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Enchanted

Enchanted

Written by Nora Roberts

Narrated by Alexander Cendese


Enchanted

Written by Nora Roberts

Narrated by Alexander Cendese

ratings:
4/5 (38 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Released:
Mar 15, 2014
ISBN:
9781480588530
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Lovely, guileless Rowan Murray was drawn to darkly enigmatic Liam Donovan with a force she'd never imagined could exist. But before Liam could give Rowan his love, he first had to trust her with the incredible truth about himself…and his family.
Released:
Mar 15, 2014
ISBN:
9781480588530
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

NORA ROBERTS is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of more than 200 novels, including Legacy, The Awakening, Hideaway, Under Currents, The Chronicles of The One trilogy, and many more. She is also the author of the bestselling In Death series written under the pen name J.D. Robb. There are more than 500 million copies of her books in print.

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Reviews

What people think about Enchanted

4.2
38 ratings / 24 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    This was the romance novel I ever read so my opinion may be a little skewed, but the story hasn't lost any of its magic no matter how many times I reread it. Rowan is very much a heroine I can identify with and Liam is a hero that captures the readers interest (both things I find desirable in any book).
  • (3/5)
    Fourth in the Donovan legacy and this feels like it was tagged on a bit. It introduces a cousin that has never been mentioned in any of the previous three books and it's unclear how he fits in to the family. But still a light and interesting read.
  • (4/5)
    Fourth in the series about the magical Donovan cousins.Rowan Murray has always been the quintessential good girl, but she really needs a break, so she accepts a friend's offer of a quiet vacation in a remote cabin.Her nearest neighbor is sexy and mysterious Liam Donovan who is also, though she's unaware of it, the wolf she's seen prowling around, and that she eventually befriends.Liam's next in line to head his family, an eventuality that weighs heavily on him and that tends to set him apart from his cousins.Rowan, too, is the victim of family expectations. Her family grows increasingly insistent that she cease her foolishness and come home, go back to teaching, and marry the man they've chosen for her.It's a pleasant story, but there are a few things that get in the way of completely enjoying it. Chief among them is that Liam tends to be a voyeur when he's in wolf form. It's a bit creepy, to be honest, and even though I've read this book a few times, I'm still not sure if I believe that Rowan's not angry with him when she finds out.There's also Rowan's situation with her family. They're realistic enough, but they made me mad. A revelation later in the book helps to explain some of her mother's willful blindness, but I spent most of the book really irritated with them. Their confusion and concern for her well-being came across clearly enough--from their perspective, she's just abandoned her life, so they're worried. I didn't quite understand the pressure to marry the boyfriend, however.Part of that was Rowan's fault. She's a bit of a wimp--okay, more than a bit--when it comes to her family. Instead of explaining to them that she didn't really want what they thought she wanted, she just runs off. But I'll forgive her that, because she does develop a backbone eventually.I liked Liam's dilemma. He's not sure he wants the responsibility, but he's determined to do it right if he accepts. And therefore he can't fall in love with someone who's not also a witch. His parents drop cryptic hints that are both amusing and irritating.I really can't put my finger on why I didn't love this book--as you can see, because I'm rambling, trying to figure it out. Maybe it's that it doesn't end at the right place. It feels like it should have been either shorter--say, novella-length, or much longer--single-title-length. Various plot threads, like Rowan's heritage and Liam's eventual rise to power, were just not really developed all that well, and I think I'd have liked the story better if they were either dropped altogether or expanded. Maybe that's it.Anyway, still a pleasant enough story, and we get to check in with the other Donovans, which is fun, if a bit pointless (another reason why the head-of-the-family thead should be expanded).
  • (3/5)
    Didn't enjoy this story as much as the first three in the Donovan Legacy
  • (4/5)
    I really liked Rowan Murray and her reasons for moving to her friend's cabin and her growth of backbone while she did it. I liked it. Liam Donovan grew on me but I didn't really see a development of a relationship and most of the supernatural was very much incidental, you could have removed most of it without really changing the story much, except the shape-shifting, I loved how she fell in love with the wolf-him first.It was a fun read, light and entertaining.Originally published in 1999 it combines a minor bit of supernatural with the romance and melds the two well.
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful story about Sunday Woodcutter, one of 7 sisters. What is all the fairy tales you are familiar with happened to one family?
    I really enjoyed this book--but I should admit that I know the author! Still, I would recommend it. I look forward to the rest of the series--especially Thursday's story.
  • (4/5)
    the frog prince and every other fairy tale for a long while- jack and the beanstalk, cinderella, sleeping beauty, snow white, etc. all seemlessly melded into a glorious new tale.
  • (4/5)
    This is a super cute story. I really love stories that are character driven and Alethea Kontis did an excellent job making me feel and relate to the characters. I thought it was an interesting idea, combining a bunch of fairy tales in one story.
  • (5/5)
    I'm a sucker for good, old-fashioned fairy tales. Always have been. Therefore, when I read modern takes on fairy tales, I'm extra critical. Probably the most important thing with a fairy tale isn't the setting or even the magic--it's that voice, a childlike feeling of wonder that accepts the extraordinary as it is.Enchanted absolutely nails this. And the setting. And the magic. The entire book feels cozy and endearing. It's YA, the sort of YA that's perfect for anyone 11 and up who loves a solid, nostalgic fairy tale.Sunday is a relatable heroine, the youngest of a full brood of siblings. Within the first few pages, she encounters a talking frog. She takes this quite in stride. This frog is, of course, a prince under enchantment. She and the prince have an incredible chemistry. I wouldn't call this a romance book, though their attraction is vital to the story, but wow, is it a lovely romance. Again, it feels cozy and just plain RIGHT. It's probably the best chemistry I've encountered in a YA book in a while.Rumbold, the prince, has a dark past. Living as a frog isn't easy, but even before that time he didn't have an easy life--which was partly his own doing, and that is something he must come to accept. Too often, it feels like the woman in the romance is the one who must change or adapt while the guy is hunky and perfect and if he has a dark past, that's just part of the twisted allure. Not so here. They both mature a great deal, which also allows them to grow together.The supporting cast sparkles with life. Sunday's family is unique, and sometimes a tad confusing because of the sheer number of characters, but since they are all distinct individuals, it becomes clear soon enough. Many, many fairy tales are woven into this single novel, and to name them all would spoil things. Sunday's family alone is a tangled knot of fairy tale references, and part of the fun is noticing the references and how they come together in entirely unexpected ways.I did receive this book for free as part of my 2012 Hugo and Nebula Award reading, but this is one I absolutely want to buy and share. It's just that good. I will definitely read the next books in the series as they come out.
  • (4/5)
    Interesting mix of fairytale lore all in one place. I started to anticipate what would happen next based on the characters introduced. Fun, quick read for those fans of any of the fairytale spin-offs like The Princess and the Hound; Sun and Moon, Ice and Snow; The Goose Girl; Princess of Glass; and Entwined.
  • (4/5)
    Sunday Woodcutter is the seventh daughter of a seventh daughter. Everything she writes comes true, so she is careful to write only about things that have already happens. When she encounters an enchanted frog in the woods, she begins to share her family's stories.A delightful mix of pretty much all of the traditional fairy tales.
  • (4/5)
    Great book! Loved all the connections with other fairy tales! Very sweet light reading.
  • (4/5)
    Review originally published on my blog: AWordsWorth.blogspot.comI've been wanting to read this one for a while - look at that cover, and tell me you're not intrigued! - so I was very happy when it arrived at my library. (A signed edition, no less!) Sunday is the youngest of the Woodcutter children, and as the seventh daughter of a seventh daughter, has quite a future ahead of her. Only, she doesn't realize it. All she knows is that what she writes comes true, and her family has had its unfair share of strange "luck." Oh, and she met an enchanted frog in the woods and fell in love - only to have him disappear the day of a horrible storm that wrought changes of untold scope on Sunday's life.We're all familiar with the story of "The Frog Prince," but Enchanted is a fun, sometimes strange, take on the story - weaving in other stories and elements that are just begging to be built upon in future novels. I fell in love with Sunday's spunk and free-ness, but the whole cast of characters is quirky and personable. Prince Rumbold is endearingly human in his post-frog incarnation, and his faithful friends are colorful persons in their own right. Enchanted ended too soon, and I dearly hope that more of the Woodcutter stories are told!
  • (4/5)
    Sunday Woodcutter, the youngest in a family whose daughters are all named after days of the week, loves to write stories. She's even happier when she meets an enchanted frog in the woods who likes to listen to them. But when her kiss breaks the spell, the frog transforms into Prince Rumbold, whom her family despises. True love struggles to overcome family disputes in this clever adaptation of several fairy tales.
  • (5/5)
    Sunday Woodcutter, seventh daughter of a seventh daughter, has to be careful what she writes -- the things she puts in writing have a tendency to come true. When Sunday meets a talking frog in the forest, she has no idea what sort of adventures are in store for her. Balls and godmothers, wishes and beanstalks, shoes and axes and more all fit together in the intricate puzzle that is the plot of this novel. All of these elements are woven through the lives of the Woodcutter family, where fairy tales are the stuff of everyday life.This is one of those books that isn't based on a specific fairy tale, but takes elements from different tales and meshes them together. It manages to be funny but not silly, and there are undertones of real darkness and evil that elevated this book above titles for younger readers (such as Once Upon a Marigold). The closest comparison I can think of is Juliet Marillier's Wildwood Dancing. I was also reminded of the Enchanted Forest Chronicles. Some readers may find the number of tales referenced a bit too much, but as for me, I was completely . . . enchanted.
  • (4/5)
    I have had this on my to read list for a while now. I'm a sucker for fairy tales.Enchanted by Alethea Kontis is an amalgamation of every fairy tale you've ever heard of. The main protagonists are Sunday, the seventh daughter of a seventh daughter, and Rumbold, the prince that was enchanted into a frog. From their meeting, there is a whirlwind of balls, giants, dancing princesses, geese that lay golden eggs, both good and evil fairy godmothers, you get the idea.There are wonderful things about this book. Sunday and Rumbold are both very likeable characters. Kontis intertwines stories that we've heard all of our lives into one story. It's a feat that is difficult with a nice result.It's funny because as I was reading this book, I thought of Seventh Son by Orson Scott Card (the seventh son of a seventh son). My second thought was that it almost felt like a bunch of creative writing contest entries strung together. The author's note at the end reveals that Card was in her mind and that she did enter several fairy tale contests.Many times during this book, I was for lack of another word, enchanted. But other times, I just felt she was trying to do way too much in too little space. I loved all the references, but I almost felt in fairy tale overload. It's a difficult balance to maintain, and I'm not sure she quite succeeded.That said, it was a book well worth reading, and I'm not sorry that I undertook this adventure. Kontis has a rich imagination that will serve her well.
  • (4/5)
    Review Courtesy of Dark Faerie TalesQuick & Dirty: A fairy tale retelling that encompasses many of your childhood classic favorites, all told into one magical story.Opening Sentence: My name is Sunday Woodcutter, and I am doomed to a happy life.The Review:In Enchanted, Althea Kontis takes us on this charming adventure, mostly surrounding a girl and her frog prince. Sunday Woodcutter is the seventh daughter of Seven. Her sisters and brothers before her, each have their own gifts, making it easy to be overlooked in her unhappy state. But as the seventh daughter, she is destined to be “blithe and bonny and good and gay.” Enchanted begins as Sunday narrates her first meeting with Grumble, a frog who cannot remember his past. Since Grumble does not have any memories of his own, Sunday tells him stories of her family, indulging him with wonderful details and whimsical tales. Sunday’s voice is matter-of-fact, a little somber, and in my mind, monotone. But to me, it wasn’t about how Sunday said things, it was about what she said, and to whom.Together, Sunday and Grumble form a friendship so pure and true, that it definitely withstands any faerie magic in the land. Through the stories told, and memories cherished, Sunday and Grumble shows us who they are, who they were, and in my mind, who Kontis wants them to be. Sunday tells tale after tale, with hints of stories like The Princess and the Pea, Sleeping Beauty, and Jack and the Beanstalk, filled with Kontis’ own enchantment and magic.But faerie magic isn’t the only powerful thing in the land, with Sunday’s honest love, frog Grumble transforms back into Prince Rumbauld. Rumbauld has paid for his mistakes, hence the frog transformation, but it isn’t the end of his childhood consequences. Enchanted now takes the narration from Rumbauld’s point of view, and his renewed heart, where he takes us on the journey from beast to man. Rumbauld is dreamy, and filled with determination. Where he has many faults to make amends for, his journey is realistic. He really suffers and you can feel his pain. Kontis didn’t spare him when she threw those verbal punches.Sunday is the seventh daughter, of a seventh daughter. And while her siblings have talents and beauty that surpasses her own, Sunday holds magic deep within herself. Whether it be the power in her words, or the strength of her love, Sunday is a heroine that definitely rewrites the rules. Her outlook on life is grey, jaded by her family’s past and the stories that haunt her. She is expressive, and sometimes naive, but she redeems herself time and time again. Isn’t it true that without experiences, we do not truly live?All of the characters are full of imaginative riches, adding to the humor and tragedies spoken throughout the book. With each tale comes a lesson, and with each of those lessons, comes a progression in the story that transforms Enchanted from a simple fantasy, to bewitching magic. Each one had their own part, whether it be a romantic element or a wicked one.Kontis’ world is magical, allowing for her characters to take center stage, and for her plot to progress in an organic fashion. To me, her world is a supporting character, complementing and challenging the heroes and heroines in the story. Enchanted contains all of the best part of familiar childhood fairy tales, but with Kontis’ own creative spin to the story. Kontis’ voice is clear and definite, never allowing you to question whose story this is. The plot is definitely enchanting, mesmerizing with the intricate paths that the journey brings. Imagination is your only barrier when it comes to Enchanted. Read with your heart and follow your instincts when you fall in love with Enchanted.Notable Scene:“You have ruined me, Sunday. I didn’t realize how much I longed for the company of others until I had your words. When they are gone, the nights are darker. The silence is loud and bottomless, and I am empty. I miss them, my beloved Sunday, and I miss you.It was no use fighting; the tears came anyway. She was powerless to break his curse, but she could give him what she had. She opened her book the next blank page and started writing. when she was done, she leaned back and smiled at her friend. “‘Sunday was nothing’” she read aloud, “‘until she met Grumble – a beautiful man, with the soul of a poet. He was her best friend in the whole wide world, and she loved him with all her heart.’” She closed the book gently in her lap. Her chest hurt. Her hands shook.FTC Advisory: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt provided me with a copy of Enchanted. No goody bags, sponsorships, “material connections,” or bribes were exchanged for my review.
  • (4/5)
    I've been reading a lot of YA lit over the last year, and have enjoyed, to varying degrees, everything I have picked up. I also enjoyed Enchanted. However, this is one of those titles that leans more heavily toward the young than the adult.Kontis has designed quite a mash-up of fairy tales in her story of Sunday Woodcutter. Pretty much every major fairy tale has some trope that pops up in the book. Fairy godmothers, curses, magic kisses, magic beans, foundlings, changelings, and more all come to fruition. Sometimes I felt like the author threw everything but the kitchen sink into the story. It was interesting, but to encompass so many elements it required a lot of exposition. A lot. So, the characters don't do very much until the last third of the book. Thankfully, that last third was very entertaining, but I put the book down to do other things many times until I reached it.That said, the writing shows a lot of imagination, and potential. I loved learning about Sunday's sisters, all named after the days of the week, and what made each of the special (or doomed, as the case may be!) The characters in this book are interesting. Still, at the heart of Enchanted is the love story of Sunday and her frog prince. So many obstacles are arrayed before them, deemed by fate and fairytale to keep them apart. When the characters do begin to take action, the last third of the book flew by right up to the HEA that only a true fairy tale can provide.Overall, this book was not as rich and satisfying for adults as other YA such as Daughter of Smoke and Bone, or Tempest: A Novel. However, it was enjoyable and a rare YA book that parents concerned about too many adult themes can give to their young teens without fear. 3.5 stars, recommended.
  • (3/5)
    While I loved the idea of this book (a tale set in a world of fairy tales, with a number of them intersecting), the reality is that the author got so caught up in the premise that she lost sight of the plot. Things are shoehorned in in awkward ways and leave loose ends hanging regularly. The main plot - the friendship of a girl and a frog which turns into the romance between a girl and a prince - is poorly handled and unconvincing. It's not unusual for love in fairy tales to happen in a matter of days, but this book steeped itself in enough other 'regular' emotions (there were some nice points on family especially) that it feels very, very odd. Worse, near the middle of the book the plot skitters off on a side path that could have been interesting, but ultimately ends up quite confusing. There were scenes I had to read three times, and I'm still not sure I was clear on what was going on in them. Overall, a great premise, an extremely mediocre execution.
  • (5/5)
    I do love my fairy-tale stories and when I come across a retelling of not one fairy-tale, but a few of my favorites all entwined into one book - it is a must read for me! And because of that, I am going to have high expectations for it - and I'm happy to say, Alethea Kontis delivered an exceptional and enticing whimsical tale that swept me off my feet! For me, this story flowed quickly and beautifully... I really enjoyed the way Kontis was able to string so many fairy-tales together... The Frog Prince, Cinderella, Little Red Riding Hood, Peter Pan, Jack and the Beanstalk... while keeping the story going with what I would traditionally expect - the lessons to be learned, unforgettable characters, good versus evil and the innocence of true love.I loved all of the characters, even the 'evil' ones, lol! Their descriptions and personalities all shined through enough to make them individually memorable - and that was so important being that there were so many to keep track of. I applaud Kontis for being able to pull this off.Sunday is the seventh daughter of a seventh daughter, which means, that she will possess great magical powers and destined for many good things. She is the youngest of 10 in the Woodcutter family, who loves to write stories, but limits herself to only writing about her family in fear of writing new stories that eventually come true... Sunday befriends Grumble, The Frog, and her three kisses turns him back into a man, Prince Rumbold. Unbeknownst to Sunday, the Prince returns home to gather his strength and creates a plan to meet Sunday again, and have her fall in love with him for his true self. And the quest begins with balls, fairy godmothers and dark magic.It does help if you are familiar with the more popular original tales. And even though the ending is somewhat predictable, it did not keep me from reading this book in one night.If you truly believe in fairy-tales, this is definitely a book for you!
  • (3/5)
    I, like my fellow reviewers, found this book to be a pastiche of fairy tales, with plots taken haphazardly from one and inserted into another. At times it felt as though the author had to meet some sort of allusion quota, or that I were playing a 'Name that Tale!' game. But unlike my fellow reviewers, I was not captivated by this novel. The premise is simple: girl meets frog, girl kisses frog, frog becomes prince, prince loves girl, girl rejects prince. The story just didn't get more complex than that.Robin McKinley has proven that it's possible to take a classic fairy story and give it mature, nuanced substance. I found the substance lacking in this novel. Too whimsical? Maybe. I like my fairy tales with a slightly darker edge. If, however, you're looking for a cute, mood lifting tale to occupy an afternoon, Enchanted may be just what you're looking for.
  • (5/5)
    Rating: 4.5 beautiful stars out of 5!Absolutely ADORABLE. Magical. Smile-inducing. And so incredibly sweet! This book is one of the many reasons why I love fairytales and their re-tellings so much! Enchanted may mention some of my favourite fairytales — from The Princess and the Frog to Cinderella to Jack and the Beanstalk and more! — but it's much more than just a re-telling of them all. Alethea Kontis weaves them perfectly into an original and surprisingly complex story that's her own, adding in a cast of fantastic characters that will steal your heart away. Sweet and caring and determined and clever, I adored Sunday from start to finish! Both she and Rumbold (my new favourite frog prince) warmed my heart repeatedly. I love how the very first time she kisses him as a frog, he doesn't change back right away. It was sweetly realistic.Some people may be turned off by the promise of insta-love (since this is a fairytale, after all), but the author managed to pull it off perfectly without making it feel like overwhelming devotion! And even if that instant spark does bother you at first, I promise that by the end of the book, you'll love them both too much to care. Beautiful, enchanting, and everything I could ever ask for, Enchanted is one of my favourite re-tellings of anything to date! Alethea Kontis, like Sunday, is a masterful storyteller, and you should definitely be prepared to smile when you pick up this book. :) BUY or BORROW?: An absolute MUST-have for anyone who likes (or just appreciates) fairytales at all, but even if you don't, I'd recommend this book anyways!
  • (4/5)
    This is the third in a series, with the romance having been set up in the previous books. Simon volunteers to marry Ariane to allow his friend, who had been betrothed to her, to marry the woman he loves (see Forbidden). While his friend and brother see it as a sacrifice, as Ariane is melancholy and repeated states she wants nothing to do with marriage, the truth is Simon as wanted her since he first saw her. The problem is Ariane is petrified of marriage because, before the book started, she was drugged and raped, and then condemned by her father.All and all, it was well handled. Ariane’s shame and lack of trust was reasonable, as was her reaction to Simon’s physical attentions. There was enough keeping Simon and Ariane apart, most of which would work out fine if they would just talk.The “learned cloth” that made up Ariane’s wedding dress, which she wears a lot, was a little much for me at points. A strip was taken off the bottom, but it was never shorter. It was cut in the side, but it wasn’t ruined, the cut in the cloth just disappeared as far as I could tell. It was explained as being magical, but still. It didn’t throw me from the story, but I did roll my eyes a few times.
  • (3/5)
    This fantastical romance set during the reign of Henry I in England/Scotland showcased a strong pair of lovers who must overcome misunderstandings to find true love. Ariane is forced into a marriage with Simon--but because of her past she is deathly afraid of the wedding bed. Simon fortunately is not the type to force himself on her--but neither does he treat her with the tenderness she needs. Will these two come together--and will the magic in Ariane's clothes and the land around them help them?Good solid romance with plenty of tension, and an interesting landscape with a touch of fantasy. If thst's what you like, read it.