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Neverwhere

Neverwhere

Written by Neil Gaiman

Narrated by Neil Gaiman


Neverwhere

Written by Neil Gaiman

Narrated by Neil Gaiman

ratings:
4.5/5 (1,002 ratings)
Length:
13 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Oct 23, 2007
ISBN:
9780061549113
Format:
Audiobook

Description

National Bestseller

Selected as one of NPR’s Top 100 Science Fiction and Fantasy Books of All Time

The #1 New York Times bestselling author’s wildly successful first novel featuring his new Neverwhere tale, “How the Marquis Got His Coat Back.”

Richard Mayhew is a young man with a good heart and an ordinary life, which is changed forever when he stops to help a girl he finds bleeding on a London sidewalk. His small act of kindness propels him into a world he never dreamed existed. There are people who fall through the cracks, and Richard has become one of them. And he must learn to survive in this city of shadows and darkness, monsters and saints, murderers and angels, if he is ever to return to the London that he knew.

“A fantastic story that is both the stuff of dreams and nightmares” (San Diego Union-Tribune), Neil Gaiman’s first solo novel has become a touchstone of urban fantasy, and a perennial favorite of readers everywhere.

“Delightful … inventively horrific.”

USA Today

Publisher:
Released:
Oct 23, 2007
ISBN:
9780061549113
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Neil Gaiman is a #1 New York Times bestselling author of books for children and adults whose award-winning titles include Norse Mythology, American Gods, The Graveyard Book, Good Omens (with Terry Pratchett), Coraline, and The Sandman graphic novels. Neil Gaiman is a Goodwill Ambassador for UNHCR and Professor in the Arts at Bard College.



Reviews

What people think about Neverwhere

4.4
1002 ratings / 314 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Richard Mayhew is a young, successful businessman living in London. One evening, while on his way to dinner with his fiance, he spots an injured girl bleeding on the sidewalk. Refusing to continue on with his evening until the girl is looked after, Richard takes her to his apartment after her refusal to see a doctor.

    The following morning the young lady has miraculously recovered and asks Richard to seek out a man to assist her in her return home. Travelling through an area of the city he’s never known to exist dubbed “The London Below”, Richard locates and returns to the girl with the desired man in tow. Shortly after they vanish from his life, Richard begins experiencing strange occurrences. He’s fading into obscurity, his own fiance doesn’t recognize him and his apartment is on the market for new tenants.

    Determined to find the young lady, whom we have come to know as “Door”, Richard is looking for an explanation into why this is happening to him. Can Richard find his new found friend and return to his normal life?

    If I’m going to come away with anything from this novel it’s that I enjoyed it a great deal more than American Gods. I didn’t realize until after the fact that the novel was adapted from the television series of the same name. Not sure I’ve ever heard of a popular author taking that route as it’s normally the other way around.

    The interactions between the inhabitants of “London Below” and “London Above” reminded me a lot of China Mieville’s The City & The City. Obviously this book came first and I felt that Gaiman did a pretty bang on job. Nothing against Mieville but I had a much easier time reading this than I did that – then again, Mieville isn’t considered light reading by any stretch of the term.

    I loved Gaiman’s world building and the rich cast of characters he’s created for the story. As with American Gods, Gaiman excels at crafting characters with diverse backgrounds and interesting personalities – he’s certainly no slouch when it comes to that. The world of London Below captured my imagination. An ever shifting market and travelling through deep, pitch-black tunnels where one can be claimed by the darkness is downright creepy.

    The villains Croup and Vandemar were excellent and Gaiman must have had a lot of fun in writing them. Not only do they get to show their mean, terrifying side but they also got some of the biggest laughs out of me; they were consistently entertaining.

    All in all, this was a pretty important book for me. I wasn’t a fan of American Gods and was less than impressed with Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader so I was beginning to think that maybe Gaiman just wasn’t for me. However, having a much better reaction to this story has kept my interest level high when it comes to checking out what else he’s got out there.

    Cross Posted @ Every Read Thing
  • (4/5)
    This reads like the adventures of the love child of Alice in Wonderland and Arthur Dent, as transcribed by Stephen King.

    Gaiman's fantasy adventure takes place in a "London Below" as his protagonist gets sucked into a mad and dangerous quest in a magical / malevolent culture existing under the streets of London, where time is fluid, loyalties shift, and violent death is a constant possibility.

    The ending is an obvious setup for further adventures, and of course the "#1" in the subtitle is a guarantee of it. The edition I purchased did NOT have that info on the cover! I tend to stay away from series on general principal.

    I fully understand how difficult it is to create a viable and believable fantasy world -- and Gaiman has done a masterful, if creepy, job of it here. The temptation to stay and play longer in their creation is strong in fantasy writers.

    To be clear, "Neverwhere" stands well alone. It has a beginning, a middle, and an end. There's a discrete plot and story arc. The characters change and grow and learn (when they don't die -- but even that may not preclude further adventures in this universe). So series fans will be lining up for the next installment(s) of London Below. As for me, I'll probably just re-read "The Ocean at the End of the Lane".
  • (5/5)
    Richard Mayhew is drawn into the world of London Below when he helps a young girl who is lying bleeding on a London street and finds that once you leave London Above, there is no going back.This is one of the best books that I read in 2004
  • (4/5)
    An unassuming young financier helps an injured girl, is made nearly invisible, and travels to the Underside, a bizarre world underneath / entangled with the London Underground. It's an enjoyable read, but a lot of it seems recycled from every mythic journey ever. There were times when I thought the characters were meant to be references, but then I couldn't identify the reference.
  • (3/5)
    Oh Neil, what happened here? I never expected to read anything by you that didn't absolutely blow me away, but this book, while being a page-turner, and having a fantastic end and a great villain, felt sterile and soulless in comparison to all of your other work. I think a lot of that can be attributed to the shallow world-building that's at play. London-below and the characters that inhabit it were given neither enough time nor enough explanation to resonate with me, and the two lackeys of the main villain, Mr. Coop and Mr. Vandemar, just seemed so...random, and out of place. In fact, that's a perfect way to describe a lot of the stuff in this book: random and out of place. Definitely still worth a read, just don't expect it to stick with you after the fact.
  • (5/5)
    Clever and charming. Having read only a few other Gaiman offerings (Sandman, Coraline, Stardust, Good Omens), I found this story filled with unexpected moments. The audiobook was suspenseful and funny, and makes me want to go pick up another Gaiman book right away.