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Nuclear Jellyfish

Nuclear Jellyfish

Written by Tim Dorsey

Narrated by Oliver Wyman


Nuclear Jellyfish

Written by Tim Dorsey

Narrated by Oliver Wyman

ratings:
4/5 (20 ratings)
Length:
9 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Jan 27, 2009
ISBN:
9780061729782
Format:
Audiobook

Description

“Dorsey’s brilliantly, profanely funny 11th novel…zips along like P.G. Wodehouse’s best work.”
 —Richmond Times-Dispatch

 

Tim Dorsey’s outrageously zany, gleefully violent, and uproariously funny Nuclear Jellyfish marks the triumphant return of lovable, thrill-killing Florida historian and tireless civic booster Serge A. Storms. The bestselling author of Atomic Lobster, Triggerfish Twist, and Florida Roadkill, Dorsey can match Carl Hiaasen punch-for-punch when it comes to fictionally depicting Sunshine State madness—and he’s taken his rightful place alongside Christopher Moore in the pantheon of top American humorists. Nuclear Jellyfish is a veritable WMD of radioactive hilarity—as Denver’s Rocky Mountain News so aptly puts it, “It doesn’t get any better.”

Publisher:
Released:
Jan 27, 2009
ISBN:
9780061729782
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Tim Dorsey was a reporter and editor for the Tampa Tribune from 1987 to 1999, and is the author of twenty-four novels: Tropic of Stupid, Naked Came the Florida Man, No Sunscreen for the Dead, Pope of Palm Beach, Clownfish Blues, Coconut Cowboy, Shark Skin Suite, Tiger Shrimp Tango, The Riptide Ultra-Glide, When Elves Attack, Pineapple Grenade, Electric Barracuda, Gator A-Go-Go, Nuclear Jellyfish, Atomic Lobster, Hurricane Punch, The Big Bamboo, Torpedo Juice, Cadillac Beach, The Stingray Shuffle, Triggerfish Twist, Orange Crush, Hammerhead Ranch Motel, and Florida Roadkill. He lives in Florida.

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Reviews

What people think about Nuclear Jellyfish

4.1
20 ratings / 12 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (1/5)
    Maybe it's me. Clearly Dorsey has a loyal following, and that's great, go him. But I don't get it at all, and to be honest, I never finished reading it. I've started it any number of times, but never managed to get all the way through it. I'm not someone who is put off by vulgarity, normally, but this narrative repulsed me. I didn't think the characters were particularly interesting, rather I found them flat and tiresome. I found the narrative voice maddening in some places and dull in others.In desperation I asked my housemate what she thought of Dorsey's work and her response was "Read Carl Hiassen."Whatever. I doubt I'll be tackling Dorsey again.
  • (4/5)
    Picked this up at the library not quite knowing what to expect. In the end I enjoyed the ride. I appreciated Serge and Coleman by the end for the good work they did, though not necessarily in the right way. Serge the psychopath with a heart, and Coleman the stoner. Felt like Fear and Loathing combined with Pulp Fiction, with a sort of murderous A-Team approach to torture methods thrown in for good measure. I found the Florida trivia interesting, but tired of the novel killing methods by the end. The last two came so close together I got bored. However, in the grand scheme of things this proved to be a good read well written, and I turned it around in two weeks of steady going. Recommended for beach reading or people who appreciate something slightly off the wall.
  • (4/5)
    Serge A. Storms is awesome. Great crazy serial killer. And the best part of this book? The fact that most of it is actually about Serge and his crazy antics. A lot of books like this have the problem of spending too much time on the hero that saves the day. Fuck the hero. Serge is my hero.

    4/5 because Serge is awesome, but Tim Dorsey not so much. So, fuck Tim Dorsey in his dirty ass hole. Because most of his other books suck balls.
  • (3/5)
    “Coleman, there are three – and only three – kinds of people in this world: Those who don't know they are damaged and blame others; those who realize they're damaged and blame others; and then people like you and me, who wear damage like comfortable pajamas.”Serge Storms is a man on a mission. He also happens to be a serial killer. His sidekick, Coleman, wouldn't be the brightest bulb in the marquee even if he weren't always drunk or stoned or, most often, both. Story, a student and a stripper, tags along for the ride. And Mahoney is law official who has been his nemesis for years and faithfully follows his trail.Serge cannot understand why his travel advice is rejected by some of the major corporations, but he keeps rating hotels and writing his blog. Who can't use some information about the best ways to not become a murdered tourist? He offers tidbits like:Okay, if you're staying at a budget motel that has mandatory daily maid service, they have a meth lab problem.I gave this book a try because it sounds similar to Carl Hiaasen's writing, which I have enjoyed. The setting is Florida, and Serge has an endless knowledge of Florida trivia, which he shares with anyone while he is thinking up especially gruesome and creative methods of murdering the bad guys. The book, published in 2009, is the eleventh in a series of 13 (so far?) but the first I've read. Perhaps the series will get old before I finish all, but I do want to go back and start at the beginning.The book is crude and vulgar, has a bit of fairly explicit sex, some bad words, and lots of violence. And I liked it. Why? Because it is very funny, and entertaining throughout. Readers who have a sense of the absurd and aren't easily offended will enjoy it. I received a complimentary finished copy of this book from the publisher.
  • (3/5)
    Always enjoy crazy Serge but this one was hard to follow. Enjoyed it as a Playaway - the voices were very well done.
  • (5/5)
    I am now a fan of Serge A. Storms! Nuclear Jellyfish follows Serge as he and his baked pal, Coleman dispense their patented freelance law enforcement throughout Florida. Protecting the weak, helpless, and less than smart from the crooks that target them, Serge is hot on the trail of a group of thugs targeting collectible stamp and coin dealers who happen to be moonlighting as diamond couriers. Only Serge knows in his manic brain how things will end, and one thing is for sure: you want Serge to be on your side! Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the author through the GoodReads book review program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 [...] : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising." 
  • (5/5)
    Even though it started a bit slow, I really enjoyed this book in the Serge Storms series. Once again, Dorsey comes up with very creative ways for Serge to kill the bad people and to take revenge for the innocent.
  • (4/5)
    The formula is standard by now. Serge and Coleman barrel around Florida on a loosely themed tour in a vintage car. This time it's a Javelin. Serge kills deserving people using creative and varied methods. Coleman stays wasted. Predatory diamond thieves are the current targets. The interaction between Serge and Coleman is even funnier than usual in this story. The "Rock Vault" is a particularly amusing bit. Florida history "nut" Serge shares his offbeat tourist tidbits with a couple of new characters, and even his nemesis Mahoney. The strange Florida news continues to supply Tim Dorsey with plenty of material for our amusement.
  • (5/5)
    What's not to love about Serge? A serial killer with a catalogue of psychological disorders - and a good heart - who finds novel, new and interesting ways to kill bad people. Who could resist this modern-day Superman with a killer wit? Serge and sidekick Coleman take to the road again dispensing their unique form of truth, justice and the American way. You don't need to know the story. If you haven't read Dorsey you're missing the best comedic crime fiction there is. Who else writes stuff like "White pride is rotating the tyres on your house."
  • (5/5)
    I laughed out loud.That's right, you heard me. I laughed out loud. That doesn't happen often to me when reading a book. So when it does, I take notice.And I didn't just laugh once. Not by a long shot. I laughed often, chuckled repeatedly, and smiled almost the entire way through.I have a new favorite author, and his name is Tim Dorsey.Tim Dorsey has managed to create the ultimate anti-hero in Serge A. Storms, the psychotic/obsessive/compulsive/homicidal/vengeful/chaotic force of nature that travels the lovely state of Florida with his completely useless and helpless junkie alcoholic sidekick, Coleman.When we first meet Serge and Coleman in the book, they are staking out a bridge, discussing Lynyrd Skynyrd, and wearing diapers in reverence of a lunatic astronaut.This alone should make you want to start reading.Serge has decided to launch his own Travel Guide Blog to Florida, featuring handy survival tips for the Floridian Tourist, such as how to tell where the criminals are sleeping by the way the cars are parked, and how to avoid Barracuda Hookers. This quest has him criss-crossing the Sunshine state in search of the iconic landmarks littering its landscape, many of them involving Lynyrd Skynyrd.Along the way, Serge and his Incompetent Compatriot pick up a hitchhiking exotic dancer on a mission of vengeance and tuition, stumble upon a band of diamond smuggling coin collectors, and go head to head with a blood-thirsty sociopath with a horribly botched glow-in-the-dark tattoo, all the while being chased down by a suspended detective perpetual stuck in a crime fiction noir novel, and a mysterious stranger who seems to know Serge's every move better then he knows himself.Still not interested?Despite all of this, Serge manages to periodically take time out to exact twisted justice on perceived predators of the everyday civilian in a myriad of inventively gruesome ways. Combining his love of Home Depot with his distaste for con-men, hustlers, predators and all-around villains, Serge exacts a MacGyver-like ingenuity with a diabolical mean streak that guarantees a high death-toll, and amusing assortment of severed limbs, and over a million hits on YouTube.What more could you want?Tim Dorsey manages to combine the madcap with the morose, and creates a Punisher meets The Three Stooges romp through Florida that is exciting, unpredictable, and laugh-out-loud hilarious.Trust me, just read the book already. You'll thank me.
  • (3/5)
    I've read everything Tim Dorsey has published and plan to continue to do so. His riffs critiquing everything about modern culture while reminding us of what we have lost or are losing are as sharply on-target as anything producer David E. Kelley has given us, and that's saying a lot. In this outing, Serge is writing a tourism blog, although the major travel websites decline to pick up his commentary or his bills, largely because he focuses on elements such as "how not to become a murder victim" and "how not to get rolled by a hooker." Coleman is along for the ride -- more or less, if you know what I mean. Mahoney, the noir-speaking detective remains on Serge's tail throughout his madcap criss-crossing of the state of Florida. Serge also continues his serial murder habit, killing miscreants with various spare parts found at his local Home Depot and a lot of ingenuity. Serge is also into self-examination in this book, which I found to slow the story quite a bit. I like a Serge who knows just where he's headed, even if he has no idea where he's going. Coleman was also unusually perceptive while at the same time being dangerously unreliable... he's always been unreliable but I don't think Serge ever had to rely on him before. I don't expect a Serge Storms book to make sense, but I do need it to be coherent and I didn't find that in this one. Will be anxiously awaiting the next!
  • (5/5)
    Nuclear Jellyfish: A Novel - by Tim DorseyAlthough books by Mr. Dorsey have come highly recommended, and friends of mine have actually threatened me to get me to try them, I’ve been reluctant. I’ve been a firm lover of comedic Floridian author Carl Hiaasen all my life and never felt the need to try any others books about Florida. But now all I can say is that after reading “Nuclear Jellyfish” and picking myself up off the floor from laughing so hard, I had to come and give my humble opinion. Fantastic! This was like revisiting the best of my parent’s and my grandparent’s vacations [Pre-Disney Florida] without every having to take out the photo albums or the film projector. Fast paced, fast talking, fast living serial killer [but only killing people that really, really need to be killed] Serge and his always stoned side-kick Coleman, take you on a never ending car trip around a Florida only a few remember and most of us tourists will never [hopefully] get to see. While we follow Serge and Coleman across the state, we also meet a gang of hotel robbers, led by Eel or should I say ‘Jellyfish’; the clearly demented ring leader of the gang preying on coin show salesmen who are in actuality diamond couriers who have all been set up to be robbed. Eventually their paths cross and the plot thickens. And I don’t want to give away more of the story than necessary.Interesting secondary character Storm - who may not be what she seems, (it gets a little confusing for a while) and long running Agent Mahoney, the “noir” talking Detective who is determined to nab Serge are a delight.I thoroughly enjoyed this and I will be adding more of these books by Tim Dorsey to my wish list.