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The Return of Sherlock Holmes – Volume I

The Return of Sherlock Holmes – Volume I

Written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Narrated by David Timson


The Return of Sherlock Holmes – Volume I

Written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Narrated by David Timson

ratings:
4.5/5 (46 ratings)
Length:
3 hours
Released:
Feb 1, 2004
ISBN:
9789629545161
Format:
Audiobook

Description

When Sherlock Holmes met his demise in The Adventure of the Final Problem, published in 1893, the distress of the unsuspecting reading public was profound. For years fans showed no signs of letting Sherlock Holmes lie down and die. Eventually, Doyle saw fit to continue his Holmes’ canon and wrote a series of thirteen short stories – The Return of Sherlock Holmes – published in 1905. The series begins, inevitably, with the shock re-appearance of the master detective in The Adventure of the Empty House. This, plus three others are included in Naxos AudioBooks’ first volume of Doyle’s continuation of the famous bloodhound-of-a-genius, read by master storyteller David Timson. Though he has been away, it seems that Holmes has lost none of his remarkable qualities.
Released:
Feb 1, 2004
ISBN:
9789629545161
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1859. Before starting his writing career, Doyle attended medical school, where he met the professor who would later inspire his most famous creation, Sherlock Holmes. A Study in Scarlet was Doyle's first novel; he would go on to write more than sixty stories featuring Sherlock Holmes. He died in England in 1930.


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Reviews

What people think about The Return of Sherlock Holmes – Volume I

4.5
46 ratings / 10 Reviews
What did you think?
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Three years after Sherlock’s death at the hands of Moriarty, Dr. Watson is shocked to discover he’s actually alive and well! He was so shocked in fact he faints for the first and only time in his life. The story that follows explains Sherlock’s absence over the past couples years and his current predicament. Some of Moriarty’s agents are trying to find and kill him and they’ll stop at nothing to do so. The clever Holmes devises a plan to not only catch his enemies, but also to solve an open case for the police at the same time. **SPOILERS**Colonel Moran is Sherlock’s pursuer in this novella. He is an admired military man with a reputation as an skilled hunter. Sherlock compares Colonel Moran (to his face) to the very tigers he hunted for so many years. It must have been salt in the wound to someone so proud of his ability to hunt. Holmes had no qualms about insulting him and making sure he understood that he was now the captured prey. Clearly the brilliant Sherlock has returned. **SPOILERS OVER**BOTTOM LINE: An excellent story and a must read for anyone who finishes The Final Problem.  
  • (4/5)
    This is the third collection of Sherlock Holmes short stories, consisting of a baker's dozen of puzzle pieces with the Great Detective. I wouldn't recommend them as an introduction to Holmes. In the last story of the second collection, The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, "The Final Problem," Doyle famously sent Holmes over Reichenbach Falls. The introduction in the edition I read relates how a boatman told Doyle that even if Holmes survived the fall over the cliff, "he was never quite the same man afterwards." I don't know if I'd go that far, but it's true that if I had to list my favorite Holmes stories ("A Scandal in Bohemia," "The Speckled Band," "The Red-Headed League", "The Blue Carbuncle," "Silver Blaze," "The Musgrave Ritual") they all come from the first two collections. The introduction also points out that many of the stories in this collection have elements recycled from earlier stories: "The Six Napoleans" recapping aspects of "The Blue Carbuncle," "The Norwood Builder" using a trick from "A Scandal in Bohemia," "The Second Stain" is reminiscent of "The Naval Treaty" and "The Solitary Cyclist" of "The Greek Interpreter."Still, reading this was a pleasure--if not so much as brilliant puzzle pieces, than just for the company of the wry Holmes and how he plays off Watson. I had to grin when Holmes whips off his disguise in "The Empty House" and Watson faints--and then at Holmes' account at how he faked his own death--observing how all of them who came with Watson came to "totally erroneous conclusions." I was intrigued by the puzzle of the stick-figure cipher in "The Dancing Men." I'm not about to forget the death by harpoon in "The Black Peter." I had to smile at Holmes ironic humor in his comments to Inspector Lestrade at the end of "Charles Augustus Milverton." And it's a great moment in "The Six Napoleons" when Lestrade says Scotland Yard is proud of Holmes. And it was touching to see the concern of the seemingly cold, logical Holmes for Watson in "The Abbey Grange." So yes, even though I'd recommend the earlier short story collections or the first three novels (especially The Hound of the Baskervilles over The Return of Sherlock Holmes, that's not to say there isn't still a lot to enjoy here.
  • (4/5)
    Holmes has returned from Reichenbach Falls, much to the surprise of - well, everyone, considering he was thought to be dead. There are thirteen stories in this collection, short enough to be fast-paced and well-worded enough to be deeply engaging. Some of my favorite stories were the Norwood Builder (with some horror undertones; faked deaths and grotesque murders ahoy!), Charles Agustus Milverton, The Solitary Cyclist and the Second Stain. There were a few dull moments - the Adventure of the Three Students is pretty terrible, in my opinion, with a 'mystery' that is both boring and instantly solveable. But overall it is a solid collection in the Holmes canon.
  • (3/5)
    Short stories are easy to read - can pick it up and just read one story before bed - does make me take more time to read.Find I prefer the stories that are mysteries/puzzles, rather than murders - liked 'The Empty House' (& the way Holmes returned), 'The Priory School' and 'The Three Students' best.Really like the picture on the cover (one of my favourites in the series).Arthur Conan Doyle seems to like to give the stories a happy ending - even when someone is caught and has to leave the country, they planned to go anyway. ^_^
  • (5/5)
    Another fabulous novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Same characters, great new mysteries. My only problem with this book had to do with the formatting as opposed to the writing. In places, where there should have been pictures, my kindle only showed the word "graphic". It would have been nice to see the map/sketch instead of a note that there should be a picture. Other than that, brilliant!
  • (4/5)
    While all of the stories are good, the last two in the book are the best in my opinion. They feel very classically Holmes.
  • (4/5)
    The Holmes that returns from Reichenbach is a very different one to that before Final Problem. I can't remember the last time I read this but the stories don't have the same mental intensity of the earlier works. Here, Holmes deals with a different class of clientele, there is less of foggy, atmospheric London and greater reference to the colonies of the Empire. Most importantly there is less detection. Either I've gotten smarter or the stories are less painstaking in its detail - and I doubt it's the former. On resurrecting Holmes, Doyle's writing is occasionally half-hearted and dour. His reluctance may also account for the memorable but gruesome violence and the abrupt conclusions to cases. However, Return is still, in my mind, a classic.
  • (5/5)
    Sherlock Holmes is timeless! The baker's dozen of Adventures that appear in this book are: The Empty House, The Norwood Builder, The Dancing Men, The Solitary Cyclist, The Priory School, Black Peter, Charles Augustus Milverton, The Six Napoleons, The Three Students, The Golden Pince-nez, The Missing Three-quarter, The Abbey Grange, and The Second Stain.
  • (4/5)
    A better collection of short stories (Puffin has published some of these stories in a collection called 'The Great Adventures of SH'. Includes one of my favourite short stories, 'The Dancing Men' and adventure based around a writing code featuring little stick men. All very much worth a read.
  • (4/5)
    Delightful stuff, loved the librivox.org free audiobook version. Not quite as engaging as the earlier stories, but still well worth the read.