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Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions

Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions

Written by Edgar Allan Poe

Narrated by Simon Jones


Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions

Written by Edgar Allan Poe

Narrated by Simon Jones

ratings:
4.5/5 (337 ratings)
Length:
7 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 19, 2008
ISBN:
9780061629532
Format:
Audiobook

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Description

"A marvelous book… thought provoking and highly entertaining."
-Jerome Groopman, New York Times bestselling author of How Doctors Think

"Ariely not only gives us a great read; he also makes us much wiser."
-George Akerlof, 2001 Nobel Laureate in Economics

"Revolutionary."
-New York Times Book Review

Behavioral economist and New York Times bestselling author Dan Ariely offers a much-needed take on the irrational decisions that led to our current economic crisis.

Publisher:
Released:
Feb 19, 2008
ISBN:
9780061629532
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

EbookSnapshot

About the author

Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) reigned unrivaled in his mastery of mystery. Born in Boston, he was orphaned at age three, expelled from West Point for gambling and became an alcoholic. In 1836 he secretly wed his thirteen-year-old cousin. The Raven, published in 1845, made Poe famous. He died in 1849 under what remain suspicious circumstances.


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Reviews

What people think about Predictably Irrational

4.6
337 ratings / 42 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Fun and superbly interesting! It makes sense that we don’t make sense!
  • (5/5)
    i get to understand the irrational choices i make... from choice of menu to choice hpuses. this booknis truly enlightening.
  • (2/5)
    Useful facts, misguiding conclusions. Following advice in this book has potential to create a lot of problems for you.
  • (5/5)
    Adresses rational flaws in our mind for many things that we consider that we know about, but we get used to our irrationality. Including money, spending, trust, social...
  • (4/5)
    Move away from traditional "Shakespearean" economics and recognize that human behavior is susceptible to errors in judgment when taking economic decisions
  • (5/5)
    Probably one of my favorites. I strongly recommend reading/listening to this.
  • (5/5)
    got me thinking. Loads of info i will take a listen again
  • (5/5)
    As a career salesman and somebody who is also easily "sold" I find the first half of the book to be filled with bunches of practical information, and I find the last half to be mentally stimulating and fun.
  • (5/5)
    This may be the most influential book I may ever read.
  • (5/5)
    Very informative. Very interesting. I highly recommend to anyone.
  • (5/5)
    A great listen! Gets you thinking about why we do things. Humans are a funny bunch!
  • (5/5)
    What a fascinating book!

    If you consider yourself a student of behavior call mom and you haven’t already read this, this is your next book.

    As a marketing professional this was recommended to me and I am very grateful. This book offers tremendous insight on why people do what they do, even when it makes no logical explanation.
  • (5/5)
    Must read/listen for anyone who decides anything. Brilliant insight into human decision making processes and associated pitfalls
  • (5/5)
    The best part of the book is how relatable it is. I recall all that is described, happening around me
  • (4/5)
    Great Listen. Intriguing. Some chapters felt a bit repetitive, but overall, would recommend.
  • (5/5)
    Great insights! Really gets you thinking about how we act and justify our actions. We like to believe we act rationally but do we really?
  • (5/5)
    The examples he uses are clear and his language conveys his message really well
  • (5/5)
    If u think u r rational enough to make your own decision or your every decision made is based on free will, this book will open your eyes to a new perspective
  • (5/5)
    After completing this book, you will NOT think like you do now.
  • (5/5)
    Awessome, really good book, about how we do things whithout think about
  • (3/5)
    A book that makes some interesting observations about the bad choices people (repeatedly) make. Maybe because much of the material is familiar to me, but I felt like this certainly could have been condensed, although I certainly took away a few interesting tidbits. Recommended to me by a professor.
  • (5/5)
    Enlightening and entertaining.
  • (5/5)
    Fascinating and applicable to your personal life. I totally geeked out on all the findings.
  • (5/5)
    fantastic insights
  • (4/5)
    Great topics and thoughtful content, but got a little boring by the end. Good read though.
  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    The economic concept of a rational economic man is brought into question through various studies on how we make economic options to buy or sell. I do not doubt that given the complexity of our choices today that always taking the best option is highly unlikely. Yet the market does make choices ie the rise of the I Phone at the expense of Blackberry. The studies on cheating are quite eye opening and larger than expected.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    Any book that seems to predict your behaviour is both intriguing and, let's face it, a bit scary. I started this book with a measure of cynicism - everyone seems to be cashing in on the self-help style book these days. Well, I don't mind eating some humble pie - I was wrong.To start, this isn't a self-help book. It's a study of human nature. But that's not to say it doesn't offer some advice on how we can combat these 'hidden forces'. Each chapter covers an area of our 'predictable irrationality' and Ariely uses straightforward experiments to support his theories. For example, let me tell you one part of the book that applied to me.I used to pick up a coffee on the way to work two or three times a week for about £1.20. It was decent enough coffee and a nice treat. One day I passed by my local Cafe Nero. I bought a cup for £2.15. It's a bigger cup, much nicer coffee. Next time I pass I'm buy it again. Soon I'm buying it five days a week because that's become normal. I don't even think about it - it's as habitual as my three meals a day.Then I read this book and to tell the truth I felt slightly sick when I read the part of the book where Ariely describes exactly this type of scenario. I sat back and thought, "I've gone from spending £2.40 a week to £10.75". I went cold turkey and stopped my daily coffee!It's a bit of a waffly point I know but what I'm trying to highlight is that Ariely's book holds up a mirror. Think you're above irrationality? Think again. I have a friend who has now bought the book and half way through she admits to being as freaked out as me.It's well written, not too wordy, not condescending, funny in parts and I should imagine most people would be able to identify with some parts. The downside? Ariely offers some ways to rise above this 'predictable irrationality' but by the end of the book I almost felt like there was a sort of resigned 'well, we can try but we are who we are' feel. However, let's be fair, Ariely is one man and one man can only do so much.An excellent book and one I would certainly recommend but don't be surprised if it makes you look a little harder at yourself. But you never know - it might save you the £8 a week it's now saving me, so it's got to be worth it!
  • (4/5)
    This was a fascinating book along the lines of Freakonomics and a very easy read. I would highly recommend it--it makes you stop and think about why you do some of the things you do. Who knew that (behavioral) economics could be so interesting?
  • (3/5)
    Book is collection of behavioural experiments by the author. While book is definitely verbose can be easily trimmed to half, it's a easy quick read and shows certain interesting insights to human nature. Chapter on social norm, relative preference, price of zero and dishonesty are particularly good.
  • (4/5)
    Some great research and some amazing findings about how and why we react the way we do.