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Confessor

Confessor

Written by Terry Goodkind

Narrated by Sam Tsoutsouvas


Confessor

Written by Terry Goodkind

Narrated by Sam Tsoutsouvas

ratings:
4.5/5 (96 ratings)
Length:
23 hours
Released:
Nov 13, 2007
ISBN:
9781423316626
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

Descending into darkness, about to be overwhelmed by evil, those people still free are powerless to stop the coming dawn of a savage new world, while Richard faces the guilt of knowing that he must let it happen. Alone, he must bear the weight of a sin he dare not confess to the one person he loves…and has lost.

Join Richard and Kahlan in the concluding novel of one of the most remarkable and memorable journeys ever written. It started with one rule and will end with the rule of all rules, the rule unwritten, the rule unspoken since the dawn of history.

When next the sun rises, the world will be forever changed.

Released:
Nov 13, 2007
ISBN:
9781423316626
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

Goodkind was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska, where he also attended art school, one of his many interests on the way to becoming a writer. Besides a career in wildlife art, he has been a cabinet maker, violin maker, and he has done restoration work on rare and exotic artifacts from around the world. In 1983 Goodkind moved to the forested mountains he loves. There, in the woods near the ocean, he built the house where he and his wife, Jeri, live, and came at last to tell his own stories.

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Reviews

What people think about Confessor

4.3
96 ratings / 36 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    An excellent listen, I had a lot of times where I went out walking after work just to finish a good bit.
  • (5/5)
    Finally, the story moves along at a much brisker pace. If the action had been evened out a bit over some of the previous books (where not a lot happened) then this one might not have felt so hectic. True, there was a happy ending, and some of my favourite characters made an appearance, such as Gratch, the red dragon, and the mud people. However, some key characters were killed off, without much ceremony - General Tremmick of the first file... He was not mentioned at all after he was consumed by a lava-hot Beast. Not a thought was spent on him. But yes, there was a lot to get through which I was pleased with in general, All the loose ends were tied up, and there was no time for dragging out any unpleasantness that was happening to Richard or Kahlan or anybody else for that matter.
  • (3/5)
    I know I could write a lot about this book and series, but I'll keep it short. The main thing is that all books need a message, but that message doesn't need to be on every page. While reading this book I ended up skimming paragraphs or whole pages, because I had read it all before in several previous books of the series. But still the book had moments, and it was good to see it all wrapped up.
  • (2/5)
    The final book of the series sees the characters put into some of the more impossible situations. Very glad to be done with these.
  • (4/5)
    Let’s be honest, Goodkind is very long winded,repetitive and it takes a long time for the plot to move, but I’m so satisfied with the ending that I’m willing to overlook that. For those who are not big fans of philosophy, you might get irritated with the lengthy explanations, but all in all I highly recommend the series. Start to finish it was very cohesive and creative.
  • (4/5)
    Very good indeed, dream walker finally got what he deserves
  • (5/5)
    I never thought, after leaving school, that I would ever read a book in its entirety for the rest of my life.. When the legend of the seeker series ended it killed me, I attempted to read through the first book and It simply wasn’t the same., but having it read to me brought life back to this wonderful adventure for the value of life and free will., I am now finished with Richards battle against jigang and the imperial order and I am beside myself., as much as I wanted to see Richard and Kahlan together and happy, I never wanted this series to end. These books, Richard and Kahlan, Cara and her sisters of the agile, Nicci., they are simply the most beautiful things to have touched my ears. I wish I could give this a higher rating than 5 stars because it deserves to be on a shelf above all other literature. I truly believe that the world could be healed through the values inscribed in the pages of these books. Thank you Terry Goodkind. You have touched my soul with these words.
  • (2/5)
    Just an awful, nonsensical cheat of an ending.

    I like the voice actor though.
  • (1/5)
    It's finally over! I am very happy to be done with this series. Goodkind really brought the quality of SOT down with the last few books, but the Chainfire Trilogy was the absolute worst of it. There were so many contradictions and so much preaching in this that I seriously considered giving up a few times.

    So anyone who is thinking of reading this series, do yourself a favor and don't.
  • (3/5)
    Confessor is the logical conclusion to the series, it just isn’t really all that fun. There are a few good action scenes, and of course we are glad for Kahlan and Richard, but sadly, Goodkind misses the point of faith. His disdain is a big turn-off and anyone who believes that faith is part of life is unlikely ever to enjoy the story. I appreciated the opportunity to read the series, and as a teen it was in some ways motivating, but as an adult I see the fallacy of the philosophy, the recycling of the plots, and the out-of-character actions of some of the characters. Would I go back and read The Sword of Truth series again? Yes, but only out of nostalgia, not because I believe the novels are of great value.Full Review at Grasping for the Wind
  • (5/5)
    The last book in the Sword of Truth series. The two things I didn't like about the Chainfire trilogy was 1) not enough of the Kahlan that we all know and love. I understand that even without her memory, she is still the smart and intelligent woman that we have grown to love and cherish, but at the same time, it was awful to feel the isolation that she felt during this time. I'm just glad that she was finally reunited with Richard in the end. 2) Way too much philosophy in these last few books. And violence and gore. Without the magic of the Midlands, this would have turned out to be a non-fantasy book.

    Anyways, great ending to a series. It will be in my heart forever and always.
  • (2/5)
    The final book of the series sees the characters put into some of the more impossible situations. Very glad to be done with these.
  • (1/5)
    Terrible. But at least the end of the series. All these books could have been condensed into a trilogy. Terrible waste of time
  • (5/5)
    How do you conclude an eleven book epic fantasy series satisfactorily? I have no idea, but Terry Goodkind did fairly well in my opinion. When I finished this series for the first time years ago I know I was disappointed that I wouldn't hear anymore about Richard and Kahlan. Now that I know there is another book about the two, I am overjoyed to hear their new adventure. This story, this arc from book 5-11, has been concluded though. Like the previous two novels in the series, this one is particularly dark. Not for the light-hearted. The world, Goodkind’s writing style, all of it, has given me something special. This is my second reading of these eleven books and I’m sure in a few more years I will be back and reading them again. Each book has a central philosophical idea, and while Richard is very multi-talented, there is still the effect that he’s not perfect, that he’s real, just very smart. I recommend this series to everyone above the age of 16, no matter which genre you like. I’m very excited about the new book Goodkind wrote after this conclusion.
  • (4/5)
    Okay I gave this 4 stars, not because I thought it was brilliant but because I had a hard time putting it down. I thought it did a good job of wrapping up the 1000's of pages that came before it in the series. I have to say I am extremely relieved to be done with this series but I also must say that I will miss this world and these characters. I feel like I have spent a lot of time with them over the years. The Sword of Truth series was always a love/hate thing for me. It drove me crazy but I was always compelled to see what happened next.
  • (2/5)
    Once upon a time I loved this series. If you've got this far, either you still loved it, or like me at the time this book came out you were a completest. (Goodkind and LK Hamilton cured me of that with their series.) If you still loved the series thus far, I doubt this will disappoint. If you've been hanging on hoping Goodkind would somehow redeem himself, abandon hope, all ye who enter here.Take Ja'La. A game that reminds me of ulama, played in pre-Columbian Mesoamerica to the death. Yes, it's cool, and if this were the first I'd read of Richard I'd probably find the game and Richard's role in it awesome, even if too reminiscent of the film Gladiator. But Richard-fatigue set in for me after he became the master-sculptor in Faith of the Fallen. OK, master tracker, natural leader, magical genius, but c'mon! Can we say Marty-Stu? I know we can! Not even Leonardo da Vinci was this multifaceted. On the other hand, I rather did like the ending. Goodkind painted himself into an ethical and plotting corner with The Pillars of Creation and I did like the neat way Goodkind resolved that--and tied his world to ours. Someday I'm going to have to reread Wizard's First Rule though and see if It's still as awesome and enjoyable as I remember. Because I can't believe the same author produced something I found so good, only to wind up with something so annoyingly mediocre.
  • (4/5)
    A fitting conclusion to the Sword of Truth series. This volume continues the story lines laid out in Chainfire and Phantom, with the memory of Kahlan wiped out in everyone but Richard and Richard himself struggling as a captive of the Imperial Order forced to participate in deadly Ja'La matches. But despite setbacks, Richard, Kahlan, and their friends prove to have a fighting chance at survival and Terry Goodkind is able to bring their story to a satisfying conclusion.
  • (5/5)
    An interesting solution to the problem and wonderful culmination to a great series.See review of Goodkind's "Wizards First Rule" for a review of the series.
  • (5/5)
    This series kind of waxed and waned for a while, but what a strong ending. *Spoiler alert* I had no idea he would create a new world to put all the non-magic believers in. I've gotten to the point that I can guess a lot of what will happen next in fantasy writing, to the point that I sometimes want to put a book down before it ends because I already know how. I think the series should have ended here, but, we'll see with the next installment of the series. Goodkind must earn a living too I guess.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing, epic to the extreme.
  • (5/5)
    Goodkind draws his epic to a close with Confessor. (or does he? I hear rumors there is another book coming in 2011 on Richard and Kahlan.) The Order is about to swallow all. Jagang has found a way into the People's palace, Richard is a captive of the Order and playing Ja'La - against the Emporers team. Rachel is on the run, the Keep is breached, and Six is helping Jagang.Goodkind ratches things up in his last book, and does an amazing jobs of pulling all the threads back together as one, makign one wonder just how a tale of this magnatude can accomplish such a cohesive ending.
  • (2/5)
    Terrible ending to a series that ran about 6 books too far. A very sudden Star Trek type ending where its all over in the blink of an eye.
  • (5/5)
    Overall, this was a satisfactory ending to what amounted to a 14,000 page endeavor by the author.While the chapters detailing Richard's captivity could have been shortened, I suppose they were necessary to fill all of the details behind the Order's motivations and what was to come in the rest of the story.Since this was the last book in the series, it was interesting to see how the author reincorporated characters from early on in the story like the Mud People and Gregory, Scarlet's son. (Richard knew him when he was just an egg "this big.")It may sound trite, but everyone "got what they deserved" in the end -except possibly Warren and the Prelate.We discover the true purpose behind the Sword of Truth and a world is created, reflective of our own society today, where people must live without magic and hope to only succeed by making the right decisions to accept and honor life above all else.
  • (4/5)
    People complain a lot about the way Terry Goodkind is trying to force his views on certain political/philosophical subjects via his books... I'm NOT one of them! I read his books for the enjoyment I get from his characters and from the stories he tells.
    Confessor is the final book in the Sword of Truth series and Terry has written an ending worthy of the series. Without giving away any spoilers, while tying up all the loose ends he has also managed to leave the way for us to return to the world of Kahlan and Richard or to visit some of the other characteres and I, for one, wouldn't be disappointed to find a new series set in the same world appearing in the future.
  • (2/5)
    The author did a good job of pulling together the plot elements of the previous 12 books. Sometimes gruesome, sometimes silly, sometimes sappy, always readable, it reflected its predecessors. I disliked the simplistic preachiness throughout which I thought was overdone. This is after all, fantasy, so if I can accept superhuman feats of endurance, swordplay, and, of course, magic, I can accept repetitious sermonizing. The Sword of Truth series could have ended several times. It certainly could have generated many spin offs. Like Stephen King's Gunslinger series, I enjoyed the journey but was glad to see it end. Likewise, I'd consider taking a similar voyage in the future, if offered. I'll make the same offer to Robert Jordan and George R.R. Martin when they follow suit.
  • (2/5)
    The author did a good job of pulling together the plot elements of the previous 12 books. Sometimes gruesome, sometimes silly, sometimes sappy, always readable, it reflected its predecessors. I disliked the simplistic preachiness throughout which I thought was overdone. This is after all, fantasy, so if I can accept superhuman feats of endurance, swordplay, and, of course, magic, I can accept repetitious sermonizing. The Sword of Truth series could have ended several times. It certainly could have generated many spin offs. Like Stephen King's Gunslinger series, I enjoyed the journey but was glad to see it end. Likewise, I'd consider taking a similar voyage in the future, if offered. I'll make the same offer to Robert Jordan and George R.R. Martin when they follow suit.
  • (5/5)
    Overall, a pretty good book. However, I was rather unsatisfied by the way Goodkind ended the series. It felt too... I don't know, happy? It simply seems like an overly clichéd ending that is way happier than necessary and seems to solve everything.Also, [SPOILER] the fact that Richard didn't kill Jagang - no, not even that. Richard's reasoning behind not killing Jagang bothered me. I found it clichéd and unsatisfying because, quite honestly and frankly, I wanted Jagang to die. Jagang NEEDED to die. But he didn't. This sentence is here for people who did not want to be spoiled, because people, even trying not to, tend to read the last sentence of a paragraph when skipping it. You know it to be true.Oh yeah! Reading some other reviews, I remembered something I really loved about this book that really redeemed it in my eyes: Ja'La. Quite simply put, the Ja'La matches were effing awesome. I wish Goodkind had put more in there, because just everything about those matches were BA.
  • (2/5)
    It's over! It's over!!! Ring the bells! Sound the trumpets! I'm DONE!!! ...and what a finish it was. In fact, I almost feel inspired to go read the first book of the whole series again *just so I can remember why I loved these books in the first place*... and so I can remember them with a good taste in my mouth, instead of the bile that rose up during this last trilogy. Seriously. Goodkind: the end of your series is *not* the place for you to get on your soapbox and preach your own sad beliefs. Why did you feel the need to tear others down with your own unfortunate view of the world? I get the sense that Goodkind has, somewhere in his past, been terribly hurt by organized religion, and hasn't ever recovered from it. Okay, I understand, but is HERE really the place to take out your sufferings? Please. You're a good writer, but these last 3 books were:a) sloppyb) inconsistentc) repetitived) poorly edited (seriously - sometimes people say the same line twice on the page, NOT on purposes, with perhaps ONE pronoun changed. WTH.)e) unoriginal... a far, FAR cry from the first few books in the seriesIn all, I was very disappointed with this ending. My husband, who is also reading through the end trilogy right now, doesn't seem to be faring any better. When I recommend Goodkind's writing from now on, I will specifically tell people to stop reading after book 3 or 4, because that seems to be where the originality that characterized the first few ran out, and the Goodkind Preaches His Worldview aspect began to creep in. Don't get me wrong - I understand that an author's worldview probably should pervade everything they do... but in this case, talking down to your readers and giving long, soapbox diatribes is really NOT the way to present things. *sigh* I really wanted this end trilogy to be good. I did. So like I said: Wizard's First Rule, here I come. You still stand on my favorites list... and I'd like to keep it that way.
  • (3/5)
    Finally, it’s over. And how anti-climactic it was.Given the past five books or so, I wasn’t really expecting something spectacular, but I was hoping that Goodkind would make a comeback and give us something as amazing as the first book. Especially the ending. I was expecting an intense, awe-inspiring ending (after all, we have gone through ten other books to get to this point), but it fell flat. Not much emotion, not a great surprise twist at the end, just an ending.Another downside to this book is the way it’s written. Most of the story is revealed by dialogue, making it seem more like a script rather than a story. The characters speak to each other as if they have hours to have a conversation (and we know quite well that the one thing they don’t have is time). Nicci and Richard are prone to given sermon-like speeches about living life and making choices. I get that Goodkind wants to send us a message, but could he please not beat us over the head with it? Every time I turn the page, some character or other is telling another how they should have the freedom to live life.It also seemed kind of rushed. Major events happen or things happen to major characters, and they’re just kind of brushed off. There may be a line or two describing the consequences or effects, and then on to the next thing. And for as long as we have been with these characters, I think that thoroughness is necessary.I will admit that there were some really good parts that reminded me of books one and two; when Richard plays Jagang’s Ja’La team, for instance. But for the most part, I was bored.
  • (5/5)
    Well I feel like I've just lost an old friend. The Sword of Truth series has come to an end. I started my second path through the series almost a year ago and while I've read other books in between, this has been my main focus for 2008. Plowing through 11 books of 700+ pages was a daunting task at times, but well worth the time. These kind of series only come around once in a while. Those that you are truely drawn into the plot, you feel empathy for the characters and in fact kind of see them as old friends.Book 11, Confessor, wraps up the series in fine fashion. For the most part I was in the dark about how this would wrap up until the very end. Most books or series will end weakly because they try to just tie up loose ends within a certain word count, leaving the reader less than satisfied. This was the exception. Not many loose ends left over. Everything wrapped up nicely and made complete sense when looking over the entire series. While some may not like the ending for Jagang, if you look at thephilosphies that Terry was trying to portray through his story his end fit oh so well. I'm saddened yet relieved that the series is done (I don't think I will be doing any huge long series in 2009). I can't wait to see what Goodkind produces next and hope that at some point he returns to this world in a new novel / series either expanding on some back history or telling all new stories moving forward in this world. While this series is long and will take some time, I recommend it to anyone even to non-fantasy readers.