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The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People

The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People

Written by Stephen R. Covey

Narrated by Stephen R. Covey


The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People

Written by Stephen R. Covey

Narrated by Stephen R. Covey

ratings:
4.5/5 (615 ratings)
Length:
1 hour
Released:
Jan 1, 2000
ISBN:
9781442304925
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

In The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, author Stephen R. Covey presents a holistic, integrated, principle-centered approach for solving personal and professional problems. With penetrating insights and pointed anecdotes, Covey reveals a step-by-step pathway for living with fairness, integrity, honesty, and human dignity -- principles that give us the security to adapt to change and the wisdom and power to take advantage of the opportunities that change creates.

Released:
Jan 1, 2000
ISBN:
9781442304925
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Recognized as one of Time magazine’s twenty-five most influential Americans, Stephen R. Covey (1932–2012) was an internationally respected leadership authority, family expert, teacher, organizational consultant, and author. His books have sold more than twenty-five million copies in thirty-eight languages, and The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People was named the #1 Most Influential Business Book of the Twentieth Century. After receiving an MBA from Harvard and a doctorate degree from Brigham Young University, he became the cofounder and vice chairman of FranklinCovey, a leading global training firm.


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What people think about The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People

4.6
615 ratings / 107 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    I read this because I saw this as one of the central works in thinking about management and leadership. The content is engaging and in my opinion the advice in general enough form to be sound.
  • (5/5)
    Learned how valuable time is wasted on things that seem urgent, but not important. Now I manage my time along the principles in this book. I allocate time based on my values and goals and less on the demands of others--far, far less on those who don't value my time.
  • (5/5)
    I've read this book so many times - it's a really good combination of professional and personal development. Examples are a teensy bit dated, but the principles are universal and evergreen. I'll read it again.
  • (4/5)
    This book was important for me because it inspired me when I was becoming a coach. It also reinforces the important lessons about the importance of discipline in becoming successful.
  • (4/5)
    Good Book!
  • (5/5)
    There is much more to this book and the series of books than I first thought. I thought it was a bundle of cliches and ignored the work required to develop all of the ideas into actual habits, used daily and in all circumstances. I have a lot of work to do on this package.
  • (5/5)
    Deserved Classic

    I somehow managed to miss this one. So far, it's really thought-provoking. I'm a big believer in taking responsibility for your own life, so lots of it is resonating with me.

    Update: finished it yesterday. Some real pearls of wisdom here. I'm already putting some of the listening techniques to good use. A bit repetitive in places, but I can see why it's a classic.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful! Very practical, and useful, personally applicable.
  • (4/5)
    Great book with valuable, motivating info. A little heavy on the case studies, but otherwise very helpful.
  • (5/5)
    This is a wonderful self-help book with a Christian focus. But even if you are not Christian, the basic concepts are still worthwhile. Covey requires you to really look inside yourself and discipline yourself. I could only read the book in short spurts because he makes you THINK!! And not only think, but to apply these concepts takes serious focus and determination.
  • (5/5)
    This book has something for everyones self development. Do you want to remake yourself into a better person, improve your relationship with a spouse, develop better communication skills with you kids, refine your business expertise, enhance your leadership capabilities, prioritize your life, I could go on and on. To quote the book, you learn, that the gate to change can only be opened from the inside. The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People is very well written, There are stories, examples, forms, diagrams and even interactive areas within the book to help you understand concepts. The book breaks down how to be effective in whatever goal you choose. You learn how to prioritize, expand listening skills (great to help you understand your children and spouse), why you must admit mistakes, and how what you say impacts others. By the end of the book you will understand how to develop good attitudes and a winning behavior. I highly recommend his book.
  • (3/5)
    Good information on becoming a successful person. Covey covers habits that can help anyone in either their personal or professional life. The only issues I have with the book is the use of metaphors, anecdotes, and the over-all verbosity. I would have appreciate the book more as a tool if he had kept it simple.
  • (2/5)
    My dad recommended this to me as a must-read. It had been a revelation for him. But contrary to my dad, who has been a teacher all his life, I've been working in corporate serfdom up to now. And I've been exposed to too many corporate seminars, away days, retreats and other HR outings to find anything in this book a revelation. Maybe all those well-meaning presenters got their input from this very book (in fact, I suspect that a large part of them did), and so I maybe should have read it earlier in my life for me to find it useful. I'd recommend it to people between 25 and 35 who work in large professional environments and score relatively low on emotional intelligence (that would have been me, back in the day). Being over 40, I found the book had a handful of good ideas, but those were eclipsed by the author's style, which I found a little repetitive, trite and sanctimonious. As it stands, I got my main life lessons not from self-help books like this, but from walls (by butting my head repeatedly into them, a slightly more unpleasant but fairly efficient learning method).
  • (4/5)
    Excellent book which really makes you feel positive and like you can become a better, more organised and happier person.
  • (5/5)
    I have read this book since about 10 years ago, which is one book that is very good in uplifting terms about the personality I have ever met.Finished reading it, I bought about 6 pieces more, then I gave it to my sister & close friends.In overall, the book is very good because:* A clear systematic discussion* Writing style that is easily understood* Clarified by using the analogy, many case examples, drawing diagrams, etc.* Comprehensive coverage of our selfhoodI am sure this book will be very useful for everyone who reads it.
  • (3/5)
    I have read this book numerous times and come away convicted to work harder at being more effective every time I read it. I think that the content and principles in this book are, for the most part, spot on and very helpful. The deficit that this book carries is that these are seven habits for a very specific personality group and mindset. If you are a flighty, creative type save yourself the frustration of trying to cram yourself into a different shaped mold. Read it once, figure out a personal application, and then turn it into paper mache.
  • (5/5)
    A great book on how to live the good life. The principles really get to the heart of the human experience and go beyond quick and easy measures to increase one's productivity. If you want to maintain a happy, peaceful balanced life in an increasingly chaotic world, then this book is for you.
  • (4/5)
    I was given this book by my mother for a graduation gift. Then she actually made me read it before I left for college. Great motivational book on who to be successful in every endeavor of life. Most like overdue for a re-read.
  • (4/5)
    The seven habits are universal and applicable not only at work, but also at home. They deserve reading and re-reading year after year. The only problem I have with the author is that some of the stories told are simply too neat and perfect, and they leave the reader feeling just a bit as if they are being talked down to. The whole "clean and green" story just seems to have been enhanced, and is told with such extreme detail you simply want it to end.
  • (5/5)
    This book is the main text of a secular religion. Stephen Covey is/was a practicing Mormon; this, however, is his personal religion and faith. Reading his preface, Covey says that the more he practices his own principles, the more he realizes that he has not actually put his own principles into practice. This is a religion of salvation by works, though Covey does not say that in so many words. On page 11, Covey wrote that the ultimate source of his principles is God.I say this is a secular religion because there are scant references to God or Scripture, but each principle is referred to as an ultimate principle. A Jew, Muslim, Hindu, Mormon, Catholic, Unitarian, or Baptist could all equally practice Covey's principles without equivocation. So, the principles are useful insofar as they are also utilitarian; Covey's ideas are dangerous insofar as they place human effort above God's Sovereignty and Grace. There is no mercy here, only work and self effort.Be careful reading and implementing the principles of this books to not lose sight of Whose we are, and Who is really in control.
  • (5/5)
    Summary: Let's face it. Apply every true principle in this book and you can't help but be living life to it's very fullest. This book will be just as true and important 100 years from now as it is today.
  • (3/5)
    Just got back from a great, short trip to Ankara where I've secured housing for my family. But my departure coincided with the end of a road trip and family reunion in Chicago which means I had time to knock out a couple more books before New Years.

    7 Habits of Highly Effective People - Stephen R. Covey. I had never read Covey's book, but I assume that almost everyone I know who has held some type of leadership or management position has read it as it's probably the all-time bestselling management/leadership book and easily one of the most influential.

    The Seven Habits:
    1. Be Proactive - means not blaming others for your circumstances but owning up to them yourself.
    2. Begin with the End in Mind - Character matters and underlies everything else. You should have a mission statement that sets out your goal. Each day you "flex your proactive muscles" to make it happen.
    3. Put First Things First - Tasks fall into one of four categories and you should focus on the ones that are important but not necessarily urgent. That will help guide your organization and keep things from becoming important and urgent, ie: a crisis.
    4. Think Win-Win - Negotiate hard. It's a little like Adam Smith or David Ricardo's idea that two parties don't enter a transaction unless both benefit. So, maximize your benefit and make sure the other party feels it is winning too.
    5. Seek First to Understand, Then be Understood - This helps generate Win-Win, and is a basic sales technique. Don't expect to get what you want without respecting the other party's wants.
    6. Synergize - Be an effective leader that fosters teamwork and brings out the best in everyone. It's more than the whole being greater than the sum of its parts, but that's the basic idea.
    7. Sharpen the Saw - Take time to rest and do activities that improve your physical health and spiritual well-being.

    I don't know how many hundreds of books are out there that have built on Covey's concepts. There are a lot of basic, timeless truths that he puts simply and I guess that's why this book is so hugely popular. I'd like to put him in a room with Frederick Taylor and see how it goes.

    Reading this book tempts me to size up leaders of organizations by how well they follow the seven habits. I like thinking about the first three the best, particularly in evaluating my time management. Is what I'm doing right now important, and how urgent is it?

    I give it 3.5 stars.
  • (4/5)
    There's some solid advice here. Even if Covey was a Morman, and there is a bit in this book about "natural laws" as set up by God. I still think there's some useful tools in the 7 habits. I feel I got something good out of this book, especially about seeking first to understand.
  • (5/5)
    This version of The 7 Habits was the first of many, many iterations that Stephen Covey published under the 7 Habits umbrella. No doubt due to the success of the franchise. As a self-help reader I can vouch for the worth of the original though I have not read any of the others.It's too easy to scoff at the habits as obvious, just as it's too easy to scoff at self-help in general. Actions speak louder than words, and putting habits like Covey's into practice is hard work. If you're curious about self-help, or maybe a little skeptical about its usefulness, then I recommend starting here.
  • (3/5)
    Disappointing in a way. Some good points, but the good advice is scattered between long-winded buzzspeak. The stories are the weakest part. All the people involved talk exactly like the author and the situations are stretched. There's little, if any, followup with the people who "sudden stand up during meeting x and see the light" to see if it really helped or if they're just the type of people who seek attention by doing this type of thing. I can tell stories too, but that doesn't make the scenarios any more likely to happen.Some of the management stuff reminded me of peopleware, which I preferred. The whole part about mission statements seems a little...well, hollow. (What if there was a great team, but they never came up with a mission statement? Was there ever an only adquate or bad group and they became successful because they came up with a mission statement? The latter is what I'm more curious about.
  • (4/5)
    A great book. It invites us to think deeply about our goal in life and cultivate habits that will aid us in achieving it across all our life roles.
  • (4/5)
    It's a classic. So many books have been based off of the core values set in this book so if you've read any productivity, self help, leadership, or anything similar you're likely to know some of the content in this book.

    I like to occasionally go "back to the basics" or hit the classics as a reminder of some of the things I can/should be doing to be a better business person or a family man and I tend to find this book helps me reset my habits. That's not a bad thing at all.
  • (4/5)
    This is not a quick fix book. I will take time and focus for any of the advice given in the book to make big changes. That said I've just finished the book and noticed some positive changes in myself.

    This book does have "buzzwords" that other reviews have complained about but that is because the book made them that way. People just repeat the words instead of doing the hard work.

    This book does have one flaw the writer talks about not projecting your paradigms on others Covey forgot that not all his readers will be Christian.
  • (5/5)
    I deduct a half-star because the word paradigm makes me itch, but I would have to grant that it is in some sense the very type of a life-altering book. You could definitely trim some fat and read it in "princess bride, the good parts" mode though.
  • (5/5)
    great book, really helped me realize i could take better control of my life