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Invisible Inkling

Invisible Inkling

Written by Emily Jenkins

Narrated by Michael Goldstrom


Invisible Inkling

Written by Emily Jenkins

Narrated by Michael Goldstrom

ratings:
4/5 (5 ratings)
Length:
2 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Apr 26, 2011
ISBN:
9780062104649
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

The thing about Hank's new friend Inkling is, he's invisible.

No, not imaginary. Inkling is an invisible bandapat, a creature native only to the Peruvian Woods of Mystery. (Or maybe it is the Ukrainian glaciers. Inkling hardly ever gets his stories straight.)

Now Inkling has found his way to Brooklyn and into Hank's laundry basket on his quest for squash-bandapats' favorite food. But Hank has bigger problems than helping Inkling fend off maniac doggies and search for yummy pumpkins: Bruno Gillicut is a lunch-stealing dirtbug caveperson and he's got to be stopped. And who better to help stand up to a bully than an invisible friend?

Publisher:
Released:
Apr 26, 2011
ISBN:
9780062104649
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

I grew up in the Boston area in the 1970s. My mother was a preschool teacher and my father a playwright. I remember visiting my mother’s classroom and reading to the children there; even more vividly, I remember sitting in the back row of theater after theater, watching rehearsals—seeing stories come to life. My mother read me countless picture books, but at my father’s house there wasn’t much of that nature. He read me what was at hand: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Sherlock Holmes stories. He also made up stories for me and recounted the plots of Shakespeare’s plays. I was a raw child. In fact, I am a raw adult. This is a hard quality to live with sometimes, but it is a useful quality if you want to be a writer. It is easy to hurt my feelings, and I am unable to watch the news or read about painful subjects without weeping. I was often called oversensitive when I was young, but I’ve learned to appreciate this quality in myself, and to use it in my writing. Growing up, I spent large parts of my life in imaginary worlds: Neverland, Oz, and Narnia, in particular. I read in the bath, at meals, in the car, you name it. Around the age of eight, I began working on my own writing. My early enterprises began with a seminal picture book featuring a heroic orange sleeping bag, followed by novel-length imitations of The Wolves of Willoughby Chase by Joan Aiken and Pippi Longstocking by Astrid Lindgren. I have never kept journals or notebooks for my own sake. I am a writer who writes always with the idea of an audience in mind—and at nine I was determined to share my Pippi story with the world. I got my father to type it up in a book format and photocopy it fifty times. Then he took me to an artist friend’s studio, where we silkscreened fifty copies of a drawing I’d made for the cover. I gave it to everyone I knew. That was my first book. I have always been interested in picture books as a form, which stems (I suppose) from my background in theater. I am fascinated by the intersection of words and images— the way the meanings of words can be altered by changing their presentation. An actor varies her intonation or an illustrator changes a line—and the story is new. In college, I studied illustrated books from an academic standpoint. I went to Vassar, where children’s book writer Nancy Willard was on the faculty. She introduced me to illustrator Barry Moser, and the interview he gave me was the centerpiece of my senior thesis. While I was there, I spent three years as a student assistant in Vassar’s lab pre-school, and after graduation found work as an assistant teacher in a Montessori school, teaching six- to nine-year-olds. That year, I began to write a novel with my father—through the mail. I was in Chicago and he was in New York. We thought it would be a fun way to keep in touch. I wrote a chapter—then he wrote a chapter. We rewrote each other’s chapters. And rewrote them again. It took a long time, but eventually that story was published as The Secret Life of Billie’s Uncle Myron. Now I write full time (except when parenting) in a tiny little office in Brooklyn, accompanied by two plump and ancient cats. The walls are raspberry-colored and lined with pictures by the artists I’ve worked with. Emily Jenkins writes books for both adults and children. She has a doctorate in English literature from Columbia and reviews children’s books for The New York Times. At New York University, she teaches a course in writing for children.


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Reviews

What people think about Invisible Inkling

4.0
5 ratings / 5 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    The thing about Hank's new friend Inkling is, he's invisible. No, "not" imaginary. Inkling is an invisible bandapat, a creature native to the Peruvian Woods of Mystery. (Or maybe it is the Ukrainian glaciers. Inkling hardly ever gets his stories straight.) Now Inkling has found his way into Hank's apartment on his quest for squash, a bandapat favorite. But Hank has bigger problems than helping Inkling fend off maniac doggies and searching for pumpkins: Bruno Gillicut is a lunch-stealing, dirtbug caveperson and he's got to be stopped. And who better to help stand up to a bully than an invisible friend?
  • (5/5)
    Great engaging book my 6 year old, 11 year old and 15 year old enjoyed listening to this book together.
  • (4/5)
    If being a nerd with an over-active imagination was not enough of a problem, Hank's best fried moves away just before the start of 4th grade. Fortunately Inkling, a squash-loving invisible creature shows up and helps Hand through a series of problems especially the one with Gillicut the school bully. Very funny would make a good classroom read-aloud.
  • (4/5)
    My thoughts:This was a fun, creative story about what it means to be a friend and to have a friend.It would work well as a read-aloud for elementary students. The theme is friendship, and of course there is a bully! The reader is shown that sometimes there is more to a bully than just the desire to be mean. The author doesn't excuse the bully behavior, but sheds some light on what could be going on "behind the scenes" emotionally for the bully as well as for the bullied.
  • (4/5)
    Hank Wolowitz, please call him Wolowitz, lives with his sister and parents in an apartment above their Brooklyn ice cream shop called the “Big Round Pumpkin: Ice Cream for a Happy World.” His best friend Wainscotting has moved to Iowa City leaving Wolowitz feeling alone. It doesn’t help that Wolowitz is being bullied at school by Gillicut who is taking his sprinkles at lunch each day Even worse – upon complaining to his teacher, Ms. Cherry, Wolowitz is given lame advice and later is accused of being the bully. One day, while at the ice cream shop, Wolowitz drops sprinkles on the floor. When he reaches under the sink to get the fleeing sprinkles he feels something soft but sees nothing there. Later, he watches as a waffle cone walks itself to the edge of the counter and disappears. In the hallway of his apartment, with a neighbor’s dog on a leash, the dog goes crazy wild at an empty corner. Wolowitz swipes his hand through the area to show the canine that nothing is there and feels the furry object again, this time it is shaking in his would-be shoes. Wolowitz has found a lone bandapet.Bandapets, an endangered species, need lots of Vitamin A, so they feed mainly on squash, which is getting scare in their own land. So this bandapet, named Inkling, has come to Brooklyn looking for squash, hoping he has hit the jackpot at the Big Round Pumpkin. Now that Wolowitz has saved Inkling from the dog Inkling is bound by the bandapet code of honor which requires the bandapet stay with the one who saved his life until he is the savior. Inkling and Hank, oops, Wolowitz spend afternoons playing games and eating, simply enjoying their friendship. Soon, Inkling realizes squash is not as plentiful as he thought in Brooklyn and must head north and Wolowitz must face his tormentor and get his sprinkles back. Together they work out a plan that may solve their problems.Invisible Inkling is a fast read and a fun read. Hank Wolowitz is a lovable character and a typical 10 year old boy. Inkling comes along at the best time for Hank, right after his best friend moves away, leaving him without a close companion. With Inkling, Hank has both a new friend and a truly invisible friend. What kid wouldn’t love that! Hank’s father is still stuck in the 1960’s, talking like a hippie and extremely mellow with a sense of idealized peace. Not much help for a boy being bullied. Inkling is a chronic fibber, changing his background story enough to confuse even himself. Still this only endears Inkling more to Hank and the reader. This book won’t help anyone deal with bullies or learn where bandapets originally came from, but it is a funny read most kids will enjoy. note: received from Netgalley, courtesy of the publisher