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John Ransom's Andersonville Diary
John Ransom's Andersonville Diary
John Ransom's Andersonville Diary
Audiobook8 hours

John Ransom's Andersonville Diary

Written by John Ransom

Narrated by David Thorn

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

4/5

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About this audiobook

An extraordinary day-to-day documentary of the Civil War's most infamous Confederate prison, Camp Sumter, better known as Andersonville. Where 13,000 wretched Union prisoners died within barely 14 months, under conditions which bear witness to man's inhumanity to man. And, one man's undaunted spirit to survive, to tell the dreadful tale! The diary mirrors Ransom's changing attitudes from the moody early staccato sentences when he is first captured to the resigned and eventually cheerful prose when the war draws to a close.

This book is an extraordinary day-to-day documentary of the Civil War’s most infamous Confederate prison, Camp Sumter, better known as Andersonville. Here 13,000 wretched Union prisoners died within barely fourteen months, from starvation, scurvy, and other diseases that spread through the camp. There was little shelter but makeshift tents; little in the way of blankets, warm clothing, or even shoes; and a scarcity of food and fresh water. Often they were forced to sleep on the muddy ground in very crowded conditions.

While the deplorable conditions bear witness to man’s inhumanity to man, they also are witness to one man’s undaunted spirit to survive to tell the dreadful tale.
LanguageEnglish
Release dateJan 1, 2004
ISBN9780975566367
John Ransom's Andersonville Diary

Reviews for John Ransom's Andersonville Diary

Rating: 4.111111111111111 out of 5 stars
4/5

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  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    Excellent writing, a must read/listen for anyone interested in the Civil War.
  • Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
    5/5
    I've read or listened to this book more than half a dozen times. My uncle spent 35 years doing our genealogy. He loaned it to me for my first read, after revealing an ancestor in my family, our family, was imprisoned in Andersonville shortly after John Ransom began his diary. Unfortunately, he died days before prisoners were emancipated. This diary is engaging, educational at times, reflecting the anger, sadness & fear of the author. It's a must-read for anyone with interest in our Civil War and, sadly, in the inhumanity only man can place upon other men. I liked the book so much, I've sought out diaries written during other wars and significant times.

    1 person found this helpful

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    Generally I like to share my own particular thoughts on a work. However, the previous reviewer (in my opinion) has presented an outstanding, and accurate, summation of this work. Highly recommended for its compelling historical content and user friendly writing style.
  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    It's difficult to critique someone's diary -- especially when that someone survived the hell-hole that was the Andersonville POW camp during the Civil War. I think for most anyone who is at all familiar with the Civil War, the name Andersonville brings to mind the most horrific of conditions, thousands dead, survivors who came out looking like skeletons. John Ransom's diary recounts the day-to-day events of a union soldier taken POW and eventually sent to that most infamous of Confederate prison camps. It is sometimes repetitious because life was repetitious -- day after day, scrounging for food, fighting off the "raiders" -- fellow prisoners who were as brutal as their captors -- dealing with the grossest of unsanitary conditions, starvation, disease, cruelty, death. (So many dead!)I must say that I can hardly believe Ransom survived it all, and I get the feeling he's surprised, too. I'm impressed that he had the tenacity to keep up the writing through all his trials -- trading food for pencils and notebooks to write, entrusting filled notebooks to fellow prisoners when he was too incapacitated to carry them all. Ransom had a great eye and ear for detail, and somehow managed to maintain some semblance of humor through much, if not most, of the horror he endured. His diary is a fascinating account of survival with honor. Recommended.

    1 person found this helpful

  • Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
    4/5
    A moving, first person account of what Andersonville prison life was like. Would be a great book for high school students studying the Civil War.

    1 person found this helpful