Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
What's Left of Me: The Hybrid Chronicles, Book One

What's Left of Me: The Hybrid Chronicles, Book One

Written by Kat Zhang

Narrated by Kim Mai Guest


What's Left of Me: The Hybrid Chronicles, Book One

Written by Kat Zhang

Narrated by Kim Mai Guest

ratings:
4/5 (48 ratings)
Length:
9 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Sep 18, 2012
ISBN:
9780062223821
Format:
Audiobook

Description

I should not exist. But I do.

Eva and Addie started out the same way as everyone else-two souls woven together in one body, taking turns controlling their movements as they learned how to walk, how to sing, how to dance. But as they grew, so did the worried whispers. Why aren't they settling? Why isn't one of them fading? The doctors ran tests, the neighbors shied away, and their parents begged for more time. Finally Addie was pronounced healthy and Eva was declared gone. Except, she wasn't. . . .

For the past three years, Eva has clung to the remnants of her life. Only Addie knows she's still there, trapped inside their body. Then one day, they discover there may be a way for Eva to move again. The risks are unimaginable-hybrids are considered a threat to society, so if they are caught, Addie and Eva will be locked away with the others. And yet . . . for a chance to smile, to twirl, to speak, Eva will do anything.

Publisher:
Released:
Sep 18, 2012
ISBN:
9780062223821
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Kat Zhang is an avid traveler, and after a childhood spent living in one book after another, she now builds stories for other people to visit, including the Hybrid Chronicles.

Related to What's Left of Me

Related Audiobooks

Reviews

What people think about What's Left of Me

3.9
48 ratings / 40 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    The first in the hybrid chronicles series, follows Addie and her hybrid Eva as they try to survive in a world where they are hunted. Although Eva grows weaker, she and Addie have a full inner-dialog. Addie is the dominant soul meaning she moves, speaks and acts for the duo. Suddenly a girl named Hallie is everywhere Addie is and wants to be friends. Hallie also is a hybrid. Eventually they are discovered and taken to an institution where Addie & Eva realize they need to fight back in order to survive intact. There is a anti-foreign climate in the U.S. and some things going on internationally that seem important but aren't made clear in this volume of the series. The characters and idea are compelling.
  • (4/5)
    Extremely readable: I was halfway through and then suddenly I was at the end. I enjoy the premise of two 'souls' born in the one body though given the very little I know about multiples I'd love to see that premise examined a little more closely. Because two is such an uncomfortable number: does it ever happen that three or four are born in one body? Or that only one is?The sequels are bound to explore the international politics more, which is definitely a puzzle. The domestic situation is drawn very plausibly, even if the historic details are fuzzy: an America rampantly xenophobic and terrified of commies terrorists hybrids under the bed is no stretch at all. And the various pressures put on parents to consent to having their children taken away... yeah. My main beef is linking the inevitable government conspiracy to the vaccines. I feel like anti-vaxxers don't need yet another fictional argument. The plot follows a predictable shape for the first part of a YA dystopia trilogy. The characters likewise aren't highly original as characters: you've got your heroine, your love interest, your moustache-twirling villain, your heel-face turn, and so forth. But the relationship between Eva and Addie is one we rarely see elsewhere, or could expect to. Very cool.
  • (3/5)
    I was left not sure how I felt about this book. On one hand, I enjoyed the premise even though I am somewhat burned out on dystopian books. On the other, after getting about halfway through, it seemed to be the same old dystopian style story. Government controlling the masses, lies, etc., etc....In this world children are born with two souls, a dominant and recessive. After spending most of their childhood attempting to make the two work together, the recessive soul fades away leaving the dominant soul alone. When this does not happen, they are considered hybrids which the government have deemed dangerous. As the government tries to fix the hybrids (medication, therapists, surgery?) many hybrids attempt to make a life for themselves. Eva and Addie are hybrid and even though they have taken the medications (where does this medication come from? and what is the rest of the world really like?) nothing seems to work. She ends up in a 'hospital' with other hybrids and the typical dystopian story follows.Perhaps I am burned out, but I just felt it was OK. Not great, not bad, just okay.
  • (3/5)
    The two souls idea is incredibly interesting and a unique edition to the dystopian YA genre. The writing needs a bit of polishing, but I'm looking forward to how Zhang continues and resolves the series.
  • (4/5)
    What's Left of Me explores what it might be like to be an unwelcome guest in your own body, within your own mind. In this world, each body is born inhabited by two souls. By age 7, most children have "settled", meaning the recessive soul has faded away leaving only the dominant soul. When this doesn't happen, those left with two souls past puberty are considered hybrid. Hybrids are considered sick and dangerous and are sought out by the government to be hospitalized and corrected.

    Addie is the dominant soul in this story, Eva the recessive. They have spent the past few years pretending that Eva has faded until a schoolmate finds out their secret. The schoolmate, Hally, and her brother Devin are also secretly hybrids as well as being foreign which means they are distrusted in the current political climate. Eva wants to trust them but Addie isn't so sure, the consequences if their secret were revealed could be deadly.

    The story is told from Eva's point of view and was at times very poignant as I was forced to consider what it would be like having to constantly live in my own head pretending that I don't exist to the outside world. The relationship between Addie and Eva felt genuine and the feeling between the two was expressed beautifully in the dialog they shared. With two souls inhabiting the body of each of the characters, you would think that the story would be confusing. Surprisingly, it was not. Each soul had their own individual voice and were easily identified.

    I think that Eva was an especially well written character. Her great longing to be acknowledged, her loneliness, and her genuine love for Addie was beautifully expressed and I found myself continually drawn to her.

    I enjoyed the unusual storyline, the relationships between the characters, and the beautiful writing that compelled me to continue reading late into the night. If I have one complaint about What's Left of Me it is that I would have liked to have had more information about the world and why children were born with two souls and why not settling is considered so dangerous.
  • (3/5)
    Eva and Addie are twin souls in one body - in a somewhat vague future world where "hybrids" (two people/souls in one body) are not unheard of, but not acceptable in society. Through Eva's narration, we learn that many hybrids usually naturally develop into one person: one soul remains dominant, and the other recedes by late childhood. But Eva/Addie aren't so easily suppressed, yet, Eva tries to silence herself -"disappear" - knowing that her parents have enough struggle with their little brother Lyle who is ill and must get proper treatment. But Hally, a new friend at school, persists in drawing Eva/Addie in, and they soon discover that they aren't the only hybrids who may not truly b "settled", in spite of what the doctors and school attempt to do. Hally's brother Devon is also more than he seems, and the story begins to pick up the pace when Eva/Addie's behavior is noted by the authorities. She and Hally and Devon are sent to a scientific hospital, Nornand, in order to be studied and "settled" once and for all. But when Eva/Addie discover how they are treating even the youngest of the inmates, she knows she must leave - the challenge will be if she can take all of the patients with her. Definitely a psychological study of "twin souls" within one person - and how society treats individuals- but with enough action and conflict by the second half to encourage teen readers to hang in there til the end.
  • (4/5)
    What's Left of Me explores what it might be like to be an unwelcome guest in your own body, within your own mind. In this world, each body is born inhabited by two souls. By age 7, most children have "settled", meaning the recessive soul has faded away leaving only the dominant soul. When this doesn't happen, those left with two souls past puberty are considered hybrid. Hybrids are considered sick and dangerous and are sought out by the government to be hospitalized and corrected.

    Addie is the dominant soul in this story, Eva the recessive. They have spent the past few years pretending that Eva has faded until a schoolmate finds out their secret. The schoolmate, Hally, and her brother Devin are also secretly hybrids as well as being foreign which means they are distrusted in the current political climate. Eva wants to trust them but Addie isn't so sure, the consequences if their secret were revealed could be deadly.

    The story is told from Eva's point of view and was at times very poignant as I was forced to consider what it would be like having to constantly live in my own head pretending that I don't exist to the outside world. The relationship between Addie and Eva felt genuine and the feeling between the two was expressed beautifully in the dialog they shared. With two souls inhabiting the body of each of the characters, you would think that the story would be confusing. Surprisingly, it was not. Each soul had their own individual voice and were easily identified.

    I think that Eva was an especially well written character. Her great longing to be acknowledged, her loneliness, and her genuine love for Addie was beautifully expressed and I found myself continually drawn to her.

    I enjoyed the unusual storyline, the relationships between the characters, and the beautiful writing that compelled me to continue reading late into the night. If I have one complaint about What's Left of Me it is that I would have liked to have had more information about the world and why children were born with two souls and why not settling is considered so dangerous.
  • (4/5)
    I've been following Kat Zhang for a very long time, and I've been interested in reading this book FOREVER. But for some reason, I never got around to it. Oh, how I wish I had.First off, the writing is fantastic. Kat really has a way with words; there's no doubt about that. I especially love how she writes character interactions, and I think that's what made the book so strong. Although I love, love, love Eva/Ryan, the most interesting character interactions are between Eva and Addie themselves. I have to admit that I'm not particularly sure how I feel about Addie (especially after reading Once We Were), but I can say that I love the way they interact and react to one another. It feels so real. I can understand where both of them are coming from, even if I don't always agree.I also enjoyed the premise. I know a lot of people label this book as dystopian, but I don't view it that way. I'm not going to go that far into this particular matter, but I think the idea of two souls sharing a body is a really cool and new idea. I think Kat set everything up extremely well, and I could imagine living in that kind of world. I felt as if I were a part of the setting and of the book. It felt real. The explanations weren't too complicated, and they were well-woven into the plot.However, the world-building also came with some consequences. Mostly, it was the fact that having to set everything up slowed the plot down. It wasn't boring or slow per say, but it didn't keep me as interested in the book. I get it--it was important to set everything up. All of it was necessary information. When you build a world, this happens a lot. And while I think Zhang's writing made up for it, plus the fact that I knew it would become more fast-paced, it made it hard to get into the book. Even the "fast-paced" parts did feel slow, but that may have been more from what I've been reading prior to the book than the book itself.All in all, what stands out about the book is the characters and their relationships, the very premise of the book, and of course, Kat Zhang's spectacular writing. I'd definitely encourage everyone to read this book!
  • (3/5)
    Interesting idea - two souls sharing one body. What is supposed to happen naturally is "settling", where one of the souls takes control and the other just fades away, but in the case of these two, it just doesn't happen.
  • (3/5)
    At some point, goofy as the point is, it felt like there had been hybrids at work on this book. Because there suddenly were absurd puns and wordplay ongoing. Like the heroine thinking about the recesses of her mind during recess. The bits about lying and back. I just wanted to get this observation out of the way. I felt this was the book where the heroine shows the least amount of heroism. This book was a balancing act. In one way, the main character was Hally/Lissa. Everything converged one one question...would she die? Would she survive? From the very beginning I had marked Hally as the sacrificial goat that would get the plot moving. The way the third act's rescue went through made me give a star more than I initialed. It was impossible to pull it off, but my disbelief went suspended of its own accord. I wanted to believe this conclusion was believable, and suddenly it was. All credit to the author. The latter's lack of research was all the more admirable for it showed guts to try undertake writing this book alone. I cared for this book. Others should too, that's my recommendation.
  • (3/5)
    Rating: 2.5 of 5I was so excited to read this book... begin sigh...I read faithfully at my usual pace up to chapter nineteen, page 199, and it took all my willpower to go that far. After page 199 I did a speed read to the end. I just never connected enough with either Addie or Eva, or their world and the hybrids, to really care. In other words, I wasn't lost in the story or emotionally invested in anything about it.Addie, supposedly the dominant soul, was too passive. And there wasn't enough shown or even told about their world to support her behavior as self-protection or a survival mechanism; she came across as fundamentally weak. For example, why were the government and citizens anti-hybrid to begin with?? Why was settling mandatory?? There wasn't enough shown to demonstrate Addie was anything other than Eva's puppet. Despite, supposedly, Eva having no control / say / life whatsoever.The beginning of the story definitely could've done with some beefing up in the character and worldbuilding departments to at least show the relationship between the two souls and what they meant to each other. To set up why and how the world was such a scary place for hybrids. And the ending was SO typical young adult, which I'm sure the intended audience will eat up. I did not. As is, I dunno... the characters and world all seemed ... superficial and flat So why round up to three stars? The whole notion of two souls, one body; one dominant soul, one recessive soul - it intrigued me. Though, sadly, not enough that I plan to read book two in the Hybrid Chronicles.I'll be donating my copy of What's Left of Me to the local library. End sigh.
  • (4/5)
    4 stars for originality.
  • (5/5)
    Warning: May contain spoilers What's left of me is one of those books that grip you from the very first chapter. The story is about Addie and Eva, two souls in the same body but very different from each other. Set from Eva's point of you, she tells you about the world she lives in where everyone is born with two souls, and how when you reach a certain age the repressive soul should in theory die off, leaving the stronger soul to occupy the body alone. Trouble is, Eva never wanted to go, and when at 12 Addie and Eva still hadn't settled after being given an extension past the normal age, the decided the only thing to do was to hide it from everyone. So Addie took over the body full time, leaving Eva only alive in Addie's mind, very much alive and breathing just without any motor skills. They had become what was only known as a hybrid, what her country had lead her and everyone to believe was a dangerous thing to be.They moved school and town in hope of starting over, away from all the people that still talked even though Addie was now declared 'normal'. And everything seemed be going great, until a girl at school called Hallie pays more interest in Addie and Eva than they think she should. Terrified that she somehow knows their secret, they avoid her at every cost, shooting down every invitation to hang out or spend time together. Eva who feels sorry for her, finally convinces Addie that maybe she's just lonely, only to discovery that not only did Hallie (and her brother Devon) know their secret, but they were hybrids just like them. And even though they are scared at first, the promise of Eva being taught to move again is too good to miss.But Hallie and Lissa, Devon and Ryan aren't the only ones who know about the 3 hybrids and soon they find themselves locked in Nornad Clinic with no hope of ever getting out.This book is without a doubt one of the best I have read this year. If this is what we get as a debut I cant wait to see what else she has up her sleeve. What's Left of Me was well written, clever and heart warming. Never confusing when the story would switch from Eva's thoughts to Addie's, and all in all just a wonderful book. The characters were brilliant and unlike most YA novels out there, it wasn't centered around love or a love triangle. Yes there was a love story in there somewhere but it wasn't over powering and it was so refreshing. I'm so upset that I have to wait for book 2, but I guess that's a blessing, because if the others where out already I would have finished them and been left wanting more still haha. I'd recommend this to anyone who likes YA scfi.Also for anyone who has read this and is looking for something to read while waiting for the second book I suggest you read The Host. Don't be put off by the author, its actually an amazing book and just like What's Left of Me its about two souls in one body, only difference being one of them is an alien parasite. Been one of my favourite books for a few years now :)
  • (5/5)
    Brilliant novel about two souls residing in one body and the danger these "hybrids" seem to represent to the government. Glad to have this recommended to me and I can't wait to read the next one!
  • (4/5)
    I skimmed through the reviews. Very interesting, the different opinions people have on this book! Here's mine, written short, since there's already so much said. I'll try to keep to things I didn't already read:1. I liked that these characters have parents who do a good job raising them and love them.2. I liked the jolt of surprise at the end. It fit perfectly with what I'd learned in the book but hadn't connected up. 3. I think when this author rubs some of the 'new author' off, she's going to become a major force in Young Adult fiction. And good for her if I'm right.4. The market has become saturated with dystopian ya, so it was hard not to yawn upon being presented with yet another. When I reminded myself to view this book as a 'book', NOT a 'dystopian novel' I let go of many preconceived notions of how dystopian worlds work. I'm glad I did.5. As much as I like Days of the New music, I must admit it would be nice at this point if the song 'What's Left for Me' would get out of my head. It pops in every time I see the book title. (It's a nice song though, so if you go listen to it and get it stuck in your head too you probably won't be mad at me.)6. While I've grown a bit annoyed at series books in young adult fiction, because I feel like authors/publishers are just trying to milk that cow, this book was paced properly in my opinion. I am intrigued enough by this world to want to know more. I liked that the main characters weren't glossy normal-kid-to-instant heroes types. They acted dumb sometimes, selfish sometimes, and were basically real people. 7. This ended up longer than I planned. Thanks for reading it and I hope you have a nice day.
  • (3/5)
    It was good, but it was a little confusing. I still had a lot of questions at the end of the book.
  • (3/5)
    What's Left of Me has a unique premise, distinctly different than I've encountered before: what if everyone in the world was born with two "souls," two separate people living inside one body? Just that was enough to convince me that I should read this. So I was happily surprised to encounter this book in my school library.

    I've given this only three stars because, while it was good, and a fun read, it was also geared more toward YA/teen.
  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    What's Left of Me is set in a world where children are born with two souls. As the child grows up one soul becomes dominant and the other recessive. Eventually in the childs life the recessive soul will fade away leaving only the dominant soul. However some children don't settle, and what happens then? At 15 Addie and Eva are faced with that problem.In a world where being a Hybrid is considered dangerous and a threat, Addie and Eva have to keep the fact that they have not yet settled a secret. But, as obstacles get in their way, can they? What's Left of Me was great and i did love it, but i just can't bring myself to give it five stars. I would love to rate it so high because the pace was crisp; the plot is brilliant and original beyond belief, and the concept that the story is told from the recessive soul, Eva, was a great twist on the common narrator. Everything was refreshing, fun, and there was never a dull or boring moment when reading What?s Left of Me, but it just missed? something. In What?s Left of Me, we're told straight away that hybrids are unstable and dangerous, and if you have suspicions that someone might be a hybrid, report them immediately. However during the book we arent told why hybrids are so dangerous, and all the hybrids we are introduced to seem harmless enough. So whenever they are spoken about like that all i could think was ?Why?? It could be possible that they aren't any more dangerous than a normal person and they are just thought of this way because they are an anomaly in their normal society, and that's why there never was an explanation? Again, I'm not too sure, but I hope everything is cleared up in book two. As well as that little world-building flaw, there was a flaw in the writing for me that, while little at first, grew to be an annoyance the more I read the book. Zhang?s prose is beautiful, and, like the plot, the writing is crisp and it makes for fast reading, but, unfortunately Zhang uses an overwhelming amount of repetition when writing. At first, this was something I was able to look over easily, but, like I said, as I read more and more, and the use of repetition became more and more frequent, I became annoyed, but not overly so that I was unable to enjoy the book. And lastly in the things that make me conflicted on whether I should be giving What?s Left of Me four or five stars was that the ending felt too anticlimactic given all the buildup for it throughout the novel. It just didn't have the wow factor i was looking for (and expecting) Now onto less ranty things about What?s Left of Me?s rare flaws, and much more praising on everything else that?s in What?s Left of Me, because everything else was amazing. Eva?s voice and experiences (or lack of) were heartbreaking, as was reading about her longing to talk, to move her fingers even?all of the things we normally take for granted?but she was physically unable to do. And, although for most of the bookshe couldn't even move her fingers, she was still stronger than half of the heroines in YA literature, and that?s saying something. Another thing to absolutely love about What?s Left of Me is that all of the characters are flawed and believable, as are all of their relationships, especially the sisterly relationship between Eva and Addie, which was portrayed expertly. And, while there is some romance in What?s Left of Me, it takes up a very minor part in the actual story, and you might even forget there was a romance to begin with (like me). Overall, despite minor issues i had while reading i loved the book and will happily recommend it to all my friends and also to anyone looking for an original and refreshing new YA novel.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    I?m so mad at myself for not reading this book as soon as it came out! It?s one of the most unique books I?ve ever read! Debut author, Kat Zhang, brings a fresh new voice to YA literature.While I wouldn?t really categorize this book as dystopian, it definitely takes place in a very different world, a world where everybody is born with two souls (a dominant soul and a recessive soul). That is until one of them settles. Settling is when the ?recessive? soul fades away. Forever.It was a little weird at first, getting used to two characters, two very different voices in one body. But soon you get used to it, and become so immersed in this other world that it seems normal. Our main character(s) are Addie and Eva. We see things from both perspectives and hear both girls? thoughts but I would consider Eva to be the main focus of the story. As the recessive soul who never faded away, we get to see things from her side of things. What it was like to be forgotten and ignored by her own family, everyone except Addie of course.Every character in this book from main to secondary was so well developed. Even the bad guys you couldn't help but appreciate. I loved Addie, Eva, Hally, Devon, Kitty, and all the characters SO much!There is a slight romantic aspect to the book; so slight I almost didn?t mention it. With two people in each body you can imagine how awkward that is?While this is just the start of a brilliant new series the ending was satisfying on it?s own and could be read as a standalone. But trust me, your going to want to read book two. I snagged a copy at BEA and tore right through it!
  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    3.5/5 stars.What's Left of Me is one of those books that I felt everyone but me had already read. Not only had they read it, but they'd raved about it so much it made me nervous to actually pick it up. And while I don't think I ultimately liked it as much as most folks have, once I got past a rather slow start, the book had nice flow, a unique plot, and intriguing characters that I did end up ultimately enjoying.This book is told from a unique perspective, because for much of the book, Eva - the recessive soul who was meant to die away, but didn't - isn't in any kind of actual control of the body she shares with dominant soul, Addie. That set-up made for unique storytelling that was very much focused on Eva's feelings and Addie's actions. One thing I wish was explained in more detail is how the world came to be this way. Is this our world that's been changed in some way? Or is this a made-up world in which the way we live and are never existed in the first place? I didn't feel that this information was explicitly stated, and made for a lot of questions on my part, and one of the reasons I wasn't completely sold on the story at the start. There is a lot of talk about the scary dangerous hybrids (which Eva and Addie are, although they live in secret) and the effects they've had on the rest of the world, and there's talk about the Americas (which are North, Central and South America all rolled into one giant super-country), but no actual explanations of how it all came to be. I want explanations! Call it the part of me that loves history, but I just feel like it would have really grounded the story and made it more relatable. But then again, that could just be me.Around the 20% mark, though, the book picks up in action, because Addie and Eva are shipped off to a rather frightening clinic due to a suspicion that they are indeed hybrid. The rest of the book is spent with them trying to figure out what's going on at the clinic, and trying to find a way to escape. There's also some romantic developments between Eva and Ryan, made all the more intriguing because Addie isn't at all interested in either Ryan OR his other soul, so she's definitely fighting Eva at every step, even if it's not intentionally. There's also the obvious give and take necessary as Eva becomes stronger, which adds tension to the girls' relationship and makes sharing a body even trickier. The sequel to What's Left of Me seems to focus even more on the girls' issues, so I'm looking forward to seeing how the author has taken that concept and expanded on it.All in all, while I wasn't completely in love with What's Left of Me like most people seem to be, I did find the book compelling and unique in equal measures. Eva is a wonderful narrator, and I liked watching her growth and strength. She and Addie are definitely two totally different girls, so the fact that they have to share a body - and only one can be in control at a time - makes for interesting developments that you definitely don't see every day. I'm looking forward to reading the sequel and seeing how their journey progresses.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)
    This was a case of a good book but at a bad time. I've been on a huge contemporary, mainly new adult contemporary, binge lately and I can't get enough. When What's Left of Me came in for me at the library after being on hold for weeks, I new I had to read it now or risk never giving it a chance again. I had also just filled my e-reader with a ton of fantastic looking new adult contemporaries that I'm super anxious to break into! All of those factors combined, I felt rushed and forced to get through this book and was never quite able to get fully immersed into the story. However, I honestly feel that if I would have picked up What's Left of Me before my current contemporary addiction, I would have really loved it.

    What this book does have is uniqueness. The whole premise is very different from anything else I've read in the same genre this year and Kat Zhang does a very good job with it. To be honest, the setting of the book almost had me more interested than the actual story itself. I found myself very curious about the world it was taking place in and wanting to learn more. Unfortunately, information about this world was given only on an as needed basis. However, I can see where this would be refreshing for some readers. There's not as much set-up as there is in a lot of other books in the genre and we are able to get directly into the story a lot sooner.

    The story is original and Kat Zhang's writing style is wonderful, but I did not find myself connecting with the characters. The closest I came to it was with Eva (who's point-of-view the story was told in). And I didn't like Ava very much at all. For me, this didn't detract from the story though. Whereas I didn't connect with the characters, I still enjoyed the storyline. I stayed curious about and interested in everything going on. Surprisingly, it was the last chapter that hooked me and ensured that I'll be reading the next book in the series.

    Like I mentioned before, I don't think I can do this book the justice it actually deserves, only because of the circumstances surrounding my reading of it. If the summary sounds good to you and it's something you feel in the mood for, I definitely recommend it.
  • (5/5)
    Eva and Addie are two souls sharing the same body. In their society children are born with two souls and two identities. As they grow they "settle" and one soul fades away leaving the other in control. But there are people who don't settle, and the two souls continue to exist in one body. They are called "hybrids" and the government hates them, fears them, and hunts them down. Even as children.

    I really enjoyed this one. It's an interesting concept- two souls in one body. The writing was powerful and not flowery, which fit the story. I thought the descriptions of two souls in one body were well done, though I would have liked to find out more "why" and "how." Why are two souls born into one body? How did the fear of hybrids come about? Hopefully we'll get more information in later books.
  • (4/5)
    Plot: 3 stars
    Characters: 4 stars
    Style: 4 stars
    Pace: 4 stars

    A bit predictable, follows a lot of the fairly standard dystopian tropes. But still enjoyable despite that. I love the concept, and it took a while to get out of my brain after finishing it last night.
  • (4/5)
    This was such a great book! Beautiful writing and fantastic pacing. The story sucks you in immediately and never disappoints. It is definitely a unique story idea and parts of it really get you thinking. I can't wait to get my hands on the rest of this series.
  • (4/5)
    Amazing concept, story-telling and a killer plot, Kat Zhang has created quite the page turner. What?s left of me after I?ve turned the last page? I?m still not sure.

    In Zhang?s dystopian world of the Americas, people are hybrids; two souls ? I hesitate to call them twin souls, since each soul is very different ? exist in every physical body. It?s still the ultimate twin, though. The souls know each other intimately, they can speak to each other with just a thought, and both have the same definitive motor skills over the body they share.

    But what if the government decided that hybrids were not a viable way to live? What if the government forced one soul to disappear ? forever? That?s how the Americas deal with hybrids in What?s Left of Me. Soul-mates are ripped apart through forced vaccinations. And those who don?t respond to the vaccinations? Well?I?ll just let you read it for yourself.

    Zhang has concocted a world is incredibly unique to both the dystopian and young adult genres. I, personally, haven?t read another book quite like this one that was so gripping and enthralling. She brings to light government corruption in a very controlled society who, for the most part, generally accepts that things are the way they are and it?s for their own good (rebels aside, of course. Can?t have a dystopian without rebels!). Her society questions no one. That?s what makes it so scary. And she wrote it splendidly.

    Her writing is beautiful. Her main character is a recessive soul, one who should have faded away with vaccinations, one who slipped under the radar with the help of her sister soul, Addie. When Zhang writes the story of these sister souls in one body, and the world around them, you pay attention. You listen to them. You listen to the recessive soul and what it?s like to be forgotten. Because she has been forgotten by everyone: her parents, doctors, teachers, brothers?everyone but Addie. To write from that perspective takes an enormous amount of talent and I enjoyed reading it just for that fact alone.

    Her characters are alive and real. Zhang takes time to differentiate between each soul and how complex and different they are. Scenes play out where one soul wants one thing (or sometimes, someone) and another soul doesn?t. How do you reconcile that between souls? She manages to somehow create the harmony and conflict between them and it?s beautiful.

    This isn?t to say that What?s Left of Me isn?t without its faults. While I enjoyed reading it immensely, I had a hard time reconciling myself with the fact that Addie?s parents willingly gave her over to a man they had never before laid eyes on, based on his words and a few papers alone saying that he wanted to take Addie to a remote hospital for hybrid treatment. It felt like a very convenient plot-device so Zhang could take the story from point A to point B. I can?t see any parent willingly giving their children up, especially when it seems they love them so much.

    I did like that the romance took a backseat in this story for 90% of it. Sometimes I get romancified out and I just need a break from all the bleeding hearts and cream puffs. Zhang nailed it perfectly with this one.

    But minor quibble aside, I really did enjoy reading What?s Left of Me! It?s a very fresh twist on the dystopian genre and I think readers who enjoyed Stephenie Meyer?s The Host will enjoy What?s Left of Me, for the sheer fascination of souls in bodies and the interplay between them.

    Well done, Ms. Zhang, I can?t wait for the next book.
  • (4/5)
    This was an awesome book. I think it was the idea that sucked me in first. Then the characters. And then the intense story-line. The book was very fast-paced. And any story set in psychiatric-like wards is a nail-biting. If you have seen the movie Changling with Angelina Jolene, you?ll remember her line ?Fuck you and the white horse you rode in on?. That was the line running through my mind the entire time I was reading this book. It?s the same sort of premise. People think the character is crazy, sick, something, etc, and they believe they have a right to ?cure? them. And the character never has a say in the matter because they are not in the right mind or some other excuse. This sort of goes back to my previous review for Matched about freedom, but in these kinds of books it?s also about what personal safety and what is and isn?t natural by societies terms. These books always drive me nuts and I never want to go to the doctor?s office after reading them. How do I really know what they are injecting into me? Haha. Anyways, the reader is always rooting for the character and hoping they break out. I get a little dramatic and always want the character to lash out and do some damage, but as the characters always tell themselves and me, it wouldn?t do any good. But it would make me as a reader fell better. :) So the whole story is an edge of the seat kind of book. And it?s not very long, so the book is easy to get through in a few sittings. The book reminded me of The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer, so if you liked that book, you should like this book. It?s Zhang?s debut novel and I think she did a fantastic job. I?m looking forward to the next book in the series whenever it is published.
  • (5/5)
    "I should not exist. But I do."I received the e-book to review from NetGalley. I also have my own physical copy that I purchased from a local book shop. I have heard so much about this book, and was very excited to read it. The synopsis on the back of the book caught my attention straight away.This is the first novel I have read from Kat Zhang. It's is the first book in The Hybrid Chronicles series. The story is told from Eva's perspective which I thought was interesting as she isn't the dominant soul. You really can feel and understand her thoughts and feelings. I really did feel sorry for her. The opening paragraph even made me connect with this character. The other soul Addie is a more spunky character. At times, she does come across as a little it selfish and annoying like she prefers to remain being the stronger soul. Eva I like more because I admire her determination to remain in the body and not argue with her other connected side. I really liked the friends that Addie & Eva discovered, and their connections were really strong. I really felt anger towards all the doctors and nurses when they said Eva needed to go. You develop such a liking for Eva, you feel like you want to fight for her survival. I thought the relationship between Eva and Ryan was so cute. I was like "awwh".I thought the storyline was strong, and it had me hooked from the beginning. So much was happening, but I wasn't confused and was following with ease. I haven't read a book with this type of story before, so it was a risk in giving it a go, but I'm glad I went for it, as it was an enjoyable read. I enjoyed the theory behind hybrids.The font is easy to follow, and it's simple to know when a particular soul is speaking. The chapters are fairly short, and the book has a total of 343 pages. Although it may seem a chunky-ish book, it was actually a fairly quick read.I really like the cover to this book; how you can see half a face, which is portraying the half soul, and it leaves the other side blank, so mystery is held there. The tag line on the front cover - "Who would you give up to stay alive?" - draws you in.The ending of the book really makes me want to read the next book. Damn you, Kat Zhang! xDOverall, I'm going to give this book five stars because I thoroughly enjoyed the storyline, the characters were well developed, and I was hooked from the beginning. I definitely recommend as it is a really good read.If you like stories with mystery, souls and romance involved, then give it a shot.Happy reading =)
  • (4/5)
    In a world where everyone?s born with two souls, those in the Americas are cut off from the rest of the world, where hybrids persist into adulthood. Inside the Americas, though, people ?settle? as young children, one soul disappearing and the other surviving. Those who don?t are considered threats and taken away for treatment. That?s why Addie hides the persistence of Eva, who still exists even though she can no longer control the body. But a secret like that is hard to keep, especially when strangers show up with their own ideas about hybrids. As you might expect from this brand of YA, most of the bad guys are cartoony, though the refusal to offer any explanation to the protagonist makes much more sense when the protagonist is a kid than it does for an adult. The difficulties of two people sharing one body are presented with enough intensity that you can at least understand why a culture might have convinced itself that singletons are better, even if that?s morally and perhaps biologically wrong (and even if those difficulties are themselves culturally constructed).
  • (4/5)
    I haven't finished reading this book yet, but I like it so far. The idea of duality, of multiple souls, is fascinating and unique. I can't wait to see how it ends!
  • (4/5)
    Review courtesy of Dark Faerie TalesQuick & Dirty: Two sisters fight to stay together in a world that wants to tear them apart. For fans of Stephanie Meyer?s The Host.Opening Sentence: Addie and I were born into the same body, out souls? ghostly fingers entwined before we gasped our very first breath.The Review: Every human is born with two souls. Each have control of their body when they?re young, but as they grow older, they both must settle ? one will take control of their body and the other will fade away. Those who don?t settle get shipped away to a institution ? a place where ?hybrids? are test subjects so they can eventually become ?cured? of their hybridness. Addie and Eva have lived under the radar for sixteen years. People ? even their parents ? think they?ve finally settled after the brutal complications when they were ten. Now they both have a chance at leading a normal life. Until a girl named Hally from their school figures out their secret. But unlike normal people, Hally doesn?t turn them in. In fact, Hally and her brother turn out to be exactly like Addie and Eva ? hybrid. Despite Addie?s protests, Eva wants to hear Hally (or Lissa) out. That turns out to be the biggest mistake (or success depending on how you look at it) in their life. After a month of clandestine sessions of trying to help Eva control her body again, their worst fears become true. When Hally and Lissa are captured by the police on accident, everyone who was close to them (including her brothers Ryan/Devon) is called in for questioning. But when questioning becomes probing and probing becomes investigating, Addie and Eva are taken away to what they tried so hard to avoid. When the outside world tries to tear two sisters apart, who will win? Relationships will be tested, enemies will be made and morals will be questioned. What would you do if you were only one half of a whole?As you can probably guess, I was a total fan of this book. It?s one of those rare YA novels that doesn?t center around a love interest and still holds the audience?s attention. There is a minor love interest but it?s mainly there to set up for the next book. But can I just say, isn?t this a creative idea? A world were everyone has two souls, but one has to disappear for the other to thrive. For those fans of The Host, this one?s for you. There may be a lack of aliens and a love triangle, but the basic idea is there. Two people are as close as sisters (or in this case, actually are sisters) but the world outside doesn?t approve. Sister relationships, corrupt government (really, what kind of dystopia doesn?t have a corrupt government?), and friendships are important themes in this alternate United States.I think Zhang did a great job of world building without bogging down the action. With this type of book ? where the world and culture are entirely different ? there can be a background information overload, but Zhang added bits and pieces throughout the novel, while still keeping the plot moving.Every character in this book is complex and has their own troubles brewing beneath the surface. Addie is the dominant soul in the body, and while she may seem like the strongest for holding control, I think Eva is really the one who shines brightest. She has to sit in the background while Addie controls their body and deal with any of the emotions Addie deals with as her own. Eva perseveres when Addie is ready to give up. But Addie has to act like a normal person while talking to another soul at the same time. Both girls are strong willed, making them great main characters.Although there is a cliffhanger, I believe that?s its bearable enough to read before the next one comes out. There are several strings that still need to be cut, but the main arc is concluded and the characters are relatively safe. There could have been more suspense for the next book at least, but hey, at least there is a next book! Notable Scene: ?This is the way it?s supposed to be,? Addie said. ?It is just me. I?m Addie. I settled. It?s okay now. I??But Lissa?s eyes were suddenly blazing, her cheeks flushed. ?How can you say that, Addie? How can you say that when Eva?s still in there??Addie started to cry. Tears ran into our mouth, salty, warn, metallic. I whispered. Everything spun in confusion. ?What about Eva?? Lissa?s voice was shrill. ?What about Eva??Misery. Misery and pain and guilt. None of them were mine. Addie?s emotions sliced into me. No matter what happened, what we said or did to each other, Addie and I were still two parts of a whole. Closer than close. Tighter than tight. Her misery was mine. I said. But Addie kept crying and Lissa kept shouting and the room packed to the brim with tears and anger and guilt and fear.Then the world gave out.FTC Advisory: HarperCollins provided me with a copy of What?s Left of Me. No goody bags, sponsorships, ?material connections,? or bribes were exchanged for my review.