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If the Shoe Fits: Whatever After, Book 2

If the Shoe Fits: Whatever After, Book 2

Written by Sarah Mlynowski

Narrated by Emily Eiden


If the Shoe Fits: Whatever After, Book 2

Written by Sarah Mlynowski

Narrated by Emily Eiden

ratings:
4.5/5 (59 ratings)
Length:
3 hours
Released:
Apr 1, 2014
ISBN:
9780545655767
Format:
Audiobook

Description

This second book in Sarah Mlynowski's charming new series puts a fresh spin on the Cinderella story!

Once upon a time my brother and I found a magic mirror.

Tonight the mirror swept us into Cinderella's fairy tale. Now, we are NOT messing this story up. No way. Cinderella is going to marry her prince just like she's supposed to.

Uh-oh.

Cinderella broke her foot and there's massive swelling. The glass slipper won't fit, the prince won't know she's the one for him, and they won't live happily ever after. And it's all our fault!

To save the day we'll need to:

  1. 1. Learn how to use a dustpan
  2. Stay out of jail
  3. Find Cinderella a job
  4. And make sure true love finds its way.

We just have to get it all done before the clock strikes twelve and the chance for a happy ending is gone...forever!

Released:
Apr 1, 2014
ISBN:
9780545655767
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Sarah Mlynowski is the bestselling author of Ten Things We Did (and Probably Shouldn’t Have); I See London, I See France; Don’t Even Think About It; Think Twice; Milkrun; Fishbowl; Bras & Broomsticks; the Whatever After series; and more. Her books have been translated into twenty-nine languages and optioned to Hollywood. Sarah was born in Montreal but now lives and writes in New York City. Visit her at www.sarahm.com and find her everywhere @sarahmlynowski.


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Reviews

What people think about If the Shoe Fits

4.5
59 ratings / 11 Reviews
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Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    Girls who aren’t really over Cinderella and other fairy tales but don’t want to admit it can happily read the Whatever After series without being embarrassed. Abby and her younger brother Jonah discover a magic mirror in their new house, and in this story it takes them to Floom and the ball where Cinderella and her prince meet. Abby’s thrilled to see it all in real life, but she and Jonah manage to change the story when they startle Cinderella, who injures her foot dropping the glass slipper on it. When her Fairy Godmother is summoned to fix things, she says she’ll do it only after Cinderella becomes more proactive. After a few false starts they realize that Cinderella can start a business with her baking skills. The book ends happily ever after even though Cinderella doesn’t end up marrying the prince! Just enough sass to make readers feel grown up, enough fairy tale to satisfy the little girl in them, and enough of an empowerment message to help them navigate growing up today.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (2/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    I was so excited when I first heard about this series I was so excited. I love fairy tales and I had really liked other books by Mlynowski so I was pretty much sold on it...unfortunately I didn't really enjoy the book as much as I wanted to. I found Abby's attitude extremely obnoxious--to the point where I actually stopped reading for a while and debated whether it was worth finishing it. In the end b/c it was so short I did read the whole thing. I felt like there was some misinformation on what a judge's job actually is--the text seemed to me to imply that judge's decide the outcomes of cases. I did like the information provided on wills and how that played out as part of the outcome. The ending was also extremely abrupt. I understand that this is part of a series but I felt like there was a better way to go about the ending so that it would feel more finished. I don't think I'm going to continue with the series.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    What a unique and different book! I loved how the story was nothing like I expected! The main character is a witty intellectual young girl. The ending was also a big twist! I love the humor and the changes the author made and how it is not the same o Disney story. This book gives women power something that fairy tales tend to leave out.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (4/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    This was a fun adventure for two new kids and I cant wait to read the next book! Who knows what kind of trouble with fairytales they will get into next!

    1 person found this helpful

  • (5/5)

    1 person found this helpful

    The Fairest of All is the first book in a chapter book series titled Whatever After. Having read only this book, I can't vouch for the entire series but I was very impressed with this one.The Fairest of All involves a tween girl named Abby getting inadvertently sucked into a fairy tale world alongside her younger brother, the 7-year-old Jonah. Before they realize what's going on, the siblings end up discouraging Snow White from eating the poisoned apple from her evil stepmother. At first they congratulate themselves on saving Snow's life but then they realize it means she will never meet Prince Charming and fall in love with him. The brother and sister decide they must right the story and give Snow her "happily ever after."What I really appreciated about this book was how much of a feminist message it brought across while being entirely entertaining and not at all preachy. Abby is a great role model for young kids. When the book starts out in the real world, she is a bit out of sorts being the new kid in town but she's trying to make it work. She looks out for her younger brother and is determined to make sure he's safe, no matter what. Having two lawyers for parents, she knows enough about the practice of law that she's already decided she wants to be a judge when she's older. For Abby, fairness and justice are two of the most important things in life and her time in the fairy tale world is all about making sure Snow White gets a fair shake. Abby also likes to make plans with achievable goals to get herself out of sticky situations rather than just sitting around waiting for someone else to save the day. Snow White herself is re-imagined rather differently here. At first she seems like the same rather vapid princess from the story tale lore, but she soon starts showing agency and action. The trio of Snow, Abby, and Jonah quickly find that sitting around waiting for "my prince to come" is very dull and decide to take a series of initiatives to remedy the situation. By the end of the book, Snow storms the castle - with a little help from Abby, Jonah, and a law book - to wrest the monarchy away from her evil stepmother and rescue the prince from the dungeon. While it does star a girl as the main character and narrator, I think the book has enough adventure and humor to engage young boys as well as girls, if they (and their parents) could get past the partially hot pink cover. I certainly found it a welcome change from all the super "girly girl" princess books with little to recommend them by way of decent role models and empowering themes, let alone compelling stories filled with humor. I highly recommend this book for kids ages 8-12.

    1 person found this helpful

  • (3/5)
    I read this book at the request of third grade girls, who think the "Whatever After" series is the cat's pajamas. They were right. It is a good twist on fairy tales. 10 year old Abby and her 7 year old brother, Jonah find themselves transported to Snow White's world when they discover a magic mirror in the basement of their new home. As Abby tries to improve Snow's life and get the prince to marry Snow, she finds that interfering in a fairy tale doesn't always bring the consequences wanted.
  • (4/5)
    I read Ten Things We Did (and Probably Shouldn’t Have) by Sarah Mlynowski early last year. It wasn’t the greatest book, but I liked it. When I saw that she had a children’s book out, I thought it looked cute. Then my 9-year-old niece got it, and I asked if I could borrow it.

    Fairest of All is a retelling of Snow White’s story, and it was really cute. It was a super quick read (170 pages in under 2 hours!), but it was fun, too!

    The book is told from Abby’s perspective, a 10-year-old girl with aspirations of being a judge when she grows up. She’s the most responsible, and probably smartest, 10-year-old I’ve ever “known”.

    I watched the Disney version of Snow White not that long ago, and I certainly didn’t love it as much as I did when I was a kid. She’s too prim, her voice is too high, and it’s just kind of boring. But Sarah Mlynowski reinvents the story in a totally believable, 2000′s kind of way. I definitely found it more interesting, and the twist at the end was great!

    In short, I would highly recommend this book for anyone who has ever liked fairy tales, especially Snow White. I can’t wait to read the next book in the series!
  • (5/5)
    Is there a none audio version
  • (4/5)
    The Good Stuff Charming and sweet Reminded me of some of Meg Cabot's middle grade Perfect for the reluctant reader Loved the humour, quirky and fun (very Canadian) It was refreshing to read a novel geared towards young girls that was sweet and innocent. It was the sort of thing I would have loved to read at that age. I know quite a few customers at my store that will enjoy this one - sold a copy of it last week to this sweet little girl - she read the first page and said mom we have to buy this Great opening paragraph - will hook the reader in right away - also made me giggle and I am 42 Nice twist on the fractured fairy tale genre good role model for young girlsThe Not So Good Stuff Would have liked a little more development but hey this is written for a young girl not an old momFavorite Quotes/Passages"Maybe in Smithville a room filled with books is called a media room, but it smells just like the libray in my old, normal school. Musty. Dusty. Papery.""My whole body tenses. I do not like hissing. Especially hissing mirrors.""That's not the real story. That's the Disney version."Who Should/Shouldn't Read Perfect for the reluctant reader Fans of Meg Cabot's MG stuff will enjoy4 Dewey's I received this from Scholastic in exchange for an honest review
  • (4/5)
    When no-nonsense fifth-grader Abby and her little brother Jonah are sucked into the ornate mirror in their basement, they find themselves in the world of fairy tales. They soon stumble across a quaint cottage, just in time to stop a young woman from taking a poisoned apple from an old witch. But what they don't realize at the time is that, by changing Snow White's story, they may have robbed her of her happy ending. Abby is determined to make it right, no matter what that entails -- which is how she, Jonah, and Snow White end up hanging out with the seven dwarfs, climbing trees to avoid Prince Charming, and sneaking around the evil witch's castle. Will they be able to fix Snow White's story . . . and still make it home before their parents start to worry?This was a cute enough story, but it never really engaged me. I think it's one of those children's books best left to actual children. I'll recommend it to them, but adults looking for fairy tale retellings should probably look elsewhere.
  • (4/5)
    I received this book through the Goodread's First Read giveaways in exchange for my honest opinion.I might be 23, but I completely adored this book. It gives that feeling of wanting to squish a baby’s chubby cheeks. (I know I am weird, you don’t have to tell me.) I would recommend this book to really anyone of any age. If you have kids or grandkids it would be a great book to read with them, especially if they love fairytales. This book was creative and an innovative retelling of Snow White. It was the kind of book you wished you could be swept up in and go along with the characters in their adventures. I thought it was interesting how they story twisted and turned to make it original. There are things even I didn’t expect.It is amazing how driven Abby’s character is in the story. When I was in fifth grade I had no idea what I wanted to be. All I cared about was summer camp and dance classes. Abby has almost this O.C.D. about everything. She loves to makes lists and has everything organized and detailed. She is very set in her way, even when it comes to peanut butter and banana sandwiches. Her brother is just this goofy character. I mean he eats everything with ketchup and I do mean everything. I loved that while Abby was this decisive character, Johan is carefree and worries about the consequences later. Johan’s energy and imagination are infectious and it really lifted the book up.I am not sure if I agree with how Snow White acted towards the prince. One second she is being shy and the next being demanding of how she wants her story to end. She acts empowered by the end of the book and I believe it would be a good thing for girls to look up to. You don’t see the dwarfs as much in the books as I would have liked. They are great secondary characters to the book though and you do get a certain surprise that pertains to them. I want a Gabrielle, Gabrielle. I can’t say who she is, but you should read the book and find out. This book had me laughing out loud and completely entranced. I stayed up late just to finish it and sighed in content with the ending. If only I had a mirror to get “slurped” up in and be taken to different fairytale stories. I will definitely read the rest of the series to see what happens next in Abby’s and Johan’s adventures.