mar</i> (1904), otro gran éxito, y a partir de entonces publicó asiduamente narrativa y ensayos, pronunció conferencias por todo el mundo y emprendió nuevos viajes. De uno de ellos nació un ciclo sobre los Mares del Sur, al que pertenecen los cuentos de <i>La casa del orgullo</i> (1909; ALBA CLÁSICA núm. ). Son de especial interés sus textos autobiográficos, la novela <i<Martin Eden</i> (1909) y las «memorias alcohólicas» de <i>John Barleycorn</i> (1913). London murió de una sobredosis de morfina y atropina en su rancho californiano, en 1916.


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Reviews

What people think about White Fang

3.7
14 ratings / 45 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    I've lost track of how many times I read this as a kid. Wonderful book!
  • (5/5)
    Amazing book with a great story that kept me on my toes. Although you need to have kind of a long attention span it's a great story once you get into it.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent!!!
  • (5/5)
    A true classic.
  • (2/5)
    Enjoyed the first three chapters, even if they were a bit gruesome. Cast Liam Neeson and you'd have the makings of a fine movie there. Lost interest when the narration switched to the wolves' point of view. Also, the narrator's voice was grating and seemed to emphasize the wrong things. Unfinished.
  • (4/5)
    White Fang is a wolf dog who lies in Alaska. He was born in a cave with 4 other pups and he was the only one who survive. He was taken to an Indian Camp with his mom. He was given the name White Fang. He was very cunning and fierce. He was hated by all the other dogs in the camp. Soon his mom was taken from him and he was bullied and also scared. He learned how to protect himself from the other puppies and how to live with humans. He was sold to a man name Beauty Smith who treated him badly and put him to fight and kill other dogs for money. He was saved by Scott after he almost died when dog fighting. Scott took him to his home in California where he was love and became a part of Scott family and also had puppies of his own. I enjoyed reading this adventurous book which shows us about animal feelings and trust. It shows how some people can be cruel to animals and some can be kind as well. White Fang went from a fierce animal who met cruelty, being bullied and abused to enjoying life and having his own puppies. I think it was very horrible the way he was beaten and put into fights. No one deserve this type of treatment.
  • (4/5)
    An emotive book depicting the imaginary life of a wolf. Through his feelings and opinions, Jack London presents us a comprehensive critic of inner and outer nature of humans by means of implicit comparisons between animals and humans.
  • (4/5)
    Having only a cursory knowledge of London's work, I decided to choose White Fang first when considering which public domain works to record as audio books. I've only "read" it once, but have listened to it probably a half-dozen more times in the editing process. It's very well written, accessible, and very involved. At no time did I feel as if London was writing without a clear purpose and passion. Excellent read and rather timeless. As a side note, there are some very decent young adult versions with illustrations and even one with a sidebar defining more complex words. Very useful for young readers.
  • (5/5)
    White Fang is a very good book which I recommend to 4th grade and higher readers. I think anybody would love to read this action-packed book!!!!!!!!
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. It chronicles the life of a wolf(half dog) through the harse wilderness, brutal treatment at the hand of man, and then ultimately friendship and love. The book is written from the aspect of the wolf. Truly a great book. Highly recommend for dog lovers!
  • (5/5)
    This is the story of White Fang - 3/4 wolf and 1/4 dog. It tells of White Fangs parentage, his birth, his early days in the wild, his meeting with men and learning to live with them, of his meeting with white men and learning to live with them. Along the way, he learns some terribly hard lessons, and also learns some great joys as well.
  • (4/5)
    I bought this book at a book fair at school when I was nine. I cannot tell how many times I have read it. As a child, I mainly read it for the 'wolf' story, but as an adult, I have appreciated the deeper aspects of the writing. London was big on analyzing why people do what they do, not always correct imo. It's still a good read, forget the movie(s).
  • (3/5)
    Jack London imports Social Darwinist credo, used more clumsily and less divertingly by authors such as Frank Norris, into letters with fervor, conviction, and skill. We encounter White Fang, a part domestic dog and mostly wolf dog that lives with a pack in the wilderness and whose mother had once been domesticated by the Native Americans. As in the case of its companion volume, "Call of the Wild," (where the dog Buck moves from domesticity to the wild, as opposed to vice versa), White Fang has abusive owners who want White Fang to fight for money, but White Fang is rescued by a man who is called, under the regime of London's casually assumed racism, one of the "white human gods." A great tale, and a book that serves as an excellent introduction to literature for young adolescents, bit can be relished at all ages.
  • (4/5)
    A strange, strange book. But powerful.
  • (4/5)
    I read this book in Danish when I was about 10, and it made a strong lasting impression. For that reason I'll give it at least 4 stars, although don't know how I would had rated it if I had read it as an adult.
  • (1/5)
    I don't think I've ever read such an offensive, disturbing book in my life. I've never encountered a book with so much violence, nor have I ever read a book that so clearly advocated for violence on every front. I have no idea why this book is geared towards children??? I would NEVER give my child this book.On top of that, I don't think enough people pay attention to what a flagrant racist London was. For example, "Those white gods [white men] were strong. They possessed greater mastery over matter than the gods [Native Americans White Fang] had known, most powerful among which was Grey Beaver [a Native American]. And yet Grey Beaver was a child-god among these white-skinned ones" (162).Beyond this, London is unendingly pessimistic and depressing. He has a horrendously ugly worldview in which the world is "a chaos of gluttony and slaughter, ruled over by chance, merciless, planless, endless" (90). And he is incredibly disrespectful towards religion -- I'm not a particularly religious person, but even I was offended.However, after reading this book, I would have to say I am thankful for a few things. First, I am thankful I never have to read this book again or be curious about it or get snookered into reading another London text. Second, I am thankful tenfold for the fact that I will never know Jack London. I have never disliked an author more and I will never read another London book as long as I live. Half a star is too good for this book.
  • (2/5)
    Not as good as Call of the Wild, but still one of Jack London's best books.
  • (5/5)
    Avoided reading this for many years despite it being recommended by many. Guess the name suggested gory violence, and there is very little of that. The tale of this dog/wolf mix from puppy to adult is a loving, curious, sorrowful, and joyful adventure. The human/dog relationships depicted are realistic. A captivating read.
  • (3/5)
    I liked it alright as a dog lover but was a little bored finding descriptions repetitious. Call of the Wild was much better in my opinion.
  • (4/5)
    Beautiful writing about the life of a dog/wolf in the Yukon. Life in the wild changes as White Fang is first "owned" by an Indian, later by a terrible man named Beauty Smith who makes him into a fighting dog, and last by a kind man who becomes very attached to the dog.
  • (5/5)
    This story follows the life of White Fang who is part dog and part wolf from puppyhood to maturity. The descriptive writing by the author is poetic and extensive to illustrate the interactive dynamics in White Fang's life. The reader is drawn into White Fang's impressions and thoughts as he moves through the brutality and cruelty of his fellow canines and owners until he is rescued by Wendon Scott. The emotional learning from hatred to love is complex but the author is able to evolve these emotions with great expertise. The author's use of vocabulary is effective and picturesque. A wonderful read.!
  • (4/5)
    I drive a lot for work and get bored with listening to the radio after a while. A lot of times I'll listen to audiobooks but they're so expensive that I haven't listened to one in a while. So I was happily surprised when I found White Fang and The Call of the Wild on audio for $4 apiece at Half Price Books. If you are not familiar with this store, I am very sorry. It's absolutely wonderful (but not near as wonderful as our own Recycled Books here in Denton - I really love that store).So I remember reading The Call of the Wild when I was kid and I think I saw a movie on White Fang at some point in my life but they're both very fuzzy and needless to say I had the two confused in my head. Well, maybe not confused but merged is the better word. I had somehow remembered a wild half-wolf dog that was captured and tortured to fight other dogs then rescued and taught be a sled dog who eventually went back to the wild. Yeah. Just remember it had been a long time.After listening to the two back to back, I believe that The Call of the Wild is my favorite of the two simply because I'm not fond of the narrative in White Fang. The narrator keeps referring to people as "gods" in White Fangs eyes. Also, he sees power as coming from material possessions. This is a human qualification and I have never seen animals give deference to another animal because of possessions. They base power on strength. It is possible with some animals that the leader may have access to more food and other possessions but that is because he/she is ALREADY leader. Those things do not make the leader. So, because the wolf apparently sees materials possessions as power he sees white people as being superior to all others. See where I'm going here? Very irritating.Ok, here's another problem: inconsistency. I realize these are different stories but they both concern sled dogs at some point. In The Call of the Wild, the sled dogs regard the lead sled dog with deference and treat him as leader in all other aspects of life. In White Fang, the other dogs view the lead dog as running away from them and therefore a coward to be tormented. The lead dog must sit with the people in order to be protected. WHAT??!! I don't know anything about sledding but I know about dogs and this simply doesn't make sense. The Call of the Wild was written first so maybe he discovered something that I don't know about. I tried to find some other reviews to see if there was any mention of this but all I could find were school papers and descriptions of the book. Anyone know where I can find good critiques not written by 6th graders?Ok, so I didn't completely dislike White Fang. I was irritated by those things but the storyline is very good. I was surprised when I found out it was written after The Call of the Wild because it seems a little more rough. It reads like a first book, where The Call of the Wild seems more polished. In both books I really enjoyed the interplay between the main characters and the other dogs. The dogs seemed more real than the people. This makes complete sense, since the story is told from the point of view of the dog. The other dogs would be the ones that Buck and White Fang knew the best. London accomplishes this very well. I also enjoyed the exchange between Buck and Thornton and White Fang and Scott. Being an animal lover and having dogs all my life, I know the power of the love from an animal. I was impressed by how Scott won over White Fang. His devotion to Scott reminds me of my boyfriend's dog, Skillet, who treats Jeff as if he hung the moon and my dog, Loki, who treats me the same way. Both of these dogs were rescued also. There seems to be something that happens to a dog who is rescued and loved that makes them more devoted than a dog who comes to you as a puppy, like my other dog, Aurora. She obviously loves me and I love her very much but Loki and Skillet become visibly upset just being out of our presence. I was also impressed that Buck remained with Thornton even when he wanted to be free simply because he loved this man. Many people may say this is anthropomorphizing, that animals can't love like this. I say they have never given themselves to an animal enough to feel that love.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this book....I've read other books from the point of view of animals and they have all seemed to fall flat..but this book was so exciting and inciteful. I felt that the writer truly understood the canine mind. You absolutely fall in love with White Fang and want to stand up for him, cheer for him, or cry for him throughout the book...it's a heartwarming story.
  • (4/5)
    White Fang is the story of wolf/dog who descend from Kiche, a wolf/dog who runs the wild in ??anartica? The story begins with two man traveling across the dark frozen tundra with 8 dogs a sled and a coffin. But the wolf continuously attacks all the dogs and the one man traveler. The wolf is then found by it's "owner" gray bear where White Fang grows up, learning to become a fighter to survive in the pack for food and for his life. The vocabulary and the writing style takes some time to get your mouth around. This is an intriguing and sometimes intense story, but not a fast read.
  • (5/5)
    I used to confuse this with London's "Call of the Wild," and stupidly so. White Fang is three times meaner than Buck ever became. Hee. Curious that London's pieces have become Young Adult classics over the years.
  • (4/5)
    Though I responded with boyish enthusiasm to 'The Call of the Wild' many years ago and it re-echoes in memory, I had not read 'White Fang' or any of London's other books until now. I don't think 'White Fang' quite compares with its companion novel stylistically - the later chapters in particular are too obviously allegorical and predictable - but it is equally rugged, energetic and thrilling. London excels at seeing the world through the dog wolf's eyes, and he also manages the difficult and necessary task of shifting the narrative viewpoint occasionally to move the story along at critical points. He is least successful with his human portrayals, especially the dialogue which reads as if it has been written on cardboard with too thick a pen, but he is entirely at home in the Yukon where it stands on the cusp between traditional existence and 'civilisation' in the trail of the gold rush. His evocation of the animal and human struggles in these harsh surroundings - with very survival constantly under threat - is supremely vivid and vital, inked as it were in blood.
  • (4/5)
    I don't want to get too critical of this book but it is ironic that the author reversed the very thing I liked best about The Call of the Wild: the ruthless ending. I suppose that this book ended with a ruthless event but not with a wildness of mind and life. I thought that parts one and two were simply brilliant. The beginning of the book was gripping and exciting and a great way to introduce the reader to White Fang.

    All in all, I enjoy this book very much... I just thought it got too sappy and lovey-dovey in the end. Also, I did not really enjoy the deification of humans to the extent it was used. The first couple of references would have sufficed to make the point of the wolf's point of view.
  • (3/5)
    Classic story of a wold-dog hybrid named White Fang. It's kind of the reversal of Jack London's other work "The Call of the Wild" wherein the animal starts off in human society and goes feral. White Fang is born wild and ends up with a beloved master. The point appears to be that nature is savage and brutal ("Eat or be eaten!"), and that man can be even more savage and brutal, or let the power of love and gentleness overcome.
  • (5/5)
    For some reason, though I had it when I was little, I never read White Fang. I think I was afraid of anthropomorphism. I figured it was going to be kind of cutesy, not really worth my time. Much as I liked Narnia and the like, in fiction based in the real world, I wanted more realism. I obviously never even started reading it. I think the book does a good job of portraying the wolf as a completely different creature from the human -- as well as a human can do without becoming a wolf for a while himself. The slow taming of White Fang seemed more or less realistic to me, and my heart was in my mouth in the last couple of pages. The book does make you care about the characters, particularly White Fang and his final master.

    I was especially intrigued by the idea of wolves/dogs seeing humans as their gods. White Fang's view of his gods reminded me of the ancient Greek pantheon -- all those jealous and fighting gods, some more powerful than others...

    I'm glad I finally did read this book.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book. I have read this upwards of 20 times, and it never gets old! His description of wolves is almost magical. Very interesting perspective and easy to read.