Enjoy this title right now, plus millions more, with a free trial

Free for 30 days, then $9.99/month. Cancel anytime.

Royal Assassin

Royal Assassin

Written by Robin Hobb

Narrated by Paul Boehmer


Royal Assassin

Written by Robin Hobb

Narrated by Paul Boehmer

ratings:
4.5/5 (223 ratings)
Length:
29 hours
Publisher:
Released:
May 24, 2010
ISBN:
9781400184354
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Young Fitz, the illegitimate son of the noble Prince Chivalry, is ignored by all royalty except the devious King Shrewd, who has had him tutored him in the dark arts of the assassin. He has barely survived his first, soul-shattering mission, and when he returns to the court, he is thrown headfirst into the tumult of royal life.

With the king near death, and Fitz's only ally off on a seemingly hopeless quest, the throne itself is threatened. Meanwhile, the treacherous Red Ship Raiders have renewed their attacks on the Six Duchies, slaughtering the inhabitants of entire seaside towns. In this time of great peril, it soon becomes clear that the fate of the kingdom may rest in Fitz's hands-and his role in its salvation may require the ultimate sacrifice.
Publisher:
Released:
May 24, 2010
ISBN:
9781400184354
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Robin Hobb is one of the world’s finest writers of epic fiction. She was born in California in 1952 but raised in Alaska. She raised her family, ran a smallholding, delivered post to her remote community, all at the same time as writing stories and novels. She succeeded on all fronts, raising four children and becoming an internationally best-selling writer. She lives in Tacoma, Washington State.


Related to Royal Assassin

Related Audiobooks


Reviews

What people think about Royal Assassin

4.5
223 ratings / 76 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    This is Book 2 of the Farseer Trilogy, meaning it’s the middle of the story and I felt that it was noticeable, which is why I gave it four stars instead of five. At times I felt that the story dragged a touch – only slightly, in a couple of places. However, this doesn’t mean the storyline is lacking or that the characters weren’t deeply woven together. In fact, I still believe firmly that a lot could be learned by studying the way the author developed the storylines of all the characters and the plot in this trilogy.Each time I thought to myself “enough, move on” it was almost as if the author had planned it exactly to happen in that way, because there was always a sudden change that would draw me deeper into the plot, grasp me firmer. And the plot for this trilogy is complex. There are twists and turns in the story that a reader could not believe possible. The ending of this book left me feeling somewhat disturbed, yet I had seen it coming but I still wasn’t prepared for it. I put the book down and couldn’t stop thinking about what had happened. Part of me wanted to reject it, yet another part of me embraced it wholeheartedly. It was the strangest feeling and testament that the story as a whole had an affect on me.A good book pulls you in and holds you firmly within the storyline. For me, this story (I’m talking about book one and two) wasn’t just words on paper; it was people and places coming alive around me. Just as the characters in the book had to make alliances and fight for survival; I felt as if I was another character struggling for survival along side them. To become so absorbed by the plot and so totally bonded with the characters tells me that the author did her job well.This book, no, this trilogy, is highly recommended.Now, after reading and enjoying the first two books, I’m expecting a lot from the third. I hope I won’t be disappointed.
  • (4/5)
    Just as good as the last one. Fitz suffers; Kettricken is awesome (and there seem to be a few more female characters in this one, generally); the bad guy twirls his mustache. A comforting read, and because the author is a woman, I don't have to worry about problematic shit. Thumbs up.
  • (5/5)
  • (5/5)
    robin why must you hurt me this way
  • (4/5)
    Royal Assassin is the second book in the Farseer Trilogy and I must say, I liked it even more than the first, even though the middle dragged a bit. Fitz is a great character and I love that we get to see him grow up and even though he's now in the depressed teenager stage, I did not mind watching him mope. What I did mind, however, was the fact the villain of this story gets to walk around and be a villain for most of this book without anyone stopping him. Everyone knows who he is and what he's doing... and no one interferes. The last third of the book turns into some sort of emotional rollercoaster and I was on the edge of my seat for the last few hours and my heart broke for Fitz for the first time. Now I'm emotionally invested, I'm afraid to pick up the third instalment.
  • (5/5)
    I am very impressed with this book. It's a bit faster paced than the first book in the trilogy, and maintains the first book's excellent characterizations and very well woven plot. I'm only putting off starting the final book until tomorrow in the hopes that I'll get something tasks done today :)
  • (5/5)
    This novel was very slow to pick up, but once it did, it was relentless. The final third of the book had me so invested I literally could not put it down and ended up reading well into the early hours just because there was no way I could stop reading until it was finished.Hobb is a skilled fantasy writer, with so much depth to her characters and plot. I am utterly amazed.It has been a minute since I have loathed an antagonist as much as I loathed Regal in this book. I was physically frustrated as the pages went on and praying for his demise with each passing chapter. It's not easy to write a character so vile while still keeping them complex and more then just an evil trope. Beyond Regal though, Hobb has created so many dynamic and interesting characters that really begin to take on shape in this second installment to the series. Kettriken, who was only in the final chapters of the first book, took on a much larger role here, and became such an important part of Ftiz' journey. I felt she was an extremely well written and interesting character, and I couldn't help but fall in love with her. I cannot wait to read on in the series, as this has the makings of being on the top of my lists in fantasy. There are so many levels to the story that still need more time to flesh out, and I am very excited move on to the next book. This series is a must read for fantasy lovers.
  • (5/5)
    Wow! This was such a great book! It was a really awesome continuation of Fitz' story. The character development in this novel was phenomenal. Fitz is definitely a complex character and I really enjoyed getting into his head and reading about how he solved problems and his thought processes. Robin Hobb does an amazing job with this. I also really enjoyed further delving into Verity and his connection with Fitz. Kettricken was such an awesome character and I loved how she embraced her new kingdom and tried to do right by it. Regal was an entirely other story. The way Hobb weaved in his treachery and plots was so amazing and made me despise him even more. To me, the middle of the book dragged a little bit, but once I got back in the action and ending was phenomenal. Such an amazing read and I cannot wait to continue with Assassin's Quest!
  • (5/5)
    Royal Assassin is the second book of the Farseer trilogy, which tells the story of FitzChivalry Farseer, a royal bastard and assassin. Fitz's last mission went awry, and he is resting and recovering at the beginning of this book. However, he's a King's Man and can't afford to take any time for himself, so he has to get back to his duties as the royal assassin soon.Royal Assassin is just as compelling as the previous book, Assassin's Apprentice. Fitz has grown up a little, although he's also become quite melancholy because of his failures and his perceived weaknesses. However, he's still intensely loyal to the Farseer kingdom and family, especially Prince Verity, and will do anything in his power to keep him and the Six Duchies safe.The Red Ship Raiders are continuing to plunder and destroy the Coastal Duchies, and there seems to be no stopping them. Worse still, the foppish and ambitious Prince Regal is gaining more and more influence, and he doesn't seem to care about the threat posed by the Raiders - in fact, all he cares about is living in luxury and attaining as much power as possible. Burrich has tried his best to keep Fitz from using the Wit to bond to an animal, but Fitz meets and bonds with Nighteyes, a young wolf. Fitz is already in danger - Regal hates him, and if he's caught using the Wit, it'll be certain death for him.Everything good about the last book continues in this book - every character gets even more depth and backstory, there's a lot of complex political intrigue and plotting, and it's fascinating to see Fitz make mistakes and grow as a person. Fitz is often morose, which can get annoying, but not too much. I also really liked the character of Queen-in-Waiting Kettricken and her evolving relationship with Verity.The end was a bit shocking, but I can't wait to read the conclusion!
  • (4/5)
    Fitz grows up. He Skills, he has the Wit. He goes to the Mountains. He fights men and big ships. It's not complex stuff, but it's good escapism.
  • (5/5)
    Another brilliant story about Fitz. I love him. He grabs my emotions and drags them around with him until I'm not exactly sure how I feel.

    This helping just made me even more emotionally confused, empty and drained. I cried, I laughed, I was shocked and I was excited and disappointed. There's nothing better than a book that grabs you and won't let go until you've closed the back cover.
  • (5/5)
    Audiobook - Now to the next one.
  • (4/5)
    I was given this book as a gift several years ago and never managed to get involved in the first one (I suspect I'm just worn out on coming of age books). I picked it up again while sorting through some old books of mine and found it was a cunning, enjoyable read. You don't need the first book in the series to be absorbed.
  • (5/5)
    Absolutely love this series. It's also a great entry point into the vast fantasy/adventure genre for people like me who have only read Harry Potter and the stray mainstream/commercial fantasy book.
  • (4/5)
    A strong finish to the Farseer trilogy and a nice setup for anything following (which already exists but I haven't read it).
  • (3/5)
    To be honest, I waffled over how to rate this book. I ended up giving it 3 stars, but there were huge swathes of this novel where I was tempted to give it 2. If I could sum up my reading experience in two words, it would be: mentally tiring.I really enjoyed the ending, and maybe a few chapters here and there in the middle, but I have to admit that on the whole I have more negative things to say than positive. Maybe the story actually warranted this book to be so long, but boy, several parts certainly dragged.On some level, I'm probably still getting used to Hobb's style; I discovered with her Rain Wilds Chronicles series that her individual books tend to feel like they lack direction, but when taken as a whole, the big picture eventually emerges clearly. Given Royal Assassin is the middle book of the Farseer trilogy, perhaps this was what made this "rambling narrative" feeling more apparent. Though it's been quite a while since I read the first book Assassin's Apprentice, I don't recall feeling so frustrated about it, but maybe I was just a bit more tolerant then because it was book one and that made me give it the benefit of the doubt.I was unfortunately much less patient with this book. I definitely wanted to give it a chance to show me where the story was going, but it really didn't do that until near the end. Before we got to this point, between Fitz's problems with the Forged, with Molly and with Regal, not a lot really happens and I had to fight myself from zoning out.To be fair, I just didn't find myself very interested in Fitz's character, nor did I really care about his relationship with Molly. I disliked her intensely, actually. I just really can't understand Fitz's obsession with such a clingy, melodramatic and flaky woman. Not unexpectedly, I really couldn't get into the story when so much was centered around their love and their struggles to be with each other.I also grew irritated by the fact no one besides Fitz seems to give a crap about Regal's shenanigans. I'm not sure Verity really deserves Fitz's hero-worship of him; I've always thought the King-in-Waiting is a great character, but ultimately it's the inexplicable inaction of otherwise very intelligent and rational characters that really started getting on my nerves. I really didn't like that to be the driving force behind the book.I'll definitely finish the trilogy, as there's the aforementioned "whole big picture" and all that. Like I said, I particularly liked the ending of this book and I'm quite keen on finding out what happens. Part of me thinks, hell, I've come this far already, but another part also knows it'll mostly likely come together.
  • (5/5)
    Hobb continues the story of FitzChivalry, the royal bastard, spy/assassin and mage (of sorts) with a novel that is frustrating in all the right ways. We engage so closely with the characters that we care when things don't go well for them -- as is so often the case in the troubled days of the Six Duchies. Hobb's worldbuilding is deceptively simple, creating a rich realm that is instantly believable. This installation, unlike the first, stays mostly within the capital of Buckeep, but the intrigues are so rich that it never feels limited.
  • (3/5)
    Very well developed characters, great plot, but story is rushed in parts and drags in parts. Hobb's writing style is inconsistent throughout the whole series, and I'm not crazy about it at all. It is easy to fall in love with the characters, though. I was very disappointed in the ending of the trilogy, which wraps up in a very rushed, packaged manner.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent story and great, enthusiastic narration for the audio book.
  • (4/5)
    I am truly loving this series. I love reading about Fitz and all of his trials. He is such an interesting character. I enjoy that he's not perfect and he makes mistakes. I love so many of the characters and I love that we as the reader get to know them so well. The world is so interesting and I'm loving getting to learn about it.
  • (5/5)
    Another great edition. Fitz is taking a beating though. Ready for the next book!
  • (2/5)
    Slow start. Hoping it gets better as the books progress. Story has promise
  • (5/5)
    Very well written, clear and vivid. Be patient with this story, though the book could be about 5-10hrs lighter without compromising the essence and captivating qualities. I’ve developed an affinity for/connection to all characters in such a way that the events affects me deeply. I’ll definitely read this series again in a year or two. Regal and Ramsey (I wonder if you will figure out who this is) are the same!
  • (3/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    The action of Royal Assasin takes up right where Assasin's Apprentice leaves off. Fitz Farseer slowly recovers from the poison that nearly killed him in the first book of this trilogy. At first he vows to turn his back on King Shrewd. But the continued threat from the Raiders soon brings him back to Buckkeep. The danger to Fitz and the Six Duchies grows as Prince Verity leaves to search out the Elderlings and save his people and his younger brother Regal moves in on the throne.King Shrewd continues his steady decline. Meanwhile Prince Regal continues shows himself to be spoiled, vain and totally unsuited to a kingship. As Regal's grip on the throne tightens, Fitz finds himself with few allies. His secret of beast magic proves to be both his salvation and potential destruction. Royal Assassin is fairly action packed and perfectly sets up the third and final novel of this Farseer trilogy.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I loved this series of books, and this one in particular. Robin Hobb's character development is where she really shines, and Fitz was a character I truly cared about and couldn't get out of my head. This is a good follow up to the first book, and if you enjoyed it, then you'll enjoy this one.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)
    Great continuation of the Assassins' Apprentice .. Bring on Book 3
  • (4/5)
    By reading this novel from beginning to end in three weeks, I complete this epic trilogy. The timeframe rightly suggests that I find the story compelling and looking forward to resolution; the resolution is creative and dynamic. The characters are believable and have depth. I found the repeated plot reminders and foreshadowing a wee bit redundant and acknowledge that someone who read less quickly might find these more helpful. At some point, I will begin the next series by Robin Hobb. Well worth my attention.
  • (3/5)
    Very well developed characters, great plot, but story is rushed in parts and drags in parts. Hobb's writing style is inconsistent throughout the whole series, and I'm not crazy about it at all. It is easy to fall in love with the characters, though. I was very disappointed in the ending of the trilogy, which wraps up in a very rushed, packaged manner.
  • (4/5)
    A beautiful ending to a beautiful series.

    I will briefly describe its very forgivable faults so I can move on to the gushing;
    *Fitz is not exactly a genius. There were times throughout the series, this book in particular, where I was screaming at him in my head to realise the obvious. However, it is nice for a hero to have some flaws, and though sometimes I did figure things out early, there were suprises aplenty to make up for it.
    *I will compare this to the Song of Ice and Fire series, as that is one of the few other medieval-style epic series that I have read. In comparison to that, the politics in this series were woefully unsophisticated. However, this may have been a blessing as it left me to focus more on the characters, and allowed it to be wrapped up in a trilogy, rather than in A Song of Ice and Fire's mammoth series.
    *The writing was not flawless. I regret to say that at the beginning of the second book I lost interest for a while, and forgot the genius of the first book. However, I was soon swept away again, and I was engaged with the third book from start to finish!
    *The historical fragments at the beginning of the chapters were often useless and annoying, although occasionally they added some charm or suspense to the story.

    Now to the gushing...

    The sheer humanity in the series is startling. The major draw of the series is the connections between the characters, both human and animal, created through the Skill & Wit, and mundane means. My favourite connections were between Fitz & Nighteyes, and Fitz & The Fool. The connections between the characters will probably linger in my memory long after I've forgotten the plot of the series. (On this score, the two examples of this type of bond that spring to mind are His Dark Materials, and Eragon, which both demonstrate beautiful bonds with the animal characters, although the Farseer Trilogy far surpasses them in my humble opinion).

    The magic, the Skill and the Wit, are described perfectly, and I love that the series makes ample use of the two magics, which sometimes fantasy stories fail to do. I found the use of these to forge empathy and connections between the characters to be more magical than the typical abstract kind of magic.

    The characters were all well-written, three-dimensional, and perfect in their imperfections. They were diverse, with characters from all walks of life and with different personalities. And given the often murky waters medieval fiction can enter into regarding feminism, I was very impressed with the female characters, who were just as well-written, strong, and flawed, as the male characters.

    The ending was perfect. It was bittersweet, which suited Fitz. It had just the right amount of cheese and optimism, balanced with some regrets and an awareness of future troubles.

    I hope that my fellow readers loved the series as much as I did, and that any future readers that stumble upon this decide to follow in my footsteps and take the journey.
  • (5/5)
    With this trilogy Robin Hobb positioned herself amongst the greatest fantasy writers. In the third volume we follow the epic fate of Fitz and the Realm. I especially liked the not-so-happy ending....