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The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris

The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris

Written by David McCullough

Narrated by Edward Herrmann


The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris

Written by David McCullough

Narrated by Edward Herrmann

ratings:
4/5 (50 ratings)
Length:
16 hours
Released:
May 24, 2011
ISBN:
9781442344198
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Now in paperback, the New York Times bestseller from two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning author David McCullough-the inspiring, enthralling story of the American painters, writers, sculptors, and doctors who journeyed to Paris between 1830 and 1900.


A Special Audio Presentation of Unabridged Selections

Personally Chosen by David McCullough

The Greater Journey
is the enthralling, inspiring-and until now, untold-story of the adventurous
American artists, writers, doctors, politicians, architects, and others of high aspiration who set off for Paris in
the years between 1830 and 1900, ambitious to excel in their work. Most had never left home, never experienced a different culture. None had any guarantee of success. That they achieved so much for themselves and their country profoundly altered American history. As David McCullough writes, "Not all pioneers went west."

Writer Emma Willard, who founded the first women's college in America, was one of the intrepid bunch.
Another was Charles Sumner, who enrolled at the Sorbonne where he saw black students with the same ambition he had, and when he returned home, he would become the most powerful, unyielding voice for abolition in the U.S. Senate. James Fenimore Cooper and Samuel F. B. Morse worked unrelentingly every day in Paris, Cooper writing and Morse painting what would be his masterpiece. From something he saw in France, Morse would also bring home his momentous idea for the telegraph. Writers Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mark Twain, and Henry James were all "discovering" Paris, marveling at the treasures in the Louvre, or out with the Sunday throngs strolling the city's boulevards and gardens. "At last I have come into a dreamland," wrote Harriet Beecher Stowe, seeking escape from the notoriety Uncle Tom's Cabin had brought her. The genius of sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens and painter George Healy would flourish in Paris, inspired by the examples of brillant French masters, and by Paris itself.

For this special audio presentation, McCullough has chosen a selection of portraits, excerpted in their
entirety, that bring us into the lives of these remarkable men and women. A sweeping, fascinating story
told with power and intimacy, The Greater Journey is itself a masterpiece.


Released:
May 24, 2011
ISBN:
9781442344198
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

David McCullough has twice received the Pulitzer Prize, for Truman and John Adams, and twice received the National Book Award, for The Path Between the Seas and Mornings on Horseback. His other acclaimed books include The Johnstown Flood, The Great Bridge, Brave Companions, 1776, The Greater Journey, The American Spirit, and The Wright Brothers. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award. Visit DavidMcCullough.com.


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What people think about The Greater Journey

4.0
50 ratings / 44 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    I love David McCullough. You can feel his passion for history when reading his works. This book looks at the American presence in Paris during the 19th century. It focuses on the artists, writers, and a cast characters from inventors, to musicians, to politicians. As background, the history of Paris throughout the 19th century is discussed, but the focus always returned to the Americans living there. I think the reason this book is not rated higher by most people (myself included) is that it looks at too many people over too great a time span. It is difficult to follow at times as many of the people discussed are not well known. Another issue is that for someone not used to reading about art history, is it not easy to follow the discussions on art technique and why some art was more appreciated than others. I feel like I learned a lot and would recommend it to people who either love McCullough or this type of history.
  • (2/5)
    Easy to digest, bland history. No firecrackers tossed. No bombs thrown. Just earnest, unsophisticated Americans in Paris in the 1800s. No dancing. Some fooling around. Medical School. Art School. Just hanging. And the French were friendly back then--so says McCullough.
  • (4/5)
    Loving McCullough's writings, loving Paris, The Greater Journey was a natural fit for me to read. Unlike many of his other works, however, because there was such a variety of characters and the span of 100 years, the intensity of the story lacks, which doesn't make it any less worthwhile. Reading about all the famous Americans who made their home in Paris for a short of long while, studying art and medicine, made me delve deeper into their stories and works of art created such as The Farragut by Augustus Saint-Gaudens or the impressionist works of Mary Cassatt. Ah, Paris, truly magnificent always.
  • (5/5)
    Great to listen to on walks. Beginning in the early mid-1800's, many American artists, authors, and physicians went to Paris to study. Famous names included: James Fennimore Cooper, Samuel Morse, John Sargent, Mary Cassett, Oliver Wendall Holmes among others. One interesting person was the ambassador to France, Elihu Washburn.
  • (5/5)
    An account of the Americans who went to Paris, France to further their careers in medicine, literature, sculpture and painting during the period 1830-1900. I particularly enjoyed the stories about: Mary Cassatt, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, John Singer Sargent, Samuel F.B. Morse and Elihu B. Washburne.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent work whose only flaw is it begins rather slowly, but it builds momentum especially when it gets to the siege of Paris and the Commune. It could become one of my favorite books on this era and genre next to the account of the history of Americans in Italy in the 19th century.
  • (3/5)
    I held off listening to The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris by David McCullough because is 16 CD long. Last night, I played the last one. I think that the theme was too broad a subject. There were definitely parts that I enjoyed but there were others that seemed too long for my attention span. I already knew about the Americans going abroad in the 19th century. My great grandfather traveled to Great Britain and Paris in the 1890s with a group of artist friends. The author starts with the travelers in the 1820s, why they went to Paris, what they found and their reactions to it.I loved the parts about medicine, especially about Elizabeth Blackwell but felt that there was too much detail about Samuel Morse. Also I appreciated learning what happened to Paris after Napoleon's demise. Those details make me want to read more about the history of that period. However there seems to be too many little stories about people and sometimes it seems that he got stuck on a subject. I am glad that I listened to it but found it a little disappointing.
  • (4/5)
    McCullough...always well researched, always well written, always so interesting...
  • (2/5)
    Not one of his better reads...dragged me through the pages...love the subject..the lost generation is one of my fave eras...
  • (4/5)
    When I think of American intellectuals in Paris, I think of writers like Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein between the world wars. Yet the appeal of Paris to intelligent, creative Americans began long before that, as David McCullough tells us in his 2011 book "The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris." He might have gone back to the likes of Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin in the 18th century, but instead McCullough focuses on the period from the late 1830s to about 1900 when Americans in large numbers flocked to Paris, some remaining for years.These Americans included writers such as James Fenimore Cooper, who wrote some of his best novels in Paris, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Henry James, but they also included many who traveled to Paris to study art (John Singer Sargent, Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Mary Cassatt among them) or medicine (such as Elizabeth Blackwell, America's first female doctor, and Mason Warren). A few went to Paris to study one thing, then became famous for doing something else. Samuel F.B. Morse was there to study art, then invented the telegraph. Oliver Wendell Holmes went to Paris as a medical student but made his reputation in literature.A few notable Americans in Paris didn't quite fit the usual mold. These included such people as P.T. Barnum, Tom Thumb, White Cloud and Buffalo Bill Cody.McCullough's book proves to be something of a who's who of important Americans of the 19th century, yet at the same time it becomes a history of 19th century Paris from the perspective of those American visitors. These were trying times for Parisians, with a siege by a Prussian army, the brutal Paris Commune and Louis Napoleon's coup d'etat. Americans were there to witness it all, as well as the world's fairs and the construction of the Eiffel Tower.McCullough writes readable history, which is why his books become bestsellers. I'm never disappointed with his books, and "The Greater Journey certainly does not disappoint."
  • (4/5)
    The author describes how 19th century Americans went to Paris to seek culture and an education. As usual anything he writes is easy to read. This was an interesting cast of characters from Oliver Wendell Homes to the artist Sargent.
  • (4/5)
    We all love Paris, right, even though it's filled with French people? (I suspect many French might say something similar in connection with the U.S.). Our country's history is so intertwined with Paris and France - e.g. the critical help of the French in the American Revolution, and Americans like Jefferson and Franklin and Paine all deeply affected by their time there. Later, in the days of Hemingway's Movable Feast, U.S. authors like Fitzgerald and Gertrude Stein flourished in its artist-friendly climate. But what about the time in between?David McCullough gives us the vibrant answer in his extensively researched The Greater Journey. Beginning in 1830, he tells the story of the many 19th century American artists and authors who we may not associate with Paris, but who studied and produced great works there, or returned home to do so based on what they learned. I had known, for example, that there was a connection with Paris for James Fenimore Cooper, and that he was revered there, but didn't have any feel for the extent of it until reading this book. Balzac said of Cooper that "in his hands the art of the pen has never come closer to the art of the brush". Really? That guy who wrote about Hawkeye and Chingachgook?We follow the painter Samuel Morse, a depressed widower who labors for months to depict a great hallway of paintings in his most famous painting, "The Gallery of the Louvre" Does his name sound familiar? Yes, that's "the Morse code guy". Noticing a semaphore system of communication in France, he became determined to create an electronic version.Mary Cassatt, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Thoreau, and many others, make their appearances, making the long journey across the ocean by boat. McCullough managed to get me quite interested in the sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens, the son of a shoemaker who ended up creating famous public sculptures, many commemorating the Civil War. The period detail McCullough supplies often is eye-opening. We can laugh now about the widely shared belief that the barbaric industrial Eiffel Tower, in the process of completion, would be the ruin of Paris, but it was the end of the world for some Parisians of the time.I was particularly struck by the section on the many American medical students who came to study in Paris because its doctors were so far ahead of the rest of the world. The idea of studying cadavers was routine in Paris but unpracticed in the U.S. American students could watch France's finest surgeons operate, and follow its doctors on their rounds, and then take back what they learned to the needy U.S. As reported by McCullough, some of those French doctors were ridiculously full of themselves and peremptory, starting a tradition we see in this country to this day. (OK, that's my gloss, not McCullough's).McCullough effectively puts us in the middle of climactic events, including the 1870-71 siege of Paris by the Germans (with the stupidity leading to it artfully explained). The level of deprivation is heartbreaking. Due to superior dining value, cats sold for much more than dogs, and rats were reported to taste much like birds - "the flavor of a brewery rat surpassed that of the sewer rat, due to its diet."I was glad to see the (to me) still under-appreciated John Singer Sargent get his due here, as his youthful genius and wide-ranging skills garner him appreciation on both sides of the Atlantic. The struggles to make ends meet for many of these Americans help underscore the wonder of their accomplishments. Paris was favored in part because a decent life was simply cheaper there. Many thanks to Anne (NarratorLady) for recommending this one. It's an entertaining and informative read for anyone interested in this time and place, and the Americans who journeyed there.
  • (5/5)
    David McCullough writes history better than anybody else, doing a remarkable job of bringing to life people from the past. In THE GREATER JOURNEY, McCullough shows the waves of American artists, doctors, authors, architects and future politicians who went to Paris in the 1800's to experience the wonder of this great city.

    If one wanted an education in art, medicine, architecture or most anything else in the 1800's, Paris was the place to be. Not only did many Americans go there, but also many to-be famous British, Italian and German scholars.

    McCullough brings 19th century Paris to life in a way that thrilled me, page after page, story after story, character after character, location after location. McCullough's book is so inspiring that part of me wishes that I could have been part of that American wave to Paris back in a day when it ws perhaps easier to focus on one's primary ambition.

    If you love history, do yourself a favor and read this book
  • (4/5)
    44. The Greater Journey: Americans in Paris (Audio Book) by David G. McCullough, narrated by Edward Herrmann & David G. McCullough (2011, 861 pages in paper format, listened to Sep 13-29)This was coup for audio books for me - an 800 page book I never would have touched in paper form, and yet I listened to the whole thing and I enjoyed it. I'm officially sold.McCullough seems to do everything possible to keep readers away from this book. It's enormous, the topic is not naturally interesting to the average reader, and, if that isn't off-putting, the introduction surely is, quoting a miscellaneous group of secondary persons in America history about a city in a time and place foreign to American readers in so many ways. If the CD player isn't just motoring on by itself, I don't make it past page 10. But the CD kept playing and there was traffic and so I just kept listening and suddenly this got very interesting...and it remained interesting. I don't think I could mention all the key personalities that McCullough brings to life here, but he brings them to life as soon as he focuses in on them - James Fenimore Cooper, Samuel Morse as an artist, and only later the inventor of the Morse code, Oliver Wendell Holmes as a medical student, Charles Sumner the Massachusetts abolitionist senator most famous for getting beaten by a cane on the senate floor....oops, I'm doing what the intro did. Who cares about these guys? But McCullough made them so interesting - and the artists - Augustus St. Gaudens, John Singer Sargent, Mary Cassat, Winslow Homer and then some. A history of Paris through American eyes, what the reader gets is an oblique history of a most entertaining kind of both Paris and the United States. You see everything from 1830 to 1900, but never straight up, only from over in the corner of one person's view of the Louve, or some other artists studio, or whatnot. The accidental highlight is the America medical students. They come to Paris in the 1830's, and, like so many of these Americans, they find inspiration to work and work hard. They pick out and hover around the best French medical teachers, who are not necessary the most famous physicians, and they excelled, inspiring their teachers, and they brought it all back to America. By the 1870's American medical students had stopped coming to Paris, there was no need. This was both an inspiring and moving section. So recommended. And, consider audio.
  • (4/5)
    Not my favorite McCullough by a long shot, but very informative in spots. With a backdrop of 19th century Paris, McCullough provides biographies of some of the Americans whose lives were altered by their time there. I had a very rudimentary understanding of 19th century French history, so the backdrop was important to me. Some of the biographies, of Samuel Morse, Elihu Washburne, and James Fenimore Cooper, were very interesting too. The later chapters, dealing over-long with Mary Cassatt and August Saint-Gaudens, bored me.
  • (5/5)
    This book tells the story of the ex-patriot community in Paris from 1830-1900. In the process, it also gives a pretty good picture of Parisian history, of the Louvre and its aspiring artists, of the medical community and its practices, even a bit of its political history with the Second Empire and Napoleon III. Betcha didn't know that the Empress was smuggled out of France safely by an American! There are lots of interesting tidbits of well-known people-- and lesser known people. Fascinating.The only negative I would really throw at it is that there are so many characters especially in the first few chapters. I thought there would be more American history, but McCullough mostly recounted the time each character spent in Paris. Once someone went back to the US, then the narrative picked up with the next wave of ex-patriots. Recommended.Each third of the book grows better and better! I'd probably give the first part of the book a 4 star rating, but the end was definitely a 5 star rating. The amazing story of the American ambassador during the Siege of Paris, the horrors of the Paris Commune, the remarkable genius of Saint-Gaudens, Mary Cassatt and John Singer Sargent top the rest of the book.So apparently, the American ambassador, Elihu Washburne, kept a diary during the siege, but the diary was split up at the Library of Congress, copied, and interspersed with his other correspondence. Then a researcher for McCullough discovered the diary pieces and found out the family had a bound copy of the entire diary! The story of Ambassador Wasburne is fascinating, and according to the blurb on the back of the book, his diary account is published for the first time.Pretty cool. You have to be a history geek to really get excited about a dense book, but I found this book to have a refreshingly different angle. It's not often that an author wants to tell the history of an expatriot community.
  • (5/5)
    I can't imagine a better combination than history written by David McCullough and read to me by Ed Hermann. This fairly long work has been going in my car since last year, and I came to the end of it yesterday. It was fascinating. It covers the Parisian adventures of several Americans who visited that great city from the 1830's into the early years of the 20th century to study art, medicine, architecture, to serve their country, or just to absorb the culture. Most of the names are familiar--James Fenimore Cooper, John Singer Sargent, Henry James, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Mary Cassat, Augustus St. Gaudens and many more. One I had not known much about, a remarkable player in French affairs, was Elihu Washburne, a former US Congressman and ally of Presidents Lincoln and Grant who served as minister to France during the Franco-Prussian war, and set an example for diplomats and humanitarians that a few more people ought to be following these days. (End of editorial.) McCullough not only tells us about what these people saw and learned in Paris, he gives us mini-biographies of them, an overview of their work and a lot of French history. I loved it all. Highly recommended.January 2016
  • (1/5)
    TBC 1/13 read. Ho-hum. To me, it reads like a college textbook. Here's the dates, here's the players - oh look, here's a quote to interrupt the writing pattern, settle in - oh look, another quote. Couldn't finish it. The Devil in the White City - also a history book - was hugely better written. Off to another bookcrosser, who may have an easier time reading this than I.
  • (3/5)
    Once I got used to the "drier" style (the author's personality is evident more in the subjects he chooses to focus on than in the style of his prose) of a straight forward history, I enjoyed this look at Americans in Paris from the 1830s-1900. Artists figure prominently among those McCullough foregrounds, particularly painters George P. A. Healy, Samuel F. B. Morse (inventor of the telegraph),John Singer Sargent & Mary Cassatt and sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens.
  • (4/5)
    Americas's love affair with Paris in the nineteenth century. Too many historical persons of note to just mention one or two, covers art, music, politics...a great and detailed read about this great place. We used to like each other, America and France.
  • (1/5)
    For the most part, The Greater Journey goes down easy: little chunks of research, not very arduously assembled (and mostly biographical anecdote), swimming in a light broth of narrative. It's a beach-reading sort of history, without thesis and practically without topic, a "this happened then this happened" kind of writing for which the American contact with Paris serves as more an excuse than a subject. McCullough's slavishness about the you-were-there approach leads him to some absurd distortions of perspective (you'd think Samuel F. B. Morse's painting of the Louvre gallery was some sort of landmark in American visual art), but the book never suggests that anything in it be taken too seriously so it's hard to complain too much.

    And then there's 1871 and the Commune, at which point I threw the book aside in disgust. Here McCullough turns cretinous. (Consistently he refers to "the Communards" as some kind of imposition on the beloved city of art, a sort of plague, as if they were somehow not themselves Parisian citizens.) Apparently the most important event of the Commune was the imprisonment and execution of Georges Darboy, the Archbishop of Paris; McCullough (for whom the thousands of murders committed by MacMahon after the taking of the city rate less interest than the slaughter of horses for food during the German siege of the winter before) paints it in lurid colors as an historic crime. (He pities the plumage, and forgets the dying bird.) He offers nothing even close to a basic political understanding of the events or the motivations of the main actors; the fact that the American minister, Elihu Washburn, was there and a participant is all the justification (or source, or context) he needs for his narrative. Except that his bias is so strong that even on the book's own territory, he shades off into dishonesty: no mention of the fact that Darboy had been taken as a hostage for Blanqui, held prisoner by a blindly intransigent Versailles government, and that Washburne had worked with the Communard leadership to attempt to facilitate the exchange they hoped to make.

    Suddenly, The Greater Journey looks like it actually has an historical imagination: unfortunately, it's an imagination compounded of old-style liberal anticommunism and more recent War on Terror paranoia. (Read McCullough on the Commune's mythical p?troleuses for the latter.) I had been more than willing to keep consuming pages, and in fact was looking forward to the imminent appearance of Sargent and Cassatt, artists I revere, but this foul-tasting lump in the middle of the book has ruined whatever pleasure I might have taken in the rest of it.
  • (5/5)
    The story of American artists, writes and doctors who traveled to Paris, the intellectual and artistic capital of the western world and fell in love with the city and it's people, between the years 1830 and 1900. What they learned profoundly affected American history.
  • (5/5)
    I'll preface by saying I experienced (and it is an experience) McCulloughs's work in audio.Audio presents both advantage and disadvantage.While I enjoyed Edward Hermann, for reference I'll need the book in print.The backdrop is Paris, "La Ville-Lumi?re" ("The City of Light")The Greater Journey chronicles " American artists, writers, doctors, politicians, architects, and others of high aspiration who set off for Paris in the years between 1830 and 1900".It is said:" The longer they stayed, the more they became entranced with a city full of exciting ideas, new horizons, and intriguing possibilities. "Their ventures had a transformational effect on their lives and on the America to which they would return.After risking the hazardous journey across the Atlantic,(most had never been away from home) and seeing the legacy that Paris was offering each of them, they were exhilarated, despite the fact that there was no guarantee of success."At a time when American medical education was fairly primitive, Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. and other prospective physicians studied at the Sorbonne?s vast hospitals and lecture halls?with tuition free to foreigners."Paris was at that time the medical capital of the world and the home of surgical prima donnas.There was a different doctor-patient relationship in Paris and I was also intrigued by concept of the keeper of leeches and the thought of 600 medical students gathered together, practicing surgery on a ready supply of cadavers.That is to say, there were just enough medical anecdotes to encourage me to study the period more intensively.McCullough's work was very readable and famous names continually appeared with mini biographies.To be fair, there were also deadly epidemics and bloody revolutions.It's a treasure chest of historical data and well worth reading.? ? ? ? ?
  • (3/5)
    A fine history, but unfortunately not up to McCullough's (extremely) high standards.

    McCullough is an excellent biographer, and an excellent narrative historian. However, this book, trying to cover such a broad topic as Americans in Paris in the 19th century, he seems to almost flounder. Many of the chapters are excellent, and his usual skill shines here.

    Unfortunately, some of the order and presentation of all this information seems erratic. There are lots of interesting narrative stories, and background information, and you really get a narrative feel for Paris. But again, things just seem almost thrown together.

    I'd give it 3.5 or 4 stars if possible, but I'm forced to round down. If it was any other author, it would be a guaranteed 4. Don't take it too hard, David, I still love you.
  • (4/5)
    The theme of this book as stated in the opening chapter states that of the first group of Americans to go overseas to Paris: ?Great as their journey had been by sea, a greater journey had begun . . .and from it they were to learn more, and bring back more, of infinite value to themselves and to their country than they yet knew.?McCullough focuses on the development of American culture, as artists and thinkers such as the painter Mary Cassatt, the future Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner, who studied at the Sorbonne, Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr., then a young medical student, and so many others experienced Paris in the 19th century.It was a time and pace of excitement apace in the world of ideas with the expansion of knowledge in medicine, the arts, philosophy, and Paris was a center of this activity. Americans were drawn to this center throughout the century from Samuel F. B. Morse and Nathaniel Willis, painters, to Augustus Saint Gaudens, the sculptor. Writers as diverse as James Fennimore Cooper and Henry James. In fact Henry and his brother William spent some of their youth in Paris while getting a European education. The breadth of those who participated in these journeys was incredible, especially given the dangers of ocean crossing which early in the century before the advent of steamship lines took about a month. "Paris was the medical capital of the world. Our medical training was woefully behind. And this was a chance to perfect their skills and their profession, but also to come back and teach what they had learned, which almost all of them did. And the others were pioneers in launching into careers for which there was no training available here. There were no schools of architecture. There were no schools of art. There were no museums where you could go and look at paintings. It's hard to believe that, but that's how it was. It was the cultural capital of the world." (from an interview with David McCullough on PBS) Harriet Beecher Stowe wondered what was the mysterious allure of Paris. She thought it might be the river Seine, likening it to the Ohio which she knew well. She went beyond to compare art to literature, matching authors with painters. While she questioned the value of French art when she stated ?French life has more pretty pictures and popular lithographs . . . but it produces very little of the deepest and highest style of art.?, the Americans who were beginning an new American tradition learned much from their experiences in Paris.One Frenchman who inspired many of the Americans who journeyed to Paris was the inimitable Marquis de Lafayette. His efforts in the revolutionary war and his return visit to America in 1824 when he received tremendous acclaim led several of the travelers his way on their sojourns in Paris. Primarily this book is a history of lives and ideas. McCullough's book challenges the reader to expand his notion of what education meant and what Americans gained from the French beyond their diplomatic and financial support as the United States grew into a great nation in the nineteenth century.
  • (4/5)
    Fascinating stories of both famous and less famous Americans who went to Paris to study. Many of these Americans who we know by name become fleshed out with their personal stories and idiosyncrasies are told so well by the author. Most interesting were the colonists who made the trip which was both a hardship financially and in physical comfort. The book ended abruptly with Mary Cassette.
  • (4/5)
    Not an easy read, but full of history!
  • (5/5)
    Without promoting France as a country, this book does detail the impact of Paris on American architecture, medicine, literature, and art, not to mention technology and communications.
  • (4/5)
    Very evocative of a nearly century long period in Paris (ca. 1820-1900) when American artists, medical students, writers, and others travelled to Paris to learn, live, and bring back. Absolutely fascinating. I wish the entire book had been read by David McCullough but unfortunately he only handled the first chapter. Just as well, hopefully he spent the time writing some more.
  • (5/5)
    McCollough brings history alive through the characters he writes about, the lives they live and the events they encounter during this amazing time in history. I learned so much, and enjoyed every minute. My only regret was when the book came to an end.