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Peter Pan

Peter Pan

Written by J. M. Barrie

Narrated by Robert Rance


Peter Pan

Written by J. M. Barrie

Narrated by Robert Rance

ratings:
3.5/5 (121 ratings)
Length:
12 minutes
Released:
Jan 1, 2010
ISBN:
9781629689432
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

J.M. Barrie’s classic fantasy tale of the boy who would not grow up brings the fairies, mermaids, and lost boys to young readers. When Wendy, John, and Michael follow Peter Pan to the Neverland they encounter the lost boys, Indians, and Captain Hook and his pirates! The incredible adventures with Peter are retold in the Calico Illustrated Classics adaptation of Barrie’s Peter Pan. Calico Chapter Books is an imprint of Magic Wagon, a division of ABDO Group. Grades 3-8.
Released:
Jan 1, 2010
ISBN:
9781629689432
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook


About the author

J. M. Barrie (1860–1937) was a Scottish author best known for creating Peter Pan. Born in the small town of Kirriemuir, Barrie was the ninth of ten children. When he was six years old, his older brother David died just before turning fourteen. Both Barrie and his mother took comfort in the idea that David would remain a boy forever, never growing old. Barrie never had children of his own, but was the legal guardian of five brothers, known collectively as the Davies boys, who are widely recognized as the inspiration for the character of Peter Pan.

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Reviews

What people think about Peter Pan

3.7
121 ratings / 135 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    This was so fun to read, my introduction to Peter Pan was in 1955 when Mary Martin did the TV presentation. This follows what I remember of the TV performance as I remember it. It brought back so many nice memories.
  • (3/5)
    3.5

    This was better than I expected. The ending brought it all full circle. A nice little touching piece with the theme of childhood intertwining with the yarn.
  • (1/5)
    23 (re-read) Peter Pan or The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up, by J. M. Barrie. This was on Starrett's 1955 list of "books which will live", and I forgot to check my list of books read and so read it. It seemed so familiar, but I did not think I had actually read it. But I did--tho probably not in play form, as this was. It is so saccharine, I really cannot say as an adult it is worth reading. (read Aug. 8, 1998)
  • (4/5)
    Although the story was very familiar to me, I don’t recall ever reading the book before. I saw the Mary Martin version on TV as a child. It struck me this time around how odd the plot is, with everyone expecting Wendy to assume the role of mother to Peter and the Lost Boys. Things have changed in the century since this book was written. Infant and child mortality was a lot higher in the early 20th century than it is now. Women’s mortality from childbirth (or other causes) was also a lot higher then. Children who had lost their mothers, or who had friends or relations who had lost their mothers, might see themselves among the motherless children of Neverland. The story may not resonate with 21st century children in the same way, and that’s a good thing.
  • (5/5)
    Find this review and more at On The Shelf!I absolutely LOVE Tinkerbell, and I am ashamed to say I had never readPeter Panonly seen the Disney version, so I decided to change that and grabbed the audiobook from the library. I thought it was so good and I am glad I finally decided to read it. The language is much different from nowadays of course, but it was still really great. Well-written and very fun, Barrie created a marvelous story for kids and adults. The Neverland world is so creative and must have been such a pleasure for Barrie to write. A little bit of the humor slipped by me since it was written so long ago, but not much. I really enjoyed the reader as well, especially when he did the classic nasally Captain Hook voice we all know so well! The characters were really great as well. The lost boys were adorable and Peter was so stubborn. The only character I really didn’t care much for was the father because he was so incredibly whiny and at one point argued with the youngest child just like a little kid. I liked the way the story ended and I even saw a bunch of references from the movie Hook that I never knew were from the book. If you like classics, this is a must read book! Fun, well-written, wonderful classic, fast read, one for my library!
  • (4/5)
    I've always loved the story of Peter Pan and finally got around to reading the book. I think that it brought out the character of Peter more than I was used to and I really enjoyed that.
  • (4/5)
    I knew the basic story of Peter Pan; still, I was a little surprised at just how dark the book is. I loved the writing style, and the adventure and excitement, but the ending and Peter in general made me sad.I tried to read this with my 6-year-old, but had a hard time keeping his interest. He loved the illustrations and interactive elements of this gorgeous edition.
  • (2/5)
    Maybe I would have enjoyed this book more if I'd read it as a child, but as an adult I found it just annoyed me, tremendously, especially the character of Peter. I think this is one case in which the Disney adaption was better than the source. Seriously.
  • (3/5)
    About 50 years ago I saw the Broadway show starring Sandy Duncan as Peter Pan. It was much better than the book! 176 pages 3 stars
  • (4/5)
    Peter Pan by J.M. Barrie is the classical tale of Peter Pan that boy who could not grow up and his adventures in Neverland with Wendy, lost boys, Tinkerbell and Captain Hook. The book have beautiful illustration throughout and is written like a beginners chapter book The first chapters of Peter Pan begins with Peter Pan visiting Wendy, John and Michael Darling, later with Tinkerbell who help the children fly with the help of fairy dust to Neverland . In Neverland the children met the Lost Boys, the Natives and Captain Hook and set sail on a fun adventure. The theme of this book is childhood and imagination which is shown through the character Peter Pan.
  • (4/5)
    I was pleased with how close this is to the stage play (a favorite of my childhood). After Peter Pan in Kensington Park, I expected this to suck. Color me pleasantly surprised.
  • (4/5)
    I probably don't need to say much about this one, right? Classic vintage children's fare: a charismatic yet dangerous young main character, a small army of assorted children, lots of adventures, some dubious attitudes towards women and Native Americans, a dose of tongue-in-cheek humour and plenty of magic. I actually really enjoyed it!
  • (3/5)
    Everyone knows the story of Peter Pan. Like many, I had only seen the Disney version of the movie and never read the book. The bare bones of the story are the same. Peter Pan comes in through the open window of the Darling home one night and the three Darling children--Wendy, Michael, and John--fly off with him to Neverland. All of the characters are present--Tinker Bell, Captain Hook, Tiger Lily, the Lost Boys, Smee, and the crocodile.What surprised me the most was that the tone was much darker than the Disney movie. I purchased this book with the hope of having my 8 year old read it, but I think I'll wait until he's a little older. The reading level isn't difficult, but there is much more violence. Neverland is not a happy place, but a dangerous place where the Lost Boys are on constant alert so as to not be killed by the pirates, Indians, or wild animals.Peter is not as likable in the book. He is incredibly arrogant and selfish. That alone wouldn't bother me if it weren't for the fact that his cockiness put the lives of others in danger. Peter originally sought out Wendy so that the Lost Boys could have a mother. Peter was very self-centered and throughout the story you could tell that he didn't really care about Wendy. When she ultimately went home, he was just sad that he didn't have someone to clean up after him.Tinker Bell was another character I found to be quite different in the book. She was a nasty little thing with a sharp tongue.Barrie is an excellent story teller but Peter Pan wasn't as captivating as I'd hoped. I can see why it is a classic. I'm glad I read it, although I doubt that this is a book that I will revisit.
  • (4/5)
    I'd never read this book before and I don't think I've ever seen the panto or the whole of any of the films either, but of course I vaguely knew the plot from seeing various parts of the cartoon version on those Disney Time TV programs that used to be shown every bank holiday. It is a darker story than I was expecting; the fairies and mermaids are otherworldly and treacherous and Peter's forgetfulness makes him an unreliable and at times unnerving companion. He isn't really human at all any more - he spent too long with the fairies and that is never a good thing. Because Peter Pan refuses to grow up, he will remain 'gay and innocent and heartless' forever.
  • (4/5)
    The JM Barrie original bears only a passing resemblance to the 1953 Disney movie. Yes, all the characters are there, but what happens in the novel is much darker and deeper than the Disney-fied version. It is truly an examination of the inner child that refuses to grow up. We see both the good and the evil that dwells within the heart of man.
  • (5/5)
    Peter Pan As a boy I always wished to be Peter Pan. I never wanted to grow up to be an adult. I wanted to remain a child having not a care in the world. As time evolved I grew up and before I knew it I was not a child. Troubles of the world concerned me. As a child I had many memories of pretending to be Peter Pan. I use to watch all the Peter Pan movies and read all the children books. I've read Peter Pan many times. This is easily one of my favorite books and its truly for all ages. It not only has an outstanding story but brings back child hood memories and brings a special feeling to all of its readers. There are very few books that have caught my attention like this book. I would highly recommend this wonderful book to all and everyone.
  • (3/5)
    The first thing to strike me about this book was actually how violent it was! Somehow, I expected the violence to be as "play" as I've always believed it to be. Alas, when the pirates and indians fight, it is to the death. And Peter himself is quite the callous bastard! It really takes the whole level of "what if the violent games children play were made real" scenarios to a point you'd never see Disney go! :)It truly is a fascinating read, however, regardless of things like the "narrator" sometimes interrupting the flow of the story, or the vengefulness of Tinker Belle. There are still plot points I can see Disney make use of in future movies so JM Barrie's ideas will still be feeding future generations.
  • (4/5)
    Peter Pan is a tough sell these days, given the complexity of its language next to today's novels targetting the same age group. I tried to read it when I was a kid and set it aside, feeling vaguely lost and deterred; the Disney rendition was considerably easier to absorb. Now I tried again, as a bedtime story for my 7-yr-old son. What the author's driving at still went over our heads at times, but my son held on through every chapter and anticipated the next, even though I'm fairly sure he only fully absorbed half of them. Wendy's thrilling to the idea of children to care for, the source of Tinkerbell's jealousy and other story developments and narrator asides remind me of today's animated features where adult-oriented jokes are inserted to keep the grown-ups entertained. If only there weren't so much overwriting.One aspect that especially hasn't aged well is the "redskins", with their peculiar mix of native American and African American stereotypes of the novel's period. But my son didn't know those connections and I think viewed them as a race of entirely fantastical invention. The story remains a fun adventure for children, with its introducing the ability to fly (who doesn't want to do that?), a dog for a nanny, and a means of transport into one's own imagination where there's a new adventure every day with just the right mix of derring-do and danger, threats of blood-spilling and silly humour. We loved the medicine-taking episode, the captured shadow, the ticking crocodile, and many other fun ingredients. Of course we clapped for Tinkerbell, and the ending is magic for both kids and adults. I'm glad I returned to it, and he'll have fond memories.
  • (4/5)
    Very interestingly told; the narrative is something special. I had seen the movies, but never read the book, and the book is so good. A surprising amount of the book was represented in the 2003 Peter Pan film. One thing: I prefer the Peter Pan character I have seen in the movies. The Peter in the novel definitely has an unlikable side. Still, this makes him more realistic... Sorry, I'm a sucker for Jeremy Sumpter. :P
  • (3/5)
    This was a tough one to read aloud. I read the book, to myself, several years ago but didn't really remember it all. If I had, I don't think I would have chosen to read it aloud. The first few chapters were rather boring and very old-fashioned. Once Peter entered the picture, the story picked up and ds became interested. But then once again, the narrative would seem to just go on and on about nothing until something happened in the plot every once and a while. I found the writing very didactic, conceited and smug and just downright difficult to read out loud. I could just imagine the author chuckling at how witty he thought himself. I have to say the 7yo enjoyed this much more than I. I asked him twice (once near the beginning and once at the mid-point) if he'd like me to stop reading this book and he said no. So he, at least, got something out of it. I have always enjoyed reading the classics to my children but have to say this is one that has not stood the test of time very well.
  • (3/5)
    When I began reading Peter Pan, I was stunned at how much children's literature has changed since this book was written. I actually felt uncomfortable reading it to my kids. The author seems very much convinced that children should be seen and not heard, and the book says things like, "Children are such naughty creatures; they are selfish and only care for themselves. They should be thankful that adults are willing to love them." Well, that's paraphrasing, but these are the sorts of ideas the book puts forth. However, I don't think this book should be forgotten. It's a treasure of classic literature because it truly is an enchanting and wonderful tale. I recommend it for those who wish to expand their knowledge of classic literature, but not for a parent searching for a read-aloud bedtime tale.
  • (4/5)
    In this classic tale of the boy who never grows old Wendy, is whisked away to Neverland to become the mother of aband of lost boys. She faces many adventures and dangers as she tries to take care of this group of rowdy boys. Great book.
  • (5/5)
    This copy is really beautifully done, the pictures are really beautiful. As far as the story, does it really need a review?
  • (5/5)
    Peter Pan is a childhood favorite. I used to watch the movie so many times my dad had to make about five copies so I wouldn't ruin the original tape. I love the idea of Neverland and the Lost Boys. I think a part of everyone never truly wishes to grow up and take on adult responsibilites and Peter Pan represents this desire. One difference between the Disney animation and the book is the part involving the thimble and the kiss. Peter Pan misnames the two and believes a kiss is a thimble and visa versa.I think Peter Pan is a childhood favorite and classic for all.
  • (2/5)
    I stopped reading after 50 pages -- a bit twee for me. Although I like that Tinker Bell (like all true fairies) is a rotter.
  • (4/5)
    Another strange story I list among my favorites and keep coming back to. I don't really think children can fully appreciate the story.
  • (5/5)
    This book was shocking to find. Everybody knows the story of Peter Pan, but to read Barrie's work changes the way we approach it. The language is so fresh and invigorating and just pure fun.
  • (4/5)
    I re-read this recently, and it was actually much better than I'd remembered from my childhood.
  • (5/5)
    The most beautiful, delicately illustrated, unabridged edition I've ever seen. No need to comment on the content. Everyone knows how wonderful the story is.
  • (5/5)
    Having been a fan of Peter all my life since listening to the Mary Martin musical soundtrack at a tender age, I am surprised that it took me so long to actually read the original, unabridged story. It is, as an actor from the most recent film version put it, "The most famous book nobody's ever read."I find the book incredible...besides sheer entertainment value and a magical quality that will keep the kids mesmerized, it is packed with odd psychological symbolism that many adults will recognize as the author's venting of his own childhood traumas. A brief look into Barrie's bio makes a lot of the stranger things in Pan far more understandable, if undoubtedly tragic. Barrie does have a rather flippant way of engaging the reader, teasing and goading much the same way as his mischeivous, conscience-less hero. But he also writes with poetic beauty, filling his characters with rich and quirky descriptive elements such as Peter being somehow very like the unnattainable kiss Mrs. Darling keeps in the right-hand corner of her mouth (which only he is then able to get). The book does betray the social conventions of its time in Wendy's attitude toward motherhood (which is only problematic if you are a raving feminist) and a bit more uncomfortably in its depiction of the Indian culture on Neverland. These elements need not detract from the story if one is careful to put them in context for its young readers. The recent film adaptation, although closest of all the films in its adherence to character, is misleading in its interpretation of the story being about the sexual awakening of adolescence. The hidden theme of the book is overwhelmingly the innocence of childhood - innocence in the sense not of inherent goodness, but in inherent un-self-consciousness. Peter is a symbol of eternal childhood, not human at all, and as such is incapable of reciprocating or even understanding Wendy's budding romantic notions. He is selfish, but not self-aware. Ultimately, he is the lament of one man who lost his own mother too soon, and consequently never grew up himself. Be assured, however, that all this goes right over the heads of young readers, and even adults will only catch it by reading critically and analytically. Brilliant literature that deserves its place as a long-beloved children's classic