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This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage

This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage

Written by Ann Patchett

Narrated by Ann Patchett


This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage

Written by Ann Patchett

Narrated by Ann Patchett

ratings:
4/5 (469 ratings)
Length:
11 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Nov 5, 2013
ISBN:
9780062282873
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as ebookEbook

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Editor's Note

The art of writing & living...

Ann Patchett has long been beloved for her novels, but this collection of essays confirms she’s just as deft in nonfiction. From the art of writing to the LAPD, her essays are at once deeply intimate and universally apt.

Description

Blending literature and memoir, Ann Patchett, author of State of Wonder and Bel Canto examines her deepest commitments: to writing, family, friends, dogs, books, and her husband in This is the Story of a Happy Marriage. Together these essays, previously published in The Atlantic, Harper's, Vogue, and the Washington Post, form a resonant portrait of a life lived with loyalty and with love.

This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage takes us into the very real world of Ann Patchett's life. Stretching from her childhood to the present day, from a disastrous early marriage to a later happy one, it covers a multitude of topics, including relationships with family and friends, and charts the hard work and joy of writing, and the unexpected thrill of opening a bookstore.

As she shares stories of the people, places, ideals, and art to which she has remained indelibly committed, Ann Patchett brings into focus the large experiences and small moments that have shaped her as a daughter, wife, and writer.

Publisher:
Released:
Nov 5, 2013
ISBN:
9780062282873
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as ebookEbook

About the author

Ann Patchett is originally from Los Angeles and is a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College. She is the author of four novels, The Patron Saint of Liars, The Magician’s Assistant, Taft and Bel Canto, which was the winner of the 2002 Pen/Faulkner Award. She lives in Nashville.



Reviews

What people think about This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage

4.1
469 ratings / 55 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    Didn't realize it was a book of short stories.
  • (5/5)
    Audiobook edition narrated by the authorAlthough this is a collection of essays from the 1990's to the early 201o's, it serves as a de-facto memoir / autobiography as the selection is based on personally-related stories by the author. The title essay which is an overview of Patchett's marriages and divorces was an Audible Original in 2011 which I recall was a free Audible Gift that year. I found this to be enormously entertaining, often humorous and heartbreaking in different parts. Patchett provides writing tips, tales of book tours, the story of the founding of her joint-owned bookstore Parnassus Books in Nashville, Tennessee, her love of her dog, her friends and her family. If you are not already a fan of her fiction you will likely want to read as much of it as you can get your hands on afterwards.
  • (4/5)
    A collection of personal essays from throughout Patchett's career, this book avoids being hit or miss, with every essay in it striking a chord with me. I did enjoy some of them more than others, of course, but the whole collection was wonderful. My favorites were "The Wall," about trying out for the LA police academy; "The Right to Read," an address to the Clemson freshman class of 2006 amid a brouhaha about one of Patchett's books; and "The Mercies," about Patchett's friendship with a nun. Recommended.
  • (4/5)
    A collection of essays (and a speech) that is Fine from beginning to end. I had only read Ann Patchett's second novel, Taft, before. Most of her fiction has not called to me, based on descriptions, and even enthusiastic reviews by readers I respect. HOWEVER, having read all these pieces, many of which spoke directly to my heart and soul, I know I have to trust Ann Patchett to tell me a good story, even if it isn't one that seems to be "my kind of thing" on the face of it. When she described her 7th grade self's brief but lovely encounter with Eudora Welty at a book signing, I found myself hugging the book, and there might have been a tear in my eye over her final observation about that: "For the sheer force of its heart-stopping, life-changing wonder, I will put this experience up against anyone who ever saw the Beatles." Also, she has forced --forced, I tell you--me to buy two books, a collection of Grace Paley's short stories, and the 2006 edition of Best American Short Stories, which Patchett edited and for which she wrote a wonderful introduction (included in This is the Story...October 2017
  • (5/5)
    After my experience with Patchett's Bel Canto and State of Wonder, I snatched this up at the library without knowing anything about it. Turns out to be a collection of short stories (some shorter than others). Now, short stories are not my thing - I like big books, I cannot lie - but the writing is so beautiful and honest, that I'm reconsidering that position. It's like eating a box of chocolates, and each little bonbon is not only your favorite, but impossibly even more delicious than the one before.
  • (5/5)
    These days, Ann Patchett is best known for her novels, but she began her writing career as a journalist, mastering the art of short non-fiction. This collection of essays, originally published in the New York Times, Atlantic Monthly, and other major media outlets, represents some of her finest work in the genre. These essays are highly personal, and collectively describe a life with all of its ups and downs. Patchett discusses her writing career, her romantic and family relationships, her dog, the decision to open a bookstore, and her friendship with Lucy Grealy (covered in depth in Patchett's memoir, Truth and Beauty). Many times, an essay took hold of me, prompting anything from nodding in agreement to outrage to tears. I couldn't possibly mention every one of these moments. One that stood out was her 2007 piece about her 2006 appearance at Clemson University. Truth and Beauty was assigned reading for the incoming freshman class, to the outrage of many parents and alumni who wrongly deemed it pornographic. Patchett endured their public shaming, and to its credit the university did not cancel their invitation for her to address the class. Her powerful address, "The Right to Read," follows her essay about these events. The final essay in this collection, "The Mercies," is about an aging nun and at first seemed out of place. But as I turned the final page, I realized it was a perfect way to end this book while leaving room for more books like this in the future.