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Terms of Enlistment

Terms of Enlistment

Written by Marko Kloos

Narrated by Luke Daniels


Terms of Enlistment

Written by Marko Kloos

Narrated by Luke Daniels

ratings:
4.5/5 (172 ratings)
Length:
9 hours
Released:
Jan 28, 2014
ISBN:
9781480578180
Format:
Audiobook

Description

The year is 2108, and the North American Commonwealth is bursting at the seams. For welfare rats like Andrew Grayson, there are only two ways out of the crime-ridden and filthy welfare tenements, where you're restricted to 2,000 calories of badly flavored soy every day.

You can hope to win the lottery and draw a ticket on a colony ship settling off-world, or you can join the service.

With the colony lottery a pipe dream, Andrew chooses to enlist in the armed forces for a shot at real food, a retirement bonus, and maybe a ticket off Earth. But as he starts a career of supposed privilege, he soon learns that the good food and decent health care come at a steep price...and that the settled galaxy holds far greater dangers than military bureaucrats or the gangs that rule the slums.

The debut novel from Marko Kloos, Terms of Enlistment is a new addition to the great military sci-fi tradition of Robert Heinlein, Joe Haldeman, and John Scalzi.

Released:
Jan 28, 2014
ISBN:
9781480578180
Format:
Audiobook


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Reviews

What people think about Terms of Enlistment

4.6
172 ratings / 31 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    I really, really enjoyed this one.Andrew Grayson is eighteen years old, living in public housing with his mom, and eating the reconstituted protein that is food aid in this future. He wants out, and the only real option is enlistment in armed forces of the North American Confederacy. Five years of service will get him five years of banked pay at the end of it, and might get him a shot at a berth on a ship to an offworld colony. So he signs up.He wants one of the space services, Navy or Marines, but after basic, where he demonstrates a good tactical brain but no other promising military aptitudes, he's assigned to the Territorial Army. The girlfriend he met in basic, Halley, on the other hand, is going to be a drop ship pilot in the Navy. They promise to stay in touch.They actually do stay in touch.Andrew's first six months as a Territorial Army soldier are, to say the least, eventful, and we learn a lot about this future America and future Earth. And when he gets his longed-for assignment in space, in circumstances that he wouldn't have chosen, we're about to learn how difficult and generally mundane life on a partially terraformed colony world is--when something no one expected happened, and things get really exciting.All of which could be a workaday, ordinary, somewhat interesting milsf story, except it's not. Kloos is giving us real characters, in a world real enough to be grounded and believable, and different enough to be engaging, with people who have strengths and weaknesses. I really enjoyed this, and look forward to the later installments.Highly recommended.I bought this audiobook.
  • (5/5)
    An amazing read! While I feel it was extremely cowardly to back out of the Hugo nomination, I am glad I read this book. I've already started the second in the series.
  • (4/5)
    The year is 2108 and Earth has become over populated. Poverty runs rampant and most of the planet has been damaged by pollution. Humans have started colonizing space and, if you're lucky, you can win a ticket to one of the newly colonized worlds. Realizing this is a pipe-dream, Andrew Grayson chooses to join the military instead, in hopes that he may end up stationed off world. He soon learns that basic training is not that easy and that there are worse things in the universe than slum gangs or politicians.Terms of Enlistment is the first in the Frontlines series by Marko Kloos. The book is a standard military scifi. If you've read Old Man's War or seen any military movie or tv show recently, you know approximately what to expect. It doesn't break any new ground in that regards and takes a good two thirds of the book before it starts to come into its own.The story is told entirely from Grayson's first person point of view. Wanting to escape poverty, he will do whatever it takes to get off this rock. The story includes a fairly forgettable basic training, a love interest and an Earth-side combat situation. It's a story you've read or seen before without a lot of variance until Grayson finally makes it into the Navy where he boards his first ship into space. Then things start to get interesting. Alas, the story ends just as I was starting to feel vested in the Grayson and his universe.I listened to the audio book narrated by Luke Daniels. He is fantastic as always.As the author's debut novel, it shows promise for the series to come. I hope he takes the foundation he's created and runs with it. I'll be looking for book two in the near future.
  • (4/5)
    Great military sci fi. I was very pleasantly surprised by the level of detail and world building put into everything. Each new scene was so well built i could see the buildings and that layout of the place.

  • (4/5)
    3.5 rounded up. Solid mil-SF, well written and reliably entertaining.
  • (5/5)
    I'm always a little leery about the inexpensive Sci-fi books on amazon. Often they feel clumsy and thrown together without any professional intervention.

    However, hat was not the case with this book. The pacing was excellent and the character development was engrossing without being cumbersome. It was so good that I actually sat down on a Saturday and read it from cover to (digital) cover. I guess the take away here is that if you enjoy military Sci-fi than this book is worth your time.
  • (2/5)
    Not badly written but the main character/narrator is hollow. A camera and recorder would tell the same story: been there, done that. It's frustrating because each scene stands, I could visualize what happened but the characters don't stand. The hero goes from slums to army without a glitch, nothing of his past seems to stick. Why did the author chose a first person narration if we're given nothing but the "here and now"? Maybe Andrew Grayson is a model for zen life and mindfulness!... but that doesn't make him interesting or credible.
  • (4/5)
    A great military sci-fi series. Narrated by Luke Daniels and quite well at that.
  • (4/5)
    An old sci-fi military theme, from recruit to space soldier, done quite well. Plausible future environment and interesting characters generate an action filled storyline. Looking forward to the next installment.
  • (4/5)
    What you have here is your basic "Space Kablooie" novel as our protagonist Andrew Grayson wants nothing more than to get off an Earth that has seen better days and reach the stars, even if it means getting himself into a much bigger fight then the struggle for existence for daily life in the slums of Boston. Part of the reason I wanted to read this book is because I figured that I owed the man the courtesy of seeing what he had to say after he was honorable enough to take himself of the Hugo ballot that was hijacked by the so-called "Rabid Puppies" and their fellow travelers and Kloos has the virtue of writing with an immediacy that I haven't enjoyed in the last few straight-up military SF stories I've read; recommended.
  • (3/5)
    Quick, fun read with a few interesting turns of events. Wasn't particularly satisfying in any way, but I would read the sequel when it comes out.
  • (5/5)
    I think I might like military sci-fi a little bit more than I thought I did. Seems to me that, lately, I've been reading the books I thought I liked (zombie, apocalyptic) and they are crap, and not reading enough of the books I just casually read (military sci-fi) but like way better...I read another reviewer who said this book was self-published. That was a bit of a surprise - it is GOOD. And for a self-published book, it is VERY GOOD (have you read some of that drivel?)There is a great blend of action, detail and setting. No gun porn, women aren't useless, the moralizing is minimal (and not "right-wing" as it usually is in military books) and we actually care about the main character. Sheesh... what more can you ask for? Oh, right, aliens... they're there too!!I never did read Starship Troopers because I don't read Heinlein on principle, so I have no input on how much this story is like that one... Though, the very fact that Kloos' main character is not full of himself and women are present and intelligent makes me doubt it really is very much like Heinlein's book.I bought the next in the series.
  • (5/5)
    MilSciFi without any of the ponderous philosophical pitfalls all to common to the genre.
  • (5/5)
    This book was really good. The characters were well written and well voiced. I head no idea where the story was going and that made it really interesting.
  • (5/5)
    Fast paced and thrilling. Action packed, almost too much, but I love it!
  • (5/5)
    Good story line ! Can’t wait to read the next ons
  • (4/5)
    The book was good enough but I’ll listen to the next one.
  • (5/5)
    Perfect Text & Excellent Narration
    Highly Recommended Sci-Fi
    Except for one thing:
    Russians aren't as threatening as mentioned
  • (5/5)
    I am just so stunned - this is approaching Alistair Reynolds level of epic hard scifi
  • (5/5)
    I couldn´t stop listening to it...... it was like a drug!
  • (5/5)
    Frickin fantastic. got me back into books action packed from start to finish.
  • (5/5)
    Like Scalzi’s old mans war ? Like Starship Troopers? How about Haldaman’s forever war ? This really is right up there with the greats ! The narrator is superb to boot !Luke Daniels was made to read space combat!
  • (3/5)
    pulpy military sci-fi. Not usually a genre I like, but this worked well enough. Not too dark. Subsequent books in the series are more interesting and swash-buckly.
  • (5/5)
    What a great book. It keep pace and did not drag. If you like military science fiction, read this book!
  • (5/5)
    The fact that it was a space adventure and coming of age and responsibility love distance the book itself with absolutely brilliant the narrator Luke Daniels is excellent he would have to be one of the best narrators I've heard I've heard him on a few other books and he's never ever done book anything but justice
  • (2/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    This book really had potential with the premise of someone escaping poverty through military service; if there had been any real character development.

    It was as if every time the main character could have been faced with some adversity to overcome, the author just whisked it away without any challenge. Get into the highly competitive military? No problem, just go to the enlistment center. Basic training can drop any enlistee at the drop of the hat? Push over drill instructors and the protagonist waltzes through basic with no problems. Transferred to a hardened combat unit as the FNG? The squad mates practicably rub Greyson's feet when he arrives. A pointless excursion against overmatched rebels in the Balkans followed by a decent Blackhawk Down sequence, and then Greyson has to deal with some uppity MI officer, and he's saved by his squad leader and runs away to the navy. Yawn!

    In the Navy, he breezes through tech school (which made me wonder why he was selected as a grunt if his computer acumen is so high, even more curious because he grew up with little to no education) and joins up with his basic training girlfriend. Then the rest of the book just sleep walks through some first contact boringness.

    Greyson isn't challenged! He doesn't develop. There's no compelling narrative beyond "Guy joins military." I'm pretty sure this is why the book is self-published, as the writing is above average and smooth. A publisher/editor would have rejected this because there's no there, there. I think a good editor could have pulled out the story lurking beneath the waves.

    I see a lot of "Starship Troopers" references in the reviews, and let me tell you something about "Starship Troopers;" that book said something. I said something about citizenship, service and morality. This book says nothing.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (2/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I read twenty pages, then skimmed the next thirty. I struggled with the absence of environmental description - most everything is dialog. You know the characters are in a hallway, or sitting at a table, or in a city... but that's it. I couldn't make that work. Other people like this book, so it may just be a personal lack of imagination.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Excellent! Drew me in immediately, almost couldn't stop! As soon as I finished I was looking for another one ... Fortunately, he also has a Book 2! I would classify this as future military or future military sci-fi. Great writing, engaging and easy to follow.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)
    Terms of Enlistment Marko Kloos
    This book begins in dystopian slums on earth and ends on planet orbiting Capella A and it kept me enthralled all the way.The story starts out as a typical military science fiction yarn complete with armored suits, boot camp, and a tough as nails drill sergeant . We meet Andrew Grayson’s the protagonist of the story,enter the armed services and watch him grow up meet and get separated from the love of his life. During a battle he makes a decision that alters his life. How that decision changes his life is at the crux of this story.
    The early part of the story has echoes Starship Troopers by Robert Heinlein. It departs from Starship troopers in the way Kloos views the role of the military in civil affairs. Kloos explores the role of the solider and how the view of that role affects and is reflected in the life of his characters. This tension between being a good solider, loyal to your service and your buddies and the needs of civilians comes to a head after Grayson is assigned a posting on Earth and not in space and after his second mission on Earth.
    The story is also differs from Star Ship Troopers in the way Kloos writes about women in the armed services. They are not all helpless maidens, or cerebral starship pilots. The book is also a first contact story. In Kloos’s world mankind has not run into aliens and believes itself alone in the universe. The debunking of this belief comes at a terrifying cost, The book is filled with battle sequences which are choreographed in a completely understandable prose as well as thought provoking idea. I want this guy to write more stories set in this universe.
  • (5/5)
    In Terms of Enlistment, Andrew Grayson is a slum-dweller who joins the military for three good/real meals a day – unavailable on the outside – and a decent chance at an enlistment payout if he survives his five-year commitment. The book follows Grayson into the North American Commonwealth armed forces. Born in one of the huge slums in the Boston metroplex, the military offers the poor and the desperate a chance out. In the military, he'll eat real food, possibly get a chance to go off world, and, after his five-year enlistment period ends, he can cash out and buy a nice little place in the suburbs. Or so he is led to believe.The military is divided into Army, Marines, and Navy, and while Grayson wants to go to space, it's to the Territorial Army he goes, rescuing embassy employees from civil unrest and quashing riots in metroplexes like those Grayson grew up in. At first, he’s ashamed, but he quickly learns that this is where the action is and he develops pride in his unit and in himself. This military is, of course, co-ed like all sci fi militaries tend to be and of course the bathrooms are co-ed, but even this stretches the imagination when you learn the bathroom stalls have no doors. Okay, that’s just weird.As indicated, riots are common in the metroplexes, and after a particularly nasty one in Detroit, Grayson is injured in what is more or less street-to-street urban warfare. Badly injured and unfairly accused of using excessive force, Grayson transfers to the Navy, where his boot camp girlfriend is. Things change suddenly at this point. He goes off to computer network training and does well. He gets himself assigned to his girlfriend’s ship. They fly off and the two of them share as much intimacy as possible. Then, something radical happens that changes everything and they find themselves on an alien planet fighting for their survival. It’s a nice twist, somewhat unexpected, although the very ending becomes slightly predictable as the ending progresses. Nonetheless, satisfying. I found out that this is a self-published book. I have no idea why. It has the look and feel of a professionally published book. It was recommended to me by Amazon when I was browsing around and that’s the first time Amazon has ever recommended that type of book to me. And the quality of writing was quite high for a self-published book. Sure, I know some such books are quite good, but the vast majority are not, so I would have thought a traditional publisher would have picked this up. Whatever the case, I seriously enjoyed this book. There’s a lot of tension, a lot of action, moderate character development, decent plot development, the writing is quite good, the battle scenes are excellent – this is very good military sci fi and reminds me of Joe Haldeman. I don’t know whether to give if four or five stars. I’m reluctant to give books five stars unless they’re quite good, very good. In this case, the book held my attention, was a page turner, maintained my sense of tension and interest, impressed me with its military tactics, impressed me with the second half “surprise” I’ve alluded to. I guess I can’t think of any real reason not to give it five stars, so I guess I will. Five stars. Recommended.