Enjoy this title right now, plus millions more, with a free trial

Only $9.99/month after trial. Cancel anytime.

The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism

The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism

Written by Naomi Klein

Narrated by Jennifer Wiltsie


The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism

Written by Naomi Klein

Narrated by Jennifer Wiltsie

ratings:
4.5/5 (160 ratings)
Length:
9 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Sep 18, 2007
ISBN:
9781427200891
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Editor's Note

Provocative & sobering…

One of the most provocative, sobering, and controversial looks at who profits and how in the wake of disasters both natural and man-made. Klein tackles the destructiveness of capitalism with biting clarity.

Description

In her ground-breaking reporting Naomi Klein introduced the term "disaster capitalism." Whether covering Baghdad after the U.S. occupation, Sri Lanka in the wake of the tsunami, or New Orleans post-Katrina, she witnessed something remarkably similar. People still reeling from catastrophe were being hit again, this time with economic "shock treatment", losing their land and homes to rapid-fire corporate makeovers.

The Shock Doctrine retells the story of the most dominant ideology of our time, Milton Friedman's free market economic revolution. In contrast to the popular myth of this movement's peaceful global victory, Klein shows how it has exploited moments of shock and extreme violence in order to implement its economic policies in so many parts of the world from Latin America and Eastern Europe to South Africa, Russia and Iraq.

At the core of disaster capitalism is the use of cataclysmic events to advance radical privatization combined with the privatization of the disaster response itself. Klein argues that by capitalizing on crises, created by nature or war, the disaster capitalism complex now exists as a booming new economy, and is the violent culmination of a radical economic project that has been incubating for fifty years.

A Macmillan Audio production.

Publisher:
Released:
Sep 18, 2007
ISBN:
9781427200891
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Naomi Klein is the award-winning author of the acclaimed international bestsellers The Shock Doctrine, No Logo, This Changes Everything, and No Is Not Enough. She is a contributing editor for Harper’s, a reporter for Rolling Stone, and writes a regular, internationally syndicated column. She has won the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism. In September 2018, she was named the inaugural Gloria Steinem Chair for Media, Culture and Feminist Studies at Rutgers University.



Reviews

What people think about The Shock Doctrine

4.6
160 ratings / 69 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    In the light of Christchurch's recent devastating earthquakes, and ensuing changes to our school and education policies, I was excited to read in the first chapter about "Disaster Capitalism" being a well established method of pushing through unpopular economic reform. The economic reform is generally comprised of three things: privatisation, government spending cuts and deregulation (free-trade). And the disaster, although in our case was a natural one, can be in the form of war, civil unrest, the bottoming out of an economy- all of which can be manufactured, btw.This book looks in depth at the situations we have all heard of in various countries over the last 40 years. Chile in the 1970s when popular socialist leader Allende was overthrown by US backed General Pinochet is heralded as the first "experiment" in using shock tactics to bring in free-trade. It was also one of the most harsh on the general population. People were "shocked" into submission by violence, torture, imprisonment, and by being "disappeared" if they displayed so much as a skerrick of left-wing ideals. With the public silenced, the economy was transformed into what would eventually leave a few multi-nationals very very rich, and Chileans without government/military connections, very very poor.It is very difficult not to cast America as the bad guy here. The IMF and the World Bank both had policies to make loans dependent on the implementation of the three aspects discussed above- known collectively as the Washington Consensus. They stepped in when countries were in crisis, and then had them by the balls for the foreseeable future. The IMF and World Bank were (and are?) populated by proponents of the Chicago School of Economics thinking. Right-wing free-trade-at-any-cost economists. These guys hold tight to the idea that without any government controls, economies not only flourish, but have unlimited growth (personally I have huge problems with this theory, not the least of which is the fact the unlimited growth is impossible based on the fact that there is a limit to natural resources).The book goes on to discuss Argentina, Russia's transformation from communist state to extreme capitalist zone, Britain under Thatcher, Poland, China's opening up, South Africa, Sri Lanka post tsunami, Iraq war and Israel in great detail and providing a side of the story that you would never have read about in the papers. The lengths that were gone to to implement economic reform are incredible. The level of crony-ism and back room deals played out between politicians and US policy advisors, the IMF and business leaders is astounding.This book reads like a thriller, one in which you cannot wait for the good guys to come in and rescue the masses. The idealist in me thinks the good guys are coming, but the realist in me knows that where there is multi-millions to be made, the greedy will not stop at any cost to feather their own nests.
  • (5/5)
    Absolutely fascinating. You must read this book.
  • (5/5)
    life changing
    this book os a wakeup call to evrryone
  • (4/5)
    Disturbing, frustrating, enlightening, hope, no hope, and on and on. Naomi opens your eyes to so much greed and evil then gives you a sliver of hope at the end. The book left me wanting more, an update with the latest ongoings around the globe, but now with eyes wide open one can guess what is really going on and do I really need it in writing to see it. Probably not. Read this shortly after reading Piketty's Capital in the 21st Century. Piketty provides the statistics that backs Klein's story, though I'm sure that wasn't Piketty's intention.
  • (3/5)
    Although some of her takes on recent geo-political movements seem forced, if even only 20% of her assertions are true, it is appalling how the West has (dis)served the two-thirds world. Challenging.
  • (4/5)
    Naomi Klein won a special place in my mind with her "No Logo" book. Ever since I read it, I haven't worn a single item of clothing with an identifiable brand. I know that's kind of like saying all I got from "Atlas Shrugged" was the phrase 'Who is John Galt?', but bear with me.

    The author dives into the recent past and explores the common thread of how disaster always seems to bring about some lasting change that benefits everyone except those affected by the disaster itself, and these changes end up being more painful than the disaster itself. Klein calls it "disaster capitalism", names Milton Friedman and electroshock therapy as the parents and Augusto Pinochet as the midwife. She then follows the beast's trail through Chile, Argentina, South Africa, Poland, Russia, Indonesia, Mexico and Iraq, finally coming home to roost in inundated New Orleans.

    Whether the beast itself is a man-made engine of purposeful destruction or a nameless faceless sum of ineffable market forces and serendipity is open to debate. Klein argues the former position, and does it quite well, naming names and putting dates and places on the worst excesses of vulture capitalism of the late 20th century. Still, the argument looks threadbare at times, the connections tenuous and the conclusions facile. There is certainly some writing on the wall, but it will probably remain to others to decide if "The Shock Doctrine" contains the whole text or only the most menacing letters.