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Burn

Burn

Written by Nevada Barr

Narrated by Joyce Bean


Burn

Written by Nevada Barr

Narrated by Joyce Bean

ratings:
4/5 (44 ratings)
Length:
12 hours
Released:
Aug 3, 2010
ISBN:
9781441816054
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Anna Pigeon, a Ranger with the National Park Service, is on administrative leave from her job as she recovers from the traumas of the past couple of months - while the physical wounds have healed, the emotional ones are still healing. With her new husband busy and back at work, Anna decides to go to stay with an old friend from the Park Service, Geneva, who works as a singer at the New Orleans Jazz National Historic Park.

Anna isn't in town long before she crosses paths with a tenant of Geneva's, a creepy guy named Jordan. She discovers what seems to be an attempt to place a curse on her - a gruesomely killed pigeon marked with runic symbols - and begins slowly to find traces of very dark doings in the heart of post-Katrina New Orleans. Tied up in all of this evil magic are Jordan, who is not at all what he appears to be; a fugitive mother accused of killing her husband and daughters in a fire; and faint whispers of unpleasant goings-on in the heart of the slowly recovering city.

Now it will take all of Anna's skills learned in the untamed outdoors to navigate the urban jungle in which she finds herself, to uncover the threads that connect these seemingly disparate people, and to rescue the most vulnerable of creatures from the most savage of animals.
Released:
Aug 3, 2010
ISBN:
9781441816054
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Navada Barr is the award-winning author of seven Anna Pigeon mysteries: Track of the Cat, A Superior Death, Ill Wind, Firestorm, Endangered Species, Blind Descent, and Liberty Falling. She lives in Mississippi and was most recently a ranger on the Natchez Trace Parkway

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Reviews

What people think about Burn

3.8
44 ratings / 43 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    I have really enjoyed the Anna Pigeon series, and a big part of what I enjoy is the National Park setting, in particular the isolated wilderness settings. So to say that a story set in New Orleans is in a National Park is stretching it. Maybe it is "technically" true, but it is not what I expect from this series. The topic, child prostitution, is very dark, even though the book is not very explicit. It leaves a lot to the imagination.

    The beginning, with the introduction of Jordan, was interesting. The part with Clare and her family felt like a totally different book. I couldn't see how they would ever intersect. Of course, they eventually did, and it made sense. Jordan, as a person, was not a very likable character. There was a slight "voodoo" element in the story. Why? Just because it was New Orleans? It didn't add anything to the story. The ending was very unbelievable. Anna and Jordan against a well organized child prostitution ring. It seems impossible that they should triumph.

    Overall, the book was ok. Not the best in the series by far.
  • (5/5)
    All of you naysayers just don't want to accept the truth - humans are a failed species. You whiny people are the reason monsters like this get away with this type of thing - - you CHOOSE TO IGNORE THE TRUTH. This sort of thing --- IT IS YOUR FAULT FOR IGNORING IT! Nevada Barr does an EXCEPTIONAL job of telling the truth about horrors that are the horrible, devastating truth. If you can't stand it? Do something about it. Find these people. Kill them. They don't deserve to live.

    Ms Barr has taken on a horrific subject and made it real. The people that really disturb me? The blind idiots who gave the book a bad review. This is a desperately important issue, one that is ignored, denied, and swept under the rug by people who would just as soon pretend it doesn't happen. If you stick your fingers in your ears and hum really loud, it will just all go away, right? R i i i i g h t......

    I had a minister tell me once upon a time that things like this simply didn't happen - that humans were too "Godly" for this to ever happen, and that I was a monster for saying it did. Yes, and Santa comes down the chimney, the Tooth Fairy delivers quarters, and the man with the van really only wants to give your child a piece of candy - he never would really hurt a fly, right? Yes, dear morons, it happens, and No, it isn't a 'curable disability' it is a monstrous, horrific twist to the psyche that is incurable, other than with a needle in the arm or in "Old Sparky" (too good a fate) or by burning slowly at a rotisserie operated stake (much more like it).

    Thank you, thank you, Ms Barr, for writing "Burn". Yes, the reviews of many are stupid, simplistic, blind and cruel. I wonder what these same people would say if it were THEIR children who were taken and used in this manner?

    Ms Barr does an exceptional job of pulling off the cover of banality and blindness and writing a book which brings these horrors to life. To say true, I had sort of gotten bored with Anna. As she has gotten older, she has gotten stodgy and dull (sort of like the rest of us). None of her stories, in my estimation, really addressed anything truly important any longer. It was more like running around telling you about state parks and having fights. Apparently, Ms Barr was a bit bored with Anna herself, and decided to do something deeply worthwhile with her character. Hooray for her! The book is absolutely fantastic, and, hopefully, will bring attention to an issue that Americans have ignored for far too long.
    If the book opens the eyes of only a few, it will be worth the effort she put into writing a deep, intelligent, and worthwhile book.

    What if it were YOUR child?
  • (4/5)
    It's been a long time since I read this book but I have read the entire series, up until the most current book and I really like it. I love how the series is set outdoors in the different parks. If you like C.J. Box, then you'll like Barr too.
  • (1/5)
    I've always wanted to like Nevada Barr's Anna Pigeon books, but have had a hard time liking her main character. This latest novel did me in. Besides the unlikeable Anna, the prose was trying to hard--too many allegories, too much mood. I gave up and moved on to Ridley Pearson
  • (2/5)
    The only Nevada Barr book that I truly did not like. Maybe because it wasn't in a national park and she wasn't Ranger Anna? I never grew attached to Jordan/Clare and didn't find myself caring whether or not she got her children back. As someone who loves the religious undercurrent of New Orleans, I did enjoy those parts
  • (5/5)
    All of you naysayers just don't want to accept the truth - humans are a failed species. You whiny people are the reason monsters like this get away with this type of thing - - you CHOOSE TO IGNORE THE TRUTH. This sort of thing --- IT IS YOUR FAULT FOR IGNORING IT! Nevada Barr does an EXCEPTIONAL job of telling the truth about horrors that are the horrible, devastating truth. If you can't stand it? Do something about it. Find these people. Kill them. They don't deserve to live.

    Ms Barr has taken on a horrific subject and made it real. The people that really disturb me? The blind idiots who gave the book a bad review. This is a desperately important issue, one that is ignored, denied, and swept under the rug by people who would just as soon pretend it doesn't happen. If you stick your fingers in your ears and hum really loud, it will just all go away, right? R i i i i g h t......

    I had a minister tell me once upon a time that things like this simply didn't happen - that humans were too "Godly" for this to ever happen, and that I was a monster for saying it did. Yes, and Santa comes down the chimney, the Tooth Fairy delivers quarters, and the man with the van really only wants to give your child a piece of candy - he never would really hurt a fly, right? Yes, dear morons, it happens, and No, it isn't a 'curable disability' it is a monstrous, horrific twist to the psyche that is incurable, other than with a needle in the arm or in "Old Sparky" (too good a fate) or by burning slowly at a rotisserie operated stake (much more like it).

    Thank you, thank you, Ms Barr, for writing "Burn". Yes, the reviews of many are stupid, simplistic, blind and cruel. I wonder what these same people would say if it were THEIR children who were taken and used in this manner?

    Ms Barr does an exceptional job of pulling off the cover of banality and blindness and writing a book which brings these horrors to life. To say true, I had sort of gotten bored with Anna. As she has gotten older, she has gotten stodgy and dull (sort of like the rest of us). None of her stories, in my estimation, really addressed anything truly important any longer. It was more like running around telling you about state parks and having fights. Apparently, Ms Barr was a bit bored with Anna herself, and decided to do something deeply worthwhile with her character. Hooray for her! The book is absolutely fantastic, and, hopefully, will bring attention to an issue that Americans have ignored for far too long.
    If the book opens the eyes of only a few, it will be worth the effort she put into writing a deep, intelligent, and worthwhile book.

    What if it were YOUR child?
  • (4/5)
    Bring back our park ranger...this was good but too much city for me...no beautiful visuals to go with the mystery.
  • (4/5)
    Anna is in New Orleans on leave trying to recover from her last horrible case and visiting a blind friend. The two women mus break a child sex trafficking ring and catch a pedophile. Unusual for an Anna story as it's set in the city, is darker and more violent. Heartbreaking, disgusting and realistic. Anna's love life complicated and deepens her character.
  • (4/5)
    Anna Pigeon is back, and she is in New Orleans on leave from the NPS. Anna not working has been the modus operandi for the most recent two Pigeon books. However, that does not mean that Anna is idle. She involves herself with a fugitive mother from Seattle who is accused of killing her husband and two children by setting fire to their house. Child slavery and pornography figure heavily into the plot as well as all of the craziness that is New Orleans, including voodoo. While it's not a book for the squeamish, Barr has written a very suspenseful story. I had to walk away from it for awhile just to give my nervous system a rest. Then there's the matter of Anna's marriage to Paul. Are they or aren't they? Only the next book may tell.
  • (4/5)
    I started this book two or three years ago but the first 25% were so slow and boring that I just couldn't finish it. Now I gave it a second chance and after the first few chapters the story was much better. Still, I would like it to be less Jenner introspections and more action. The plot and characters were nice.
  • (4/5)
    After Jenner Redwine won the lottery her life changed. Her father ripped her off, her ex tried to sue her for a percentage of her winnings and her friends decide that she's a money sink. She moves and finds herself in the wold of the wealthy and finds a friend in the shy, kind-hearted heiress Sydney Hazlett.They decide to go on a chairty cruise when Sydney is kidnapped on shore and Jenner is kidnapped aboard. They're not sure what their kidnappers want but as time goes on Jenner finds herself attracted to hers!It's pretty predictable but I did enjoy the ride.
  • (4/5)
    Jenner wins the lottery, loses old friends, then gains a new rich friend (who turns out to be a lovely person). On their way to a hugely expensive charity cruise, Jenner's friend Sydney is kidnapped and held to ensure Jenner's cooperation with a group of people who seem to be spying on the wealthy owner of the cruise ship.Jenner falls - grumpily - for her captor, who slowly seems to be emerging as a good guy. The chemistry between the two somewhat makes up for the far-fetched plot of kidnapper-with-a-heart-old-gold...
  • (4/5)
    Winning the lottery was exciting enough. But now Jenner Redwine's hostage on a cruise ship with her good behavior the slim lifeline for her one good friend in the world. Intrigue and double-dealing on the high seas, likable main characters and a fast-paced plot make this one of Howard's better efforts of late.
  • (4/5)
    Good book. Good characters. Enjoyed it the whole thing!
  • (3/5)
    The lotto winner who needs to move on and get away from her family who keeps taking advantage of her. The cruise-ship kidnap was good and of course the rest of the romance was sweet. I don't like the violence leads to romance angle.
  • (3/5)
    Linda Howard's new hardback "Burn" is about a lottery winner who is on a charity cruise when she's coerced to cooperating with a mysterious (and, of course, gorgeous) man doing surveillance on the man in the stateroom next door. I liked the book except for the slow and choppy beginning. It starts out in present time, moves back 7 years to when the main character, Jenner, wins the lottery, and then moves forward to the time leading up to the cruise. Starting the book felt like coming into a movie half-way in. You're sort of lost and trying to figure out if you're even in the right place. Then, the chapters leading up to when Jenner wins the lottery seem sort of extraneous. I think it could all have been explained in a few pages and in a different manner that didn't slow down the pace.However, once the cruise begins the pace picks up and remains pretty steady through the rest of the book. It was a little bit disconcerting at times to read about what was happening off the ship (I had to re-read character names to realize they were talking about characters on shore), but I guess there's no help for that since it's necessary to let the reader know what was happening with other characters. Overrall, though I enjoyed Howard's new book. It had the some of the same humor she used in "To Die For" and "Mr. Perfect". And of course her heroine isn't anyone's door mat even if she's being held hostage.
  • (4/5)
    Jenner Redwine works in a factory until she wins the lottery, which totally changes her life. She begins to hobnob with the wealthy and elite, but never feels like she fits in. She has one real friend, Sydney, who talks her into going on the maiden voyage of a luxurious cruise ship for charity. Before the women board the ship, they are kidnapped. Sydney is sequestered in a hotel and kept from boarding. Jenner is held hostage in one of the staterooms and forced to pretend to have a romantic relationship with one of her captors. Things aren't always as they seem, however...it's sometimes hard to tell the difference between the bad guys and the good guys.The story starts out a little slowly, after the first couple of chapters, it really takes off. There is plenty of suspense and romance. Once started, it is hard to put down.
  • (2/5)
    Not up to Howard's usual snappy style. Takes place on a cruise ship and couldn't be more boring, and the male protagonist is given the awful name of Cael. There's a B story with the heroine's friend Syd that showed promise but was not developed. Not recommended.
  • (3/5)
    I absolutely loved the beginning of this book. The story of Jenner and how she wins the lottery and how it alters her life is compelling. It isn't until the second part of the story when Sydney is held by kidnappers that the story gets a little out of hand. With that said, this story is the perfect escape. Yes, the plot is a little far fetched and the romance is a little forced, but the characters are wonderful and the book allows your imagination to go places you 've never been before (let's hope).
  • (3/5)
    I used to so love Linda Howard, but she's really losing it. This book was phoned in, with pages of boring, non essential details. The trouble is that the basic premise was a good one on so many levels. Jenner wins the lottery, the big one, and then everything changes. She loses her friends, her family, her life. And the life she rebuilds isn't so great, despite the money. And then her one true friend is kidnapped, and will be harmed unless she plays along... Now who isn't interested in that?It wasn't that I didn’t believe Larkin, the lunatic villain, he was actually 3 dimensional by Howard's standards. It was that she gave barely any time to the relationship and romance of Cael and Jenner, and totally lacked the intensity of connection that her lovers usually have. Also, virtually no sex scenes, which are frankly usually one of Howard's major strengths.Sadly not a keeper.
  • (4/5)
    Jenner Redwine is an interesting character that grows and develops throughout the book as she moves from her life as a meat packer into the life of a millionaire after winning the lottery. After surviving the tumult created by the winning itself, and the changing attitudes of those around her, Jenner lands in the middle of a plot to sink a cruise ship. Though this is not Howard’s best novel, it is definitely entertaining and suspense filled romance.
  • (4/5)
    I've been disappointed in most of LH's more recent releases, but I was pleasantly surprised with this one. It reminded me quite a bit of All the Queen's Men. Kind of light on the romance and heavy on the storyline, but still oddly satisfying.

    I was concerned that the resolution between Jenner and Cael wouldn't be quite satisfactory, but I was pleased with the way it turned out. I felt we got to know both characters and they worked well together.

    The storyline was interesting b/c it took place almost exclusively on a cruise ship. The suspense plot didn't contain much mystery - the villain was introduced almost immediately - but it still worked. I'm sure if I thought long enough I could find plenty of holes in the story, but the truth is I was entertained enough that I didn't care.
  • (3/5)
    Cael Traylor is a super-hero: he's gorgeous, speaks lots of languages (including "Southern"), has limitless martial skills, and was trained by no less than Mossad. Nowadays, he and his team - all of whom are unusually good-looking, smart, well-heeled and fun to be around - take assignments in surveillance. Jenner Redwine is a former blue-collar worker who won one of the biggest lotteries anywhere and is now rich enough to buy a small country, but she hasn't found a place where she seems to fit. Jenner gets in Cael's way, literally - his team was supposed to be in her stateroom on a cruise, but the paranoid bad guy arranges a swap at the last minute. Cael solves this in true "Romanceland" style: her friend is kidnapped onshore, and Cael kidnaps her on the cruise. She must pretend to be in love, giving him an excuse to be in her stateroom, and there are endless situations that develop, including the feisty heroine handcuffed to the muscular hero all night.

    That said, if you are a Howard fan this book will probably be a struggle to get through in the middle of the book, but keep going. The end is good.
  • (5/5)
    This was my first Linda Howard novel and it will not be my last. This book was very entertaining. I loved Cael, he was so sexy. Very interesting story line, lots of drama and hot sex scenes. Looking forward to reading more of this author's works.
  • (4/5)
    This novel focuses on the child sex trade/slavery and was very hard for me to read due to the topic. Barr's writing seems to be getting more graphic and this one reminded me somewhat of an Andrew Vachss novel. With that said, the writing was exquisite. Barr's descriptive passages of New Orleans are truly beautiful. One passage in particular stands out as it describes the architecture of New Orleans seeming to melt into the landscape; the curving lines, the breaking of what is rigid, the fecundity ... left me with an image I won't soon forget.
  • (3/5)
    I just logged my 1100th book as read in LibraryThing, I wish it had been better. I am a big fan of Anna Pigeon, Nevada Barr's Heroine who works for the National Park service and moves from park to park in each of her adventures. However, it's hard to identify the City of New Orleans in my mind as a National Park - it's really just Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve - more an historic landmark/area than National Park, IMO and Anna isn't even working there, she's on vacation.The story centers around a woman who is hiding from the law because they suspect her of murdering her husband and children. Anna somehow becomes involved with the woman -posing as a man - who is searching for her children because she believes that they are still alive. They get immersed with child pornography rings and so it goes. Not one of Anna's best.
  • (3/5)
    National Parks Ranger Anna Pigeon is on administrative leave as she is recovering from recent traumatic events and decides to head to New Orleans where she can stay with a friend, Geneva. One of Geneva’s tenants, a creepy bloke named Jordan, appears to curse Anna using voodoo for no real reason which makes Anna very suspicious. Upon following him into the very seediest parts of post-Katrina New Orleans she becomes involved in a very grim situation involving child sex slavery.

    At the same time as these events unfold, another story is also being laid out in intervening chapters. In Seattle, after a late night run to the chemist, Clare Sullivan comes home to find that her husband, her two young daughters and their nanny are all missing from the house. After searching all over she runs next door to see if the neighbours know anything but the house explodes into flames and when they die down firefighters walk out of the wreckage with three bodies, assumed to be her husband and their children. Clare is thought to have murdered them all but goes on the run before she can be arrested.

    As you might imagine the two stories end up intertwining, though in a rather unexpected way (though it wouldn’t be so unexpected if you read most of the blurbs and other reviews which give away a fairly major plot point that I was glad I did not know when I started the book).

    Although I missed Anna being in the beautiful natural environment of one of the national parks I still enjoyed Barr’s skill at creating a sense of location, this time the city of New Orleans, which is depicted here with beauty and ugliness both and as much more than the tourist destination or news-headline the name conjures up for most. The last part of the story, which takes place inside a club catering to the most perverse sexual tastes is equally well described, if not nearly as enjoyable to immerse oneself in.

    Having two main characters whose stories are told in alternating chapters was another difference for this book from any of the others I have read. I liked the structure; particularly in the second half of the book it really added successfully to the build up of tension. I was less taken with the character of Clare, though I can appreciate that Barr was trying something new to keep a series fresh. I can’t give details about what didn’t work for me without giving away plot spoilers so I’ll just say that I didn’t find the focus on Clare’s ‘unique psychology’ particularly engaging. I also thought that it was a bit too easy for Clare to have been a theatre company actor which allowed her to have a diverse range of skills, knowledge and insight that the average suburban mother just would not have.

    Overall though the book was compelling, even when the subject matter got very tough to handle. On that score I give Barr credit for not incorporating excessive or gratuitous descriptions of horrid things happening to children, though one’s own imagination does fill in the gaps grimly enough. This is not a book for the faint-hearted but is a well-written, intelligently plotted mystery. It’s worth reading for the character of Anna alone who continues to evolve, grow, make mistakes and generally be a very credible human being. I’m looking forward to number 17.

    What about the audio book?

    I was a bit wary of this edition because it’s a different narrator than has read the previous two Anna Pigeon books to me but Joyce Bean did an excellent job and I quickly forgot that Anna used to speak with a different voice. The wide range of accents and complex dialogue must have been a stretch for any narrator but Bean sounded like a natural.

    My rating 3.5/5
  • (4/5)
    I listened to this book which I downloaded from my library's electronic site. I have read quite a few Nevada Barr books and enjoyed them because each one takes place in a different US National Park. This one, however, takes place in New Orleans which does have a small National Park in the French Quarter. I recently visited New Orleans and I started listening to this before I left. I'm glad I hadn't gotten too far into the book while I was there though. It paints a pretty scary picture of the city.Anna is visiting a friend who works for NPS in New Orleans. Her friend rents out part of her house to a young man who hangs out with the street kids during the day and works at a strip club on Bourbon Street at night. There is also another story about a woman from Seattle whose life has come apart. Her husband left her with the nanny and then her children disappear. While she is rousing the neighbours her house explodes. However the firefighters find her husband's body in bed and the bodies of her two little girls in their beds. She is about to be charged with their murder when she manages to escape.Finally these two stories come together in a tale of child prostitution and molestation that will make you wonder if anyone can be trusted. Pretty disturbing stuff. I thought New Orleans was charming but I'm sure if you scratch the surface of any city you will find all kinds of horror.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoy a good thriller, and I have enjoyed a number of Nevada Barr's previous thrillers about National Park Ranger Anna Pigeon, but I didn't enjoy this one. The National Park setting is incidental, Anna Pigeon is a secondary character, and the case in question is a particularly gruesome one - think "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo" levels of abuse, only worse.I think the law of diminishing returns might have caught up with Anna Pigeon as a character.
  • (4/5)
    Enjoyed this book. It was a page turner. Linda Howard does not disappoint in this one. Who doesn't like a main character who is rich because she won the lottery?