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Snowblind

Snowblind

Written by Christopher Golden

Narrated by Peter Berkrot


Snowblind

Written by Christopher Golden

Narrated by Peter Berkrot

ratings:
4/5 (60 ratings)
Length:
11 hours
Released:
Jan 21, 2014
ISBN:
9781480564947
Format:
Audiobook

Description

In Christopher Golden's first horror novel in more than a decade-a work reminiscent of early Stephen King-Snowblind updates the ghost story for the modern age.

The small New England town of Coventry had weathered a thousand blizzards…but never one like this, where people wandered into the whiteout and vanished. Families were torn apart, and the town would never be the same.

Now, as a new storm approaches twelve years later, the folks of Coventry are haunted by the memories of that dreadful blizzard and those who were lost in the snow. Photographer Jake Schapiro mourns his little brother, Isaac, even as-tonight-another little boy is missing. Mechanic and part-time thief Doug Manning's life has been forever scarred by the mysterious death of his wife, Cherie, and now he's starting over with another woman and more ambitious crimes.

Police detective Joe Keenan has never been the same since that night, when he failed to save the life of a young boy…and the boy's father vanished in the storm only feet away. And all the way on the other side of the country, Miri Ristani receives a phone call…from a man who died twelve years ago.

As old ghosts trickle back, this new storm will prove to be even more terrifying than the last.

Spellbinding in scope and rooted deeply in classic storytelling, Snowblind is a chilling masterpiece that is both Christopher Golden's breakout audiobook and a standout supernatural thriller.

Released:
Jan 21, 2014
ISBN:
9781480564947
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Christopher Golden and Thomas Sniegoski are top genre authors whose previous collaborations include The Buffy Monster Book (with Stephen Bissette) and the script of the Xbox Buffy the Vampire Slayer video game.

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Reviews

What people think about Snowblind

4.1
60 ratings / 28 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    An enjoyable ‘chiller’ that takes place during two horrendous snowstorms. I would have liked to get to know the characters and cared for them a little more but the development and depth is what one expects of the genre. This somewhat different ghost story contained enough of a twist and creepiness to keep me entertained and I like the reveal of the truth behind the cause of the disappearances. It’s possible to imagine some scenes done well made into a film.
  • (5/5)
    Thrilling, gripping and icecold.
  • (4/5)
    A chilling offering featuring a group of spirits that visit a small Connecticut town during a major blizzard. It seems for the last 12 years there is a blizzard with bizarre happenings that no one can explain taking place. The reader encounters the horrors in the very beginning of the story with the original horror-show inflicted on the town and then the aftermath the residents must somehow live with. The question for the town folk is what will come out of the blizzard this time and who will be left?
  • (2/5)
    The story didn't kick into gear until about 75% of the way in. So much time was spent baldly establishing the 1 dimensional characters and situations that any dramatic reveals had been clearly hinted at earlier. The action is short and probably the most passive climax I've read in a thriller.
  • (4/5)
    3.5/5 stars.

    The small New England town of Coventry is hit by a blizzard. People hunker down for the night, prepared to ride out the power outages and snow with their loved ones. Other people ride through the night, protecting the citizens of Coventry. And some people, some very unfortunate people, encounter the things that live inside the blizzard, and those people die.

    Long years later another blizzard is coming, and the people of Coventry who lived through the earlier blizzard are naturally apprehensive. But no one is prepared for what this blizzard will bring because with it comes the dead and those things who are chasing them.

    Snowblind was eerie and enthralling. I enjoyed the different ways people coped with the tragedy of the first blizzard and how that shaped them into the people who were able to battle the second. As a New Englander who has been through many a blizzard I can say that Golden captured the frightening feeling of being alone in the dark with only the sound of the falling snow to let you know that anything else exists. Great book.

    (Provided by publisher)
  • (4/5)
    Summer is the perfect time to read Snowblind, and preferably with people or a dog around.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this book. It was scary and mysterious and just a bit magical. The first part of the book details the losses of a number of people during a blizzard in a small town outside of Boston. The survivors are left wondering what caused their loved ones to walk out into the middle of blizzard never to return again.

    The second part of the book is twelve years after the first blizzard and the town is preparing for another blizzard. For those that were intimately touched by the losses of twelve years earlier, it is a stressful time. Memories and questions come flooding back and people start imagining they are seeing the ghosts of their loved ones.

    I really liked the suspense of the first blizzard. The buildup to the second blizzard was good. Golden has created a story with many different characters both from the first blizzard and the second blizzard and manages to keep them well defined throughout the book.

    I would definitely recommend this book to fans of Dean Koontz and Stephen King. Just don't read it during a blizzard!
  • (3/5)
    Want to read something scary? How about something scary and almost physical in its presentation? Snowblind is what you want. A winter storm twelve years earlier took the lives of a number of people in a small town and left survivors guilt ridden and witnesses questioning their sanity. Now another killer storm is on its way and things are getting weird again. The dead are making phone calls. Children seem... different. This story moves slowly at first but then takes off and packs a punch of pure ice. You can literally feel the winter cold and icy fear emanating from the pages. This book is coming out in January 2014. What perfect timing.
  • (3/5)
    Twelve years ago a blizzard hit the small New England town of Coventry. A blizzard that brought far more danger than normal. The storm was alive with something dangerous and evil and anyone who dared walk into it never survived. Twelve years later there are people that still remain in Coventry that were affected by that storm and now a new storm is coming with the same dangers.Blizzards. Ghosts. Supernatural Thriller. An amazing blurb from Stephen King. All reasons I was highly anticipating Snowblind. Unfortunately, this ended up being only passably mediocre but possessed some high points worth mentioning. The most skillful aspect of this novel was the chilling introduction that had me anticipating a sleepless night with the lights left on. Unfortunately, following the frightening intro came a long and drawn out and relatively dull middle. The story was chock-full of characters and each and every one of their back stories. I enjoyed reading about their connection to the storm from twelve years prior, but it was done in excess and with too many characters. They all sort of bled together after a point and it was hard to differentiate between all of them.The crescendo was not steady and by the time the climax rolled around the thrilling angles didn't produce the same effect as the introduction had. I also attribute that to the fact that the revelation of what the evils in the storm were wasn't as eerie as I had expected. [spoiler]It was basically icy Gremlins and while they were creepy it seemed almost corny at times. The ghost of Niko coming back didn't help the corniness either.[/spoiler]Snowblind perfectly captured the suffocating feel of a blizzard and was quite eerie at times. While it was an enjoyable and haunting tale, a surplus of characters detracted from the creepiness and the horror aspects just weren't consistent enough to keep me fully spellbound.
  • (4/5)
    If you'd been looking for a completely terrifying horror novel to consume during the recent (and ominously named) Polar Vortex, Snowblind would have been the perfect choice. It's still a great scary winter read - full of icy cold, foot after foot of snow, and something lurking out there in the silent white. Well-written, great characters, scary events that will make the hair stand up on the back of your neck - this book's got it all.During a long ago winter blizzard in the town of Coventry, people disappeared under mysterious circumstances, seemingly taken by snow blindness - walking out into the cold never be seen again alive. Mr. Golden captures these people and the ones they loved in the moments before the disaster and with quick, deft character sketches makes them as real to you as any character you spend a lifetime getting to know. These people matter and the pain of their loss resonates throughout the story. Twelve years later another storm is coming and strange things are happening again - particularly to the people who lost loved ones all that long time ago. Are they coming back? What if they do?This was a great read - a good old-fashioned horror story focused on the horrors both outside and inside as Mr. Golden takes you through a white landscape and the wind's howl. Read this book.
  • (3/5)
    There was just something so surreal,, reading this book by my front window, listening to the wind gusts and watching the snow fall and swirl around. Not blizzard conditions but close enough to make the timeliness of this read apropos. A terrible blizzard impacted Coventry and many people disappeared or were taken. Jake saw his brother taken by an icy hand reaching through their opened window. Years later another storm is forecast for Conventry and those that lived through the last one are edgy and afraid of what this one will bring.There are things in the storm that cannot be contained. Are they real, or exactly what are they? You see, things in the cold seek warmth and one never knows where they will appear next.A good modern day ghost story. The middle of the book was not as good as the beginning and the end. There was suspense, and some good chills, a fascistic looking cover and it maybe just enough to make one look over their shoulder in a snow storm.ARC from NetGalley.
  • (4/5)
    This was my first "Golden" book - nicely creepy - and the story held together. It's probably not my favorite form of reading material but every now and then a good ghost story is a good diversion.
  • (4/5)
    Twelve years ago 18 people were lost in the town of Coventry. The rumors persist that there was something out in the storm that took the souls that were lost that night. And now another record breaking storm is on the way. In that storm, the living and the dead will fight to survive. This was an interesting and chilling book. I love books about snow storms. I am not really sure why. But this is a really good one. We get to know the people who survived and how their lives changed after that storm. And we get to know the lost. The monsters in the snow are never really explained and maybe it is better that way. If I was any of the folks from this story I would be packing my bags for Florida, stat.
  • (4/5)
    Christopher Golden's Snowblind brings to mind the work of Stephen King. Set in a small Massachusetts town during a blizzard, the story introduces several groups of characters. Each group suffers a life-changing loss during the storm, with supernatural creatures arriving with the snow and taking the lives of loved ones. The story then fast-fowards 12 years into the future to the eve of another horrific blizzard. The new storm brings back the memories (and spirits!) of those lost in the past. The plot is engaging, but like King, Golden's main focus is on the characters themselves and the small-town New England lives they lead. The writing isn't quite as developed as Stephen King's, but it's not bad.I read an advanced readers copy of the book, which I received through NetGalley. There are some storyline problems, which will hopefully be resolved by the time the novel is published. For example, the minor character of Gavin comes back in the form of Harpwell. Torres is shown to be Gavin's father, but at a later point in the book Torres seems to be Gavin himself. It's confusing and needs to be fixed. I also found it odd that T.J's mother was anxious for him to find a wife, but 12 years later is nasty and unaccepting of her daughter-in-law, although she had never even met her. These points, however, are fairly minor. All in all, the novel is a fast paced, entertaining read.
  • (3/5)
    The city of Coventry had given itself over to the storm. Roads became impassable, even the snow plows weren't making many appearances. The snow blanketed everything, creating drifts that resembled ocean waves on the streets. Sixteen inches of ice and snow were predicted and this blizzard would long be remembered with fear and haunting memories. Eighteen people had died or disappeared in this blizzard. Now, twelve years later, another blizzard is predicted and people are becoming unsettled. The police department is receiving many calls from folks in Coventry, claiming that they have seen ghosts, and the possibility that the dead lingered on is causing fear and uneasiness in the town. And the story unfolds ---I was swept into the storyline early on with its well constructed plot, fully expecting a riveting thriller. Unfortunately, as the story continued, it just lost the excitement and fell rather flat for me. The book certainly had an interesting premise, but just never developed a crescendo of suspense and had a rather luke-warm ending. This was an interesting book, but not one I'd enthusiastically recommend. 3 stars.I received a complimentary copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • (3/5)
    I got bit again. I did not notice that there was a recommendation from Stephen King on this book. I have vowed that the books I like and the ones he likes are never the same. It is not that this story was bad, or poorly written, it was just boring, and way too long. Chop out 200 pages and it would have been better.
  • (5/5)
    This book scared my socks off, and maybe it's partially because of the monstrous Chicago winter we've had, but this is also just a fantastically spooky novel that doesn't have to rely on blood and guts to scare people.Twelve years ago, eighteen people died or disappeared mysteriously in a ferocious blizzard that attacked a small New England town. Families were torn apart, marriages were broken, and people all across town watched their loved ones die before their eyes. And in the middle of the storm, there were vague whispers about the "ice men."Fast forward to the present day, when most everyone is still afraid of the big snow storms that come their way, although no one has died in nearly a decade. But there's a doozy of a blizzard coming up, and people all across town are acting strangely...almost as if they've become different people. And the whispers about the ice men are starting up again...There is such an ominous, foreboding tone that seeps into every page of the novel and never lets up. Part of it is the fear of being stuck in a blizzard without heat/power/food, but there's the undeniable supernatural presence as well, and this is where the real terrors lie. Christopher Golden plays upon our fear of the unknown by only giving us glimpses of the ice men...in the distance on a darkened road, behind a shed in the middle of a blizzard, in front of a second story window on a snowy night. It's truly terrifying, to the point where I was jumping at tiny noises and having a hard time reading it in my empty apartment.This is also a technique that has translated extremely well into horror movies (the subtle yet terrifying effects in the Woman in Black spring to mind immediately), so this would be a great novel to suggest for someone who maybe hasn't read many horror novels but is a huge fan of scary movies.The characters are complex and well-developed, and there is a keen sense of grief, love, and loss mixed in with the scary bits as well. This may actually make the horror more pronounced, since we have an emotional investment in these characters and can't bear to see them take another loss. It's an unusual combination, but it works extremely well. I have a strong appreciation for horror novels with emotional depth, and this one ranks up there with the best of them.We do ultimately learn why and how the ice demons have come to this town, and although the explanation feels a little contrived, it doesn't majorly detract from the rest of the story. In a way, it almost doesn't matter WHY the ice men are there. We just know that they ARE there and they're terrifying.A great horror novel that takes the genre beyond its conventions, and I will definitely suggest this one for anyone looking for an honest-to-goodness scare.Readalikes:Small town horror obviously has its roots in Stephen King's novels, particularly his earlier ones. Although the monsters may be different, 'Salem's Lot offers small town horror, complex characters, and a strong emotional depth. Pet Sematary and It also play upon our fear of the unknown, deliver serious scares, and are some of his most classic small-town horror novels.The Abominable - Dan Simmons. Terror hides behind heavy snowfalls in these atmospheric, thrilling horror novels. Both stories combine survivalist fears with supernatural beings, creating an all-consuming terror for the reader. The Terror would fit this description as well.Other horror novels that combine genuine scares with emotional depth: The Dead Path - Stephen Irwin; The Good House - Tananarive Due; The White Devil - Justin Evans; NOS4A2 - Joe Hill; Help For the Haunted - John Searles (although this is more suspense than genuine horror); Ghost Road Blues - Jonathan Maberry.Horror novels that don't rely on blood and guts to scare the reader: The Woman in Black - Susan Hill; The Unseen - Alexandra Sokoloff; Floating Staircase - Ronald Malfi.
  • (3/5)
    3.5 stars.

    I received a copy via Netgalley.

    A very enjoyable, engaging novel. The intense snow and small town setting made for a very atmospheric creepy horror. Lots of characters to get used to but each story line was well written and connected well with the flow of the plot line. A good mix of small towners, some likeable, some not so likeable and some rather meh characters.

    Even with such a large cast it all came together to be quite intriguing. Some nice creepy buts worked in. Basic plot being twelve years ago a huge blizzard came to a small town and scary stuff happened. People disappeared and died and the people left behind had to find ways to deal and move on.

    Now another storm is due to hit and tension is high and creepy stuff is happening again.

    Quite absorbing one I got into it, not so much horror in the shock and gore more of a something in the dark and snow that until the end you don't quite know what and how real it was. Coupled with some nice chilling snow storm description it was intense and definitely had a creep factor.

    The plot worked well with some good twists and a sneaky last minute didn't see that coming ending.

    Overall an absorbing read perfect for a dark winter night. Thank you Netgalley and St Martin's Press for approving my request to view this title.
  • (5/5)
    Great story - scary! But it also revolves around love and family and sacrifices we make.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this book, it was creepy without the blood and gore of most horror books. It was a little slow at times but kept me listening. Just imagine amid a bad snow storm the lights are out and you happen to look out the window....... Chilling, good read.
  • (5/5)
    Wow! Talk about sitting at the edge of your seat!
  • (3/5)
    I'll never think of a big snowstorm in the same way again, what with the supernatural goings-on in this story. Creepy and atmospheric. What lowered the rating for me was the profusion of profanity and too much [graphic] sex for my taste, but the basic story was solid.
  • (3/5)
    What an interesting book. It was slow moving but i felt compelled to finish what I started. I almost wish there was more to it. Overall, a fun read.
  • (5/5)
    This book is a stunning piece of storytelling and scene setting. The author really knows how to make it three dimensional, and in a horror piece, that gets to ya. Through a seamless integration of description, dialogue, and atmosphere, Snowblind comes alive in such a way as to make the ghosts, monsters, and lost ones breathe with detail. Something has to be said for the pacing as well. There is not one place in this novel that is wasted storytelling. Every paragraph serves a purpose and draws you ever further into the tribulations of Coventry and its inhabitants. I loved the horror elements in this book. It was at times in your face but also it could be very subtle. A wisp of snow on the wind, a voice on that same wind, a faint figure dancing in the distance… More times than I can count I was shivering in more than just cold and leaving my light on. I also liked how not every character got their happy ending; some of the innocent bystander characters were lost along the way. And the end was very ambiguous. I loved that! The reader is left not knowing if all the lost souls got to “cross over” or if something else entirely happened. And the very end scene with the blue eyes? Yeah, still makes me ponder and grin at the great suspense and horror.The characters are as three-dimensional as the settings in this novel. Everyone has their virtues and vices, their goals, ambitions, and drive. I was enthralled reading how everyone dealt with their own horror experiences and seeing how it changed them twelve years later when the next big storm hit. How each character dealt with their losses and seeing how it changed them and their relationships was the meat of the story for me. This novel is a shining example of how horror should be. Intricate storytelling, atmospheric scene setting, three-dimensional characters, and horror elements that keep the lights on, this novel has them all. Highly recommended for a read in this Halloween month, just don’t forget the blanket to hide under.
  • (4/5)
    Twelve years ago, in the New England town of Coventry, a blizzard raged, taking the life of several of the town’s residents. Among the dead is a small boy, Isaac, who fell out of his window after claiming to see monsters in the yard…except his older brother claims that the boy didn’t fall, that he saw the monsters reach through the screen and yank the little boy out.The town has never stopped mourning these horrible deaths, the loss of their parents, their children, spouses, and friends. And lately strange things have been happening in the town: a respected politician suddenly forgets how to drive, a police officer is acting strangely, a little girl suddenly starts behaving like an old woman, the best friend of a woman who died in the storm suddenly falls for the dead woman’s husband, a man she never much cared for before, and a young boy has disappeared after his parents die in a car crash. As the police hunt for the boy, the town is bracing for another big storm…and for whatever came with it last time.Snowblind is a particularly chilling horror tale in more ways than one. It is creepy and atmospheric and guaranteed to send more than few shivers down the spine. It also helps that author Christopher Golden has created a fairly large but likable cast of characters to ensure that we, the readers, become invested in their stories and all the possible and frequently deadly outcomes.One caution though: I read this story at night during one of the worst blasts of the Polar Vortex (-41C with wind chill) which may have made the story a tad more compelling as I listened to the wind howling outside as I read about the wind howling inside. I really don’t recommend this as it did have a detrimental effect on my ability to sleep.
  • (5/5)
    In the midst of a raging blizzard, more than a dozen people in the small New England town of Coventry lose their lives. A young boy falls from a window, a teen is electrocuted while sledding and others simply wandered into the snow, their bodies discovered only after the storm passed, though some are never found at all. Twelve years later another blizzard approaches the town and with it comes the memories of that dark time..and something else.Despite the heatwave my town is currently enduring, I experienced chills running down my spine as I read Snowblind. This supernatural horror is a slow building psychological thriller, that builds on feelings of unease and dread until it culminates in a fierce life or death battle. The book begins with the deaths in the first storm, hinting at a sinister force, before jumping ahead twelve years as another major storm descends on the town. Here Golden explores the consequences of the previous blizzard for the family and friends who survived before revealing their terrifying fates.The cast is large and varied, though intrinsically connected by their experiences and losses in the first storm. I found it fairly easy to track them as Golden reveals each character, their fears, their flaws and their desires. They mostly typify small town residents, ordinary people caught up in an extraordinary event. In particular focus is Jake, a photographer, whose youngest brother died in the last storm, and Detective Keenan, who has since felt he failed his community. Both witnessed something during the storm that they have tried hard to forget and now are confronted with something they can’t hope to understand.This came close to a five star read for me except that Golden fell into the trap of trying to explain the inexplicable which blunts the mystique, and quite frankly, once all is said and done, why would the characters not immediately be thinking of relocating to somewhere, anywhere, it doesn’t snow, ever?Still, if your city is currently in the grip of a snowstorm I would recommend caution before reading Snowblind, you may never listen to the howl of the wind or watch the snow fall without apprehension again. This is a gripping chiller.
  • (4/5)
    Coventry is a small New England town which has seen its share of snowstorms, but one night a snowstorm hits which will leave the town reeling. Many people not only die, but disappear. The entire town is affected by their loss, but some more so than others. Twelve years on and another huge snowstorm is on its way. The survivors of the previous storm are on edge. They are full of regret for their actions during the last storm; a son who never made it home to comfort his mother; a policeman who was unable to save a young boy; a husband who didn’t go home to his wife; and Jake who saw something in the snow and allowed it to take his little brother. Now an adult, Jake is a crime scene photographer who cannot forget what he believes he saw that night. A small boy disappears from a car accident where both his parents have died. The police are doing their best to search for him while the storm grows in force. When this boy turns up at Jake’s house, the truth about the storms and what they conceal comes out. Weird things are happening all over town. A young girl starts to behave like her Grandmother, a policeman is acting strangely, barbing Detective Keenan about his failure to save the boy during the previous storm, and a woman receives a phone call from her dead father.Both a ghost story and horror, “Snowblind” had a lot of promise. I enjoyed the plot; I liked the author’s straightforward storytelling and his ability to build tension so convincingly. But I was disappointed that I didn’t get to know the characters better. I would have liked to see a bit more depth in all of them. Although the snowstorm itself had me reaching for a blanket, even though it is the middle of summer here, I also wanted to know the town of Coventry itself a bit better. My imagination had a bit of a hard time trying to conjure up a vision of this cold, cold place. But, having said that, I found myself reading well into the night in order to find out just what would happen next.
  • (4/5)
    The people who live in Coventry, Massachusetts are used to blizzards, but this one was one of the worst on record; both for the duration of the storm and the 18 people that disappeared. They didn’t wander off and get lost in the snow, to be found later. Nope, they just disappeared. Of the people left behind Jake Shapiro has the worst time of it when the snow starts every year, because he recalls his little brother falling (being pulled?) through their bedroom window before his very eyes. Twelve years later another super-storm is predicted for Coventry and the townspeople are getting very anxious about it again. But this time things are different … some people are coming back!

    This book had an amazing introduction by Stephen King and I was anticipating a really good ghost story as I started reading Snowblind. Admittedly, I am a little bit of a “ghost story snob” so I have to say this was not technically a ghost story. The horror element in the book was excellent. It was a reasonably fresh concept, similar to “The Returned” but with the scary factor amped up considerably. There was a considerable amount of time spent on the back-story for the main characters and, although some reviewers disagree, I think it added interest to the book. I cared about what was happening to the characters because I knew why they were acting a certain way. It made me want to keep reading. Despite the questionable nature of the “ghosts” Mr. Golden has given me one of the better horror novels I have read so far this year.