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Panic

Panic

Written by Lauren Oliver

Narrated by Sarah Drew


Panic

Written by Lauren Oliver

Narrated by Sarah Drew

ratings:
3/5 (370 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Mar 4, 2014
ISBN:
9780062299840
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as ebookEbook

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Description

Panic began as so many things do in Carp, a poor town of twelve thousand people in the middle of nowhere: because it was summer, and there was nothing else to do.

Heather never thought she would compete in panic, a legendary game played by graduating seniors, where the stakes are high and the payoff is even higher. She'd never thought of herself as fearless, the kind of person who would fight to stand out. But when she finds something, and someone, to fight for, she will discover that she is braver than she ever thought.

Dodge has never been afraid of panic. His secret will fuel him, and get him all the way through the game; he's sure of it. But what he doesn't know is that he's not the only one with a secret. Everyone has something to play for.

For Heather and Dodge, the game will bring new alliances, unexpected revelations, and the possibility of first love for each of them — and the knowledge that sometimes the very things we fear are those we need the most.

In this gritty, spellbinding novel, New York Times bestselling author Lauren Oliver delivers a gripping narrative of friendship, courage, survival, and hope.

A HarperAudio production.

Publisher:
Released:
Mar 4, 2014
ISBN:
9780062299840
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

Lauren Oliver is the cofounder of media and content development company Glasstown Entertainment, where she serves as the President of Production. She is also the New York Times bestselling author of the YA novels Replica, Vanishing Girls, Panic, and the Delirium trilogy: Delirium, Pandemonium, and Requiem, which have been translated into more than thirty languages. The film rights to both Replica and Lauren's bestselling first novel, Before I Fall, were acquired by Awesomeness Films. Before I Fall was adapted into a major motion picture starring Zoey Deutch. It debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in 2017, garnering a wide release from Open Road Films that year. Oliver is a 2012 E. B. White Read-Aloud Award nominee for her middle-grade novel Liesl & Po, as well as author of the middle-grade fantasy novel The Spindlers and The Curiosity House series, co-written with H.C. Chester. She has written one novel for adults, Rooms. Oliver co-founded Glasstown Entertainment with poet and author Lexa Hillyer. Since 2010, the company has developed and sold more than fifty-five novels for adults, young adults, and middle-grade readers. Some of its recent titles include the New York Times bestseller Everless, by Sara Holland; the critically acclaimed Bonfire, authored by the actress Krysten Ritter; and The Hunger by Alma Katsu, which received multiple starred reviews and was praised by Stephen King as “disturbing, hard to put down” and “not recommended…after dark.” Oliver is a narrative consultant for Illumination Entertainment and is writing features and TV shows for a number of production companies and studios. Oliver received an academic scholarship to the University of Chicago, where she was elected Phi Beta Kappa. She received a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from New York University. www.laurenoliverbooks.com.


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Reviews

What people think about Panic

3.2
370 ratings / 45 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    I was spoiled by reading Lauren Oliver’s previous books. I first red Before I Fall then I read the Delirium Trilogy, and I fell in love with all four books and with Miss Oliver herself. Her writing style flowed well, the story lines and plots were interesting, and the characters were relatable. Panic, however, did not live up to my expectations. Panic centers around high school seniors in a small town named Carp. The seniors graduated and the summer after graduation any senior is allowed to compete in the game, in ‘Panic.’ Sounded like an interesting concept when I first heard of the book, but it was a letdown.

    The two main characters are Heather and Dodge who both have their own personal reasons for competing in Panic. For Dodge playing Panic was for revenge. His older sister competed in the game and in the last challenge, the joust, she was paralyzed. Dodge decides a brother for a sister, and wants the little brother to pay for what his older brother did. I love the story line of revenge and how it eats up a person. Dodge was full of grief at what happened to his sister and what she couldn't do that he stopped seeing his sister. I love his character at first but I didn't think he actually had any development throughout the story. Dodge is not the one who decides to not exact his revenge; Heather and her best friend stopped him. Dodge was filled with revenge that the idea of not completing the game angered him, even when his sister tried to stop him.

    Heather entered the game on a whim after seeing her (ex)-boyfriend kiss another girl. She continues to compete for her little sister, Lily, and to get out of Carp. Heather’s home life was atrocious. Her mother has different men in and out of her life and is a drug addict. Through certain events that happen during the book it looks like Heather is going to start to pursue custody of Lily. Heather’s character was much more appealing to me than Dodge’s. Oliver wrote the book going back and forth between Heather and Dodge, and Heather’s chapters were the ones I wanted to read.

    Overall, though, the book was a disappointment. I kept reading because of my love of Oliver’s previous books and with the hope that it would get better. The story line and plot ended up being boring for myself. And I know in the first few pages it says Panic was created out of boredom but I was still hoping for a reveal of why at the end. However, the pace of the book made it a quick read and never truly slows down. But I would recommend one of Oliver’s other books before this one.

    2.5/5
  • (4/5)
    This is the first Lauren Oliver book that I really liked. Panic is a game that has been created for senior students about to graduate from high school in the small, rural town of Carp. The challenges are risky, scary and increasingly dangerous, where accidents and death occur. The chapters alternate between Heather and Dodge, two competitors in this year's Panic. Although I usually like alternating points of view, I didn't like how the chapters were told in the third person, and Dodge seemed more like a secondary character than a main protagonist. However, despite some gaps in the plot, "Panic" moved along at a fast pace, with more and more secrets being revealed along the way, which made for a surprisingly entertaining read.
  • (4/5)
    Carp is a small town where there's not much to do, so the high school students made up a game called Panic. Everyone pays in, but only the seniors compete the summer after graduation. There's always at least $50,000 at stake, but each round of the game has higher and higher risks. It starts with everyone competing jumping off of a cliff into the water below, and ends with two cars facing off in a round of chicken. Everything in between is made up by two unknown judges. Heather and her best friend Natalie are competing for the money, but Dodge, who quickly becomes their friend, is more interested in revenge. Very suspenseful story, and I'm excited to hear that it's already been optioned for a movie. I think it's going to be a great, action-packed film.
  • (3/5)
    I liked this book. It had a lot of good sub-plots and i liked the way the relationships developed between the charaters.
  • (2/5)
    Ok, I'm officially taking a break from young adult books for a while. While this was a pretty good listening candy while on long bike rides, just not what I want to be feeding into my head. Recent high school graduates choose to take part in a game of "Panic" involving dangerous stunts that become ever more stupid in order to win a pot of money collected throughout the year from all seniors ($67K). Typical teenage relationships and peer pressure.
  • (3/5)
    Interesting, but I felt like I was watching a train wreck the whole way through. Yes, the protagonists (mostly) come out of it okay, but the book is about the subtle forces destroying a community, individual by individual.
  • (5/5)
    Okay, I'm just going to start by saying that this is by far my favourite summer read so far! I loved this book. I could not put it down.The story is told from the point of view of Heather and Dodge (although Heather is definitely the main character). They are acquaintances, joined together by a dangerous, high stakes game called "Panic".The pacing in this book was excellent. It is on par with Oliver's other works (Delirium and Before I Fall being my favourites). There is tons of adventure and danger, a bit of romance, a splash of mystery and a lot of true angst.I fell in love with the main character, Heather, and her struggles with a difficult home life, the adjustments a new high school graduate makes and her changing relationship with her best friend, Bishop.It's hard for me not slip into spoilers with this book, so I'm just going to say: READ IT!
  • (3/5)
    3.5 stars. I'm going to review it on my 11th House Blog and will elaborate more when I do.

    It was fast-paced, engaging, and had a edge-o-seat premise. There were a few gaps in editing with repeated words and phrases, and a few plot-stoppers for me, but overall a good book and an insightful read.
  • (3/5)
    Not bad. Not as good as her other, but not bad.
  • (4/5)
    Panic was a thrilling and tense book filled with high stakes and danger. It was a bit like Fear Factor, but with life-or-death tasks and much more at stake than just money. THE THEMESDesperation, greed, and courage were what the biggest themes revolved around. In order to play Panic, the characters had to dig deep for every bit of courage they could spare--they needed it to not just get through the challenges but to forward in life. In the meantime, they all had to deal with the greed they felt for the prize for winning the game (money, a better future, etc.). They all did things out of desperation to win the game or get further in life. There were many other focuses and themes in Panic, but those were the ones that stood out the most to me.THE GAME OF PANICI simply loved the game! I've never seen one like it. At first, I was puzzled over what the point of it was and how it worked, but once I figured it out, the game proved to be very dangerous and exciting. It kept me on my toes--the challenges the characters felt were pretty scary, so I was constantly worried over what would happen to them. The game and its progression from one dangerous task the next, even more dangerous one was the best part of the book for me. It added a lot of excitement to the story, as well as some different twists than I was expecting.HEATHERShe definitely changed over the course of the story, and since character growth is one of my favorite things to see in a book, that stood out to me. Through pushing determinedly through the high risk tasks, she had to muster up much more courage than she ever had. She had to strip away her weakness and start seeing things in a new light in order to win Panic. The main reason for her competing in the game was to give her chance to grow. I loved how the game helped her do that.OVERALLThe minute I discovered this book, I knew it would be a good read for me. And I was right. Panic was my type of book. It was a contemporary with great themes, exciting events, and character growth--some of my favorite things. The game, too, was something that I absolutely love to find in books: a level of freshness. The tasks each player were given made the book feel quite different. Panic was a great read that I already know that I want to reread sometime. If you are looking for an exciting contemporary and haven't given this one a try yet, I suggest doing so. You may enjoy it as much as I did!*I received an e-arc of this book from the publisher through Edelweiss in return for an honest review.
  • (2/5)
    Ok, I'm officially taking a break from young adult books for a while. While this was a pretty good listening candy while on long bike rides, just not what I want to be feeding into my head. Recent high school graduates choose to take part in a game of "Panic" involving dangerous stunts that become ever more stupid in order to win a pot of money collected throughout the year from all seniors ($67K). Typical teenage relationships and peer pressure.
  • (4/5)
    Panic is a secret game that pits player against player in mental and physical challenges designed to push them to the breaking point. Heather Nill never planned or dreamed that she would play...but felling she had nothing to loose and everything to gain... she’s in. Nothing is going to keep her from walking away with enough money to get away from this small town with an evil at it's heart. Impossible to think that anyone or anything could even conceive of a game like this. The story grabs you early on, and even though all the time you think.."how ridiculous this is that anyone would even do this for any amount of money"...you find you are caught up in the game until the very last page.
  • (3/5)
    Im really not impressed. When you have read truly good literature that we have access today, its disturbing what the youth in our nation attract to. Pointless narcissism. Ok Hunger games was written, Twilight was written....oh lets combine the two and center it on neurotic kids. Brilliant. Oh as long as we throw in as many cuss words as your latest skateboarding millenial politician says in his sound bite the masses will love it. Sigh my professor was right. He blamed it on texting and stated the younger generations are doomed. Reading through this crap Ill say ,indeed sir, .
  • (4/5)
    Heather and her friends join in Panic, the annual game, at the end of their senior year. Friendships and love are found while competing to win a lot of money.
  • (4/5)
    Panic by Lauren Oliver is a tense novel and overcoming fear in order to take home $67,000.The setting is in Carp, NY, and everyone is desperate. Desperate to get out. So desperate they will risk their lives. After graduation, seniors are required to put money in the pot and anyone can participate in the game Panic in order to win the money. It begins with jumping off a cliff into water. Heather has no intention of participating; but, when her boyfriend dumps her, she finds himself jumping. Throughout the summer, Heather, Bishop, Nat, and Dodge navigate the increasingly dangerous game while trying to elude the police who want to stop it. If anyone gives the police information, he/she is severely punished. In this atmosphere of desperation, lying may be the only way to survive.Heather loves her little sister and wants out of Carp because her mother is a drunk drug addict; Nat wants a career as an actress or model and is willing to do whatever it takes; Bishop is heading to college and only wants Heather safe; and, Dodge wants revenge for his sister's accident in Panic a few years ago that left her paralyzed. Only one person can win, so how can these four help each other yet be the last one standing with the money?This novel has mature content. These are kids from difficult lives who use coarse language because they see it at home and school. I think this will be a popular book because it's intense--almost too intense. The characters are their own worst enemies and then they each have their own secrets. The suspense comes in whether their secrets can be revealed before someone dies. There are death-defying challenges, tigers, tense relationships, and desperation to hook you in.
  • (4/5)
    Really lovely. Better than the Delirium series, not as good as Before I Fall.

    Review to come!
  • (4/5)
    Thanks to Edelweiss for access to this title.

    Another original story from Oliver. The entire premise was interesting. A small town, a big challenge, and winner's pot worth enough to take that winner away and kick-start their dreams. All with the chance of dismemberment or death. I think fans of the author will really enjoy this new story.
  • (4/5)
    Nobody believed that Panic would stop, of course. The game must go on. The game always went on.I have read all of Lauren Oliver's previous work and enjoyed them so when this book came out I knew I was going to add it to my tbr pile. This book mainly follows two teenagers (Heather and Dodge) living in small town Carp, New York. For the past fear years after graduation the seniors take place in a game called Panic. The game is very dangerous at times and people have died or been seriously injured while playing it. The risk may be great but so is the reward as the pot this year is $67,000. Money isn't the sole motivation for everyone playing the game, sometimes a person's motivation is more sinister than that.I felt like Heather and Dodge were great main characters for this book. Both have their hardships and both have different reasons for playing Panic. I connected a bit more with Heather because I felt like Dodge was a bit too annoying and naive at times. Both Heather and Dodge become close to Heather's best friends (Nat and Bishop) during the game but Panic, as it usually does, threatens to tear their bonds apart.I have a few problems with this book. My first problem with it was that the major twists in the book were obvious from pretty early on in the book. I'm not even sure you could really call it a twist since it was so obvious. Also how in the hell were these kids able to raise $67,000? It briefly explains how they got the pot but quite honestly it seemed like with the amount of people in their graduating class that $67,000 is completely unrealistic. If Panic is such a dangerous game then how come the parents and police didn't shut it down? The police tried a bit but it just seemed like they were stumbling around. I can't believe that a dangerous game where people have been killed would have been allowed to continue on.While I did enjoy this and read it really fast I still had my doubts about the plausibility of some of the plot. If you've liked Lauren Oliver's previous work then you will enjoy this book.
  • (5/5)
    I've been a fan of Lauren Oliver for a few years now, first with Before I Fall and then with Delirium series and when I heard about Panic I was pretty excited. Sure the cover though beautiful doesn't give much away, sure its suppose to be a dystopian book but there's absolutely nothing futuristic about it, but it was still a good book. I heard one person compare it to The Hunger Games , I'm not exactly sure why they think thank as its nothing like it, if anything it reminds me strongly of The Scorpio Races which seen as I loved that book (and massively wish it was a series) it is nothing but a good thing.The book is set from two peoples point of views, Heather a strong minded girl who's had a hard life with a great group of friends and Dodge, a loner with a hard life of his own. Both have their own reason's for entering Panic, both desperate to win to make a better life for their sisters. Heather is a very timid girl at first, but with the help of Panic and determination she really comes out of her shell and we see that she isn't as scared as we and she thinks. Dodge is a stranger character, at first he comes across as shy from his obviously lack of social interaction, but then when we get further into the book it becomes apparent that his intentions might not be as innocent as we once thought.We also have two other sub characters who are just as important. Natalie and Bishop, Heathers best friends. Natalie is also in Panic, for nothing other than the money. she seems pretty hell bent on being famous and escaping Carp. Bishop is always there for Heather, and is pretty much one of my favourite characters. All of them, no matter how big or small, together or a mess are brilliant. The thing I love about Lauren Oliver is that she puts so much effort into building up her characters from the ones who are just in it for a chapter to the main ones.The more the story goes on, the harder the game gets. Sometimes through it my heart was in my throat or I was very on edge, sometimes it dragged (very little) but I loved the development of the characters and the relationships, I love how for the most of it I never knew what was going to happen. I loved the originality of the idea. I really just liked the book in general. It had its ups and downs, like every book, but overall it was a really good book and I'm glad I read it :)
  • (2/5)
    The plot is interesting; almost an entire graduating senior year is involved in dares, hoping to win the big payoff. The goal is to be the last person who refuses to back down from one of the dares. The problem is that some of those dares are resulting in deaths, and it is no longer harmless fun. Thrilling and original.Having said that, it won't be on my middle school shelves; too mature. I'll be sending it along to my high school.
  • (4/5)
    This book started off slow for me. I tried starting it a few times and couldn't get into it. Once I finally sat down and forced myself to read past the first few chapters I was hooked. I couldn't wait to see what the Judges would think of next, and ultimately who would win Panic.
  • (4/5)
    In her boring upstate New York town, Panic is the big deal for graduating seniors. The summer after they graduate, those brave enough engage in a series of challenges determined by anonymous judges. The winner walks away with a pot of money big enough to escape their town.
  • (3/5)
    The concept of the game itself began well but ended with a fizzle, and the super surprise judge was no surprise at all. Not up to her usual standard here.
  • (4/5)
    Panic was a pleasant surprise for me, I loved the storyline. I was intrigued by the mysteriousness of the game, imagining what kinds of challenges they would have to do and who the judges were. All of the participants had different motives as well, which all played their part in how the game turned out. Definitely kept me intrigued. Unfortunately this is a stand alone novel, but I look forward to more novels by Lauren Oliver. She never disappoints me!
  • (3/5)
    I really liked this book more than I thought I would. It got some extra bonus points for not being in first person. Certain details on the game Panic does have me a little confused, but I guess I could overlook them enough to enjoy the story. I haven't read anything by Lauren Owen before, so this book helped me discover her. I did feel, though, that I didn't exactly get much closure on Dodge's perspective.
  • (5/5)
    I love Lauren Oliver's books, so it didn't surprise me how much I enjoyed PANIC. The challenge feels real, desperate, and quirky, and I fell in love with Heather and Dodge from the first few sentences in each of their alternating POVs. The author has a gift for making you feel for her characters and leaving the reader haunted. This book is no exception. And the end? Read it. That's all I'm saying.
  • (5/5)
    In the poor town of Carp, New York, a group of teens enters a high-stakes game that involves a series of secretive, possibly deadly challenges throughout the summer, with the winner receiving more than $50,000--enough money to start a new life.
  • (4/5)
    PANIC takes place in Carp, New York - a depressed town with little employment. Panic is a game that the seniors play. It involves secrecy, challenges, and possibly even death. However, the pot this year is $67,000.Heather Nill wasn't going to play but her boyfriend broke up with her by flaunting his new girl right before the opening event. Dodge Mason was always going to play. He didn't want the money but he wanted revenge. His sister wound up second and paralyzed from the waist down at the conclusion of the game when she was a senior. Dodge wants to get the younger brother of the guy who won and hurt him as his family had been hurt. Heather's friend Nat is playing but her best friend Bishop isn't. In fact, he tries to convince her not to take part. Events run from jumping from a cliff into the quarry swimming hole, to crossing a plank from one water tower to another, to spending a night in a haunted house, and playing Russian roulette. All of those events are tests for Heather who has enough stress in her life already. She is reconciling herself to the fact that Bishop is going away to college in the Fall. She also has to protect her younger sister from their alcohol and drug-addicted mother. But one thing Panic does is test everyone to their limits and beyond. Heather and Dodge are going to find out just what they will do to win the game and who they will be when it is over. I can't say that I enjoyed the story but I was involved in it. I hated the situations that Heather found herself in. I hated that she didn't have supportive parents. I hated that she felt so unhappy and so locked into life in Carp. I hated Dodge's situation too. Living on the idea of revenge isn't the best way to live. His changing relationship with his sister is adding more stress to an already stressful situation. I really disliked Nat for most of the story but could understand what was fueling her bad choices.This was a powerful story and well-written. I felt a sigh of relief at the hopeful ending.
  • (3/5)
    Read on December 26, 2013While reading this book I had flashbacks to my Christopher Pike and R.L. Stine reading days. No idea why...it's been years (maybe even a couple of decades) since I read either author. Maybe it was the game itself (or the vast group of teenagers making really bad decisions). Panic tests to see how much fear you can handle and even despite fear, how long you can last in certain situations. It's not a game for the faint of heart. That part of the book was interesting -- seeing the tests these characters are put through. I also generally liked the characters. I could relate to being the tall girl that wears flats and slouches so she doesn't look like a giant next to her friends. In fact, the thing that bothered me most about this book was kind of silly and is probably me being a little nit-picky. Carp is a town of 12,000 with a graduating class of around 100 -- it has a BUS SYSTEM?! I grew up in Florida so maybe I'm incorrect in thinking that bus systems are only in large, more urban areas, but a town that small with public transit? Is there a county system that covers this in upstate New York?AND she forgave Bishop?! Seriously? And the kidnapping of Dodge? Too much.I had more thoughts as I was drifting off to sleep last night about other things I found a little too absurd, but now I've forgotten. Bottom line: It doesn't have all the feels of Before I Fall, which is kind of what I was expecting. But it's a good read, just not Oliver's best.
  • (4/5)
    I wanted to read Panic because I enjoyed Lauren Oliver's other contemporary and even though this one sounds different, I liked the direction it was going in. The idea of this big game and stunts, and where these two characters could face such things and possibly fall in love along the way intrigued me. Which I have to say, when reading the synopsis I almost thought that there was a supernatural or dystopian element to the story, but I think that it makes it more realistic, and it is set that it could happen in real life and it wasn't really forced on the kids, but more like a town tradition. I liked both of the main characters, Heather and Dodge. They had secrets, and reasons why they were entering the games, on why they needed the money. Both of their families have their own backstories and play into the reasons they are playing and want to win. They are both sisters as well, and I loved the individual bonds, and how they grew and changed through the story. The games though really shocked me. What they planned and the extremely dangerous element to them. They went over the previous years' deaths and that made me think that there was an even higher risk to this year's game. I think that these types of stunts though are def not out of character of a small town summer with nothing for the teens to do. I do think that the planning system and that everyone pays into the pot is kinda unrealistic, but I went with it for the sake of the story. It was def high adventure and had me scared for what my characters might face next as the group of players gets smaller and smaller. It had me glued to the pages, and I read it quickly, but I don't think this will be one that sticks with me and I think about after, hence the 3.5 I think that Heather really grew and learned a lot through the games as well as through the things that she had to deal with at home. I love the side plot with the lady she gets a job with Anne. Anne has a farm of sorts and rescues animals and hires Heather to help her. The bond that they form is special and I appreciated reading about it and how it developed. The ending worked out pretty well and matched what I expected from the book. It wrapped things up and even gave up a glimpse at the near future of the characters. Bottom Line: Fast paced and demanded my attention while reading.