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Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't
Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't
Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't
Audiobook9 hours

Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't

Written by Jim Collins

Narrated by Jim Collins

Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars

4.5/5

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About this audiobook

Built To Last, the defining management study of the nineties, showed how great companies triumph over time and how long-term sustained performance can be engineered into the DNA of an enterprise from the very beginning. 

But what about companies that are not born with great DNA? How can good companies, mediocre companies, even bad companies achieve enduring greatness? Are there those that convert long-term mediocrity or worse into long-term superiority? If so, what are the distinguishing characteristics that cause a company to go from good to great?

Over five years, Jim Collins and his research team have analyzed the histories of 28 companies, discovering why some companies make the leap and others don't. The findings include:

  • Level 5 Leadership: A surprising style, required for greatness.
  • The Hedgehog Concept: Finding your three circles, to transcend the curse of competence.
  • A Culture of Discipline: The alchemy of great results.
  • Technology Accelerators: How good-to-great companies think differently about technology.
  • The Flywheel and the Doom Loop: Why those who do frequent restructuring fail to make the leap.

A HarperAudio production.

LanguageEnglish
PublisherHarperAudio
Release dateJul 13, 2010
ISBN9780062045874
Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't
Author

Jim Collins

Jim Collins is a student and teacher of what makes great companies tick, and a Socratic advisor to leaders in the business and social sectors. Having invested more than a quarter-century in rigorous research, he has authored or coauthored six books that have sold in total more than 10 million copies worldwide. They include Good to Great, Built to Last, How the Mighty Fall, and Great by Choice. Driven by a relentless curiosity, Jim began his research and teaching career on the faculty at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, where he received the Distinguished Teaching Award in 1992. In 1995, he founded a management laboratory in Boulder, Colorado. In addition to his work in the business sector, Jim has a passion for learning and teaching in the social sectors, including education, healthcare, government, faith-based organizations, social ventures, and cause-driven nonprofits. In 2012 and 2013, he had the honor to serve a two-year appointment as the Class of 1951 Chair for the Study of Leadership at the United States Military Academy at West Point. In 2017, Forbes selected Jim as one of the 100 Greatest Living Business Minds. Jim has been an avid rock climber for more than forty years and has completed single-day ascents of El Capitan and Half Dome in Yosemite Valley. Learn more about Jim and his concepts at his website, where you’ll find articles, videos, and useful tools. jimcollins.com

Reviews for Good to Great

Rating: 4.633333333333334 out of 5 stars
4.5/5

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  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    I enjoyed Good to Great as part of our book club at work. I appreciate that the findings were based on data and research, and not anecdotes and poorly remembered details from specific business personalities. I would love to see an updated version twenty years later with how the internet has transformed things, but the book did mention how great companies use technology smartly and not rely on it completely.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Even though this book is over 10 years old, the concepts are still relevant and provide guidance on how to manage effectively for the long haul. Following the principles can assist with getting better employee engagement and formulating a business strategy designed for success. It's important to note that many of these concepts will take some effort and that there are no "silver bullets" that can suddenly turn a failing company into a great one, however the author does a great job of explaining the principal differences between the companies that took off (what he refers to as the "fly wheel") and those who remained stagnant or died.I did some additional research and while the majority of the companies on the "good to great" list are no longer "great" - I found that many of these companies made changes that deviated from the principles outlined in the book. Would these companies have declined if they hadn't made those changes? We'll never know for certain, since the research is merely inductive and there is no way to prove causation. I do know this is a wonderful book for mentoring new managers and getting them on course to be excellent leaders.
  • Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
    3/5
    I learned a bit from this book, and was impressed at the analysis that went into it. Interesting to see that two of the companies are not great anymore (as noted by others, Fannie Mae & Circuit City). Level 5 leadership is needed everywhere. I need to read this again!
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    This is the best book on leadership I have read in a while. I particularly related to the emphasis placed on the humility and reserved nature of the great company leaders described in this book. Whilst admiring the clarity with which Collins describes the key elements of companies that have made the steps up from being good to great, I did feel some of the terms used to describe these ideas were grating at times - when you have read the word hedgehog numerous times you will understand what I mean!Overall, an excellent book from which I have learnt an enormous amount,
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Interesting commonalities in some of the highest performing American companies.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Good read, interesting if you are starting out in business to make a great company, this book would help you make better decision to make a better company. Funny that some of these companies are no longer in existence.