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The Hound of the Baskervilles: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery

The Hound of the Baskervilles: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery

Written by Arthur Conan Doyle

Narrated by Gene Engene


The Hound of the Baskervilles: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery

Written by Arthur Conan Doyle

Narrated by Gene Engene

ratings:
4/5 (110 ratings)
Length:
6 hours
Released:
Dec 11, 2014
ISBN:
9781614536826
Format:
Audiobook

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Also available as bookBook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

Description

"The last red streaks had faded away in the west and night settled upon the moor. A few faint stars were gleaming in a violet sky. Watson and I gazed out over the shadowy moor, half silver and half gloom. A distant howl arose from the shadowy depths, menacing, almost musical, rising and falling like the low constant murmur of the sea, the hound!" Complete and unabridged, in its original serial format from THE STRAND MAGAZINE, The Hound of the Baskervilles is a superb audiobook. It remains one of Arthur Conan Doyle's most popular works.
Released:
Dec 11, 2014
ISBN:
9781614536826
Format:
Audiobook

Also available as...

Also available as bookBook

About the author

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859–1930) was a Scottish writer and physician, most famous for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes and long-suffering sidekick Dr Watson. Conan Doyle was a prolific writer whose other works include fantasy and science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels.


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Reviews

What people think about The Hound of the Baskervilles

4.0
110 ratings / 140 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Classic Sherlock Holmes at his finest. A great story with thrills along the way. I've read and seen the movie versions of this story multiple times, but I still enjoy reading this over and over again. The story never gets old.
  • (5/5)
    A veritable classic, what more can you say! Despite the course of time this is still a great story. After all the collections of stories about Sherlock Holmes I really enjoyed the greater depth that a novel allowed with a very intriguing story and some great inventiveness in the writing! I wish he'd written more as extended novels. Definitely should be read by everyone.
  • (4/5)
    A very, very enjoyable read: definitely the pinnacle (thus far) of the Holmes canon.

    Every element fits into its proper place: the isolated location is well described, with many fascinating features such as the Neolithic huts, fatal bogs and rows of yews. Each character is well-drawn, and each has their own mystery which interlocks perfectly with the overarching puzzle. By utilising different aspects of Watson's narrative voice - his diary, his letters, his reminiscences - Conan Doyle is able to shake up his writing formula somewhat, and present us with a mystery in which both Watson and Holmes are used to their respective strengths.

    Beyond this, the mystery is multi-faceted and - particularly noteworthy - the novel is about every aspect of the crime, not just the "whodunnit" or how. As a result, even though the revelations are really no more than typical Conan Doyle fare, they are in no way a letdown, because it is only part of a larger canvas.

    Seasoned crime readers like myself will probably pick up on the big clue planted very early in the book but, even then, it by no means allows you to solve the crime. The only aspect which might be seen by some as negative is that the book is always happy to pause and consider any minute clue (half a chapter is spent on exactly which newspaper a ransom-style note was cut from). To me, though, this is quintessential Holmes. The traces of romantic characterisation and storytelling linger, but are kept in check by the power of the work overall. As a result, I'm soldiering on with renewed vigour to the sixth of the nine Holmes books.
  • (4/5)
    “The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.” – Sherlock HolmesAfter having watched the movies and TV shows, I finally read my first Sherlock Holmes book. From various reviews and from the Foreword, I thought I had chosen one of the best, if not the best, Holmes book. Unfortunately, it felt --- ‘passive’. I’ll explain.The story surrounds a ghostly hound that haunts the Baskervilles family from several generations ago. After the untimely and unexplained death of Sir Charles Baskerville, the last Baskerville heir, Sir Henry, and his family friend, Dr. Mortimer, seek the help of the famous Sherlock Holmes to determine once and for all, the truth between the mystery hound and the legend that curses the Baskerville family members and estate. With a butler and wife at the estate, a number of inquisitive neighbors, an escaped convict, and the shadowy, foggy grounds of Grimpen Mire with moor and bog-hole that is the grassland version of quicksand, a delectable setting is laid for the whodunnit and how.Perhaps movies and televisions have ruined my perspective; I had expected to journey with Holmes and Watson in their fact-finding. Since Holmes is tied-up with his current cases, Watson accompanies Sir Henry to his newly inherited estate ahead of Holmes. The facts are then revealed via Watson’s reports and excerpts from his diary; this approach and associated writing-style yields a past-tense feeling and the reader is not on the same journey with them. When Holmes ‘arrives’ (I’ll let you interpret the reason for the air-quote marks), the action begins, but the culprit is already identified. Even the ta-da moment is rather flat, and a last chapter is written as a retrospection. I didn’t even have a chance to get excited. Having guessed a couple of things didn’t help either. The book simply didn’t generate the excitement I had wanted. I feel like such a traitor to literature for saying such blasphemy against the great Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Well, if it’ll make you feel better, when I was little, I thought these stories were based on a real detective. Anyway, it’s still a pretty good read, especially since its first release was 1901. I also valued the book having reinforced the Holmes’ and Watson’s behaviors and methods commonly depicted on the screen. One quote:On the love between siblings:“…But first I had the unpleasant duty of breaking the news to Barrymore and his wife. To him it may have been an unmitigated relief, but she wept bitterly in her apron. To all the world he was the man of violence, half animal and half demon; but to her he always remained the little willful boy of her own girlhood, the child who had clung to her hand. Evil indeed is the man who has not one woman to mourn him.”
  • (5/5)
    Actually now having "read" it, after having seen so many film versions. I had little trouble "seeing" it all happen.
  • (3/5)
    I have really enjoyed the Sherlock Holmes stories and was excited for this one as it is often promoted as the best. While I did like this story, I did not think it was one of the best. The mystery was not all that challenging, and I felt that the story dragged a bit in places. I enjoyed the characters and the setting, but not my favorite.
  • (4/5)
    Though the incredible cruelty to a dog gets totally ignored in this frightening tale,we get most of the clues and so can make more predictions than in previous short novels.The mystery is a complicated one, not the least of it is why Dr. Watson did not follow Sherlock'sexplicit instructions to never leave the baron alone. One other remaining mystery - since neither he, nor his body, were ever found, where is the final proof that the murderer is dead?
  • (4/5)
    The real hero of these stories is Watson for having the restraint not to have strangled that insufferable egomaniac Holmes whenever he had a chance. Holmes is brilliant...and never misses an opportunity to let you know it.
  • (5/5)
    For a large section of this book Sherlock does not appear. You hear Dr. Watson's point of view. It is only later you learn what he has been doing off screen. It was a really enjoyable mystery.
  • (4/5)
    Doyle's descriptions of both characters and setting are top notch. I always enjoy "deducing" along with Sherlock and Watson. The mystery in this book was just so-so.
  • (5/5)
    The stories of Sherlock Holmes are always a interesting read--even more so now because of the popularity or recent movies and TV shows. The Hounds of the Baskervilles is one of the most loved stories in the Sherlock Holmes series and I can see why!
  • (4/5)
    Probably the most-referred-to case Sherlock Holmes ever solved, I only went into it knowing it had something to do with a supernatural dog. I feel like I must have read this when I was younger, if only in a simplified version, but I didn't remember anything more about it. Watson comes to the forefront in this one for quite a while, which makes it interesting. The twists and turns are enjoyable, even if I found none of the players in the case particularly endearing. Recommended for: everyone.Quote: "I am afraid, my dear Watson, that most of your conclusions were erroneous. When I said that you stimulated me I meant, to be frank, that in noting your fallacies I was occasionally guided towards the truth."
  • (5/5)
    I'm not sure what took me so long to read this book. I've always loved Sherlock Holmes since I first saw Basil Rathbone's version on t.v. as a child. This was a lovely mystery. Although, I knew the basis of the story (from what I could remember seeing as a child and also from the Moffit/Gatiss modern version of the tale), I still found myself surprised in a few areas. I even found myself jumping at one point when my telephone rang while I was reading a particularly dark description of the moors at night.

    I do love Sherlock Holmes and think everyone should read at least some of Doyle's masterpiece series at least once in their lifetime. As I've told my son (who is currently reading A Study in Scarlet), you might just be surprised with how readable and enjoyable, Doyle's work is.
  • (3/5)
    Holmes and Watson are engaged on a case to both find out how someone died and to save his heir from the same fate. Legend has it that there is a giant demon hound with glowing eyes and mouth who prowls about the moors, and giant dog footprints are found near the body of the victim. Naturally, Holmes doesn't believe it's something supernatural, and so he sends Watson off to investigate & report back to him.

    This is my first, and most likely last, Conrad Doyle novel. I almost liked it. I'm not sure what all the fuss is about over this writer or his Sherlock Holmes character. It was not the best 19th century mystery novel I've read, and I wasn't particularly impressed with Holmes. The writing is so-so, and so I'm really rating this 2.5, but have rounded it up.
  • (4/5)
    I read this as a youngster, and I'm so glad I read it again! Good thriller, tightly paced, with enough twists and turns to keep my interest! Bravo Holmes!
  • (5/5)
    Being a Sherlock Holmes fan, picking a favorite is difficult... but pressed to do so this would have to be the winner! It has everything, mystery, horror, it's creepy, Dr. Watson get to shine a bit, and the interactions between Holmes and Watson are exemplary. There is also no shortage of the incorrigible behavior Sherlock is so well known for. If you haven't perused this book yet, get a copy and read a great story!
  • (5/5)
    This book is a classic. When you look at all the other reviews of it out there I wonder, what can I add? I think that out of all of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries this would have to be the best one. At least, in my eyes the most popular. I highly recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    Absorbing read but I don't think Doyle really meant for you to figure things out beforehand.
  • (4/5)
    I've tried numerous times to start Sherlock Holmes at the beginning, i.e. a Study in Scarlet. This was a mistake. I'm so glad I decided to give Doyle another chance with another book picked at random - The Hound of the Baskervilles is a great read with fully fleshed characters. I was recently blown away by a pastiche (Dust and Shadow by Lyndsay Faye) and it was awesome to see where the clear style came from. I like Holmes' method for solving cases, though I think a psychological approach (think Poirot) brings better results. Loved Watson in this and though the end is quite abrupt, I was satisfied with the solution. Will definitely read more books.
  • (3/5)
    Having read a couple examples of both, I think I generally prefer Doyle's books over his short stories, mostly because in the books there is more showing, rather then just having clients and Sherlock telling the reader everything, over and over again.
  • (4/5)
    When you recognize that you love a good mystery book it is hard to say that you hate the king of the mystery/detective story, so I won't because this was legitimately an excellent book. It held my interest from the first few pages until the very end, which is rare for a book to do for me. In most instances I find myself not wanting to come back for at least a day and then pushing myself to read the rest of a book, but this one I read every single day since I started it for at least an hour a day.

    Doyle came back to Holmes for this great story that infused supernatural and reality together nicely. He made you believe that it was possible the supernatural was occurring, but then revealed all when appropriate. I enjoy a writer that can turn the plot around quickly to reveal the truth of what is happening to characters.

    The characters are believable for the time period. The motives are sound and reasonable as well. Some mysteries I have felt that the author is grasping at straws, but here everything adds nicely. It may just be that Doyle has had enough experience filling in every plot hole imaginable that one doesn't feel that he is lacking. He even goes as far to explain how an animal was fed while its master was away. These things showcase a brilliant writer who thinks about the aspects that a reader may notice or question.

    This story made me desire to devour more Doyle in the future. I believe that reading some more Sherlock Holmes stories may be in my near future!
  • (2/5)
    really like every single sherlock holmes story except for this one
  • (4/5)
    A demonic hound is terrorizing the Baskerville family.I have to admit that the first thing I thought upon finishing this book was: "I would have gotten away with it first if it hadn't been for that meddling detective!" To be fair, Conan Doyle long preceded Scooby-Doo, and the writing is much better. But in terms of plot, they certainly could be kissing cousins.I remember reading a lot of Sherlock Holmes as a kid, although I don't remember which stories I read, or if this famous novel was among them. I have the Puffin Classics edition, and I think this novel, and Sherlock Holmes in general, holds up well for young readers. Conan Doyle's writing is clean, straightforward, and evocative. I particularly enjoyed his descriptions of the moors in this book--they came across as both beautiful and menacing. I was glad to revisit Sherlock Holmes. After seeing so many televised and film adaptations, we can lose sight of the original work and forget that it's also worth reading in its own right.This story was inspired by the legend of ghostly black dogs in Dartmoor. Its appearance was regarded as a portent of death.Revisiting children's classics (2014). I also read this as part of the MysteryCAT challenge for March 2014: children's mysteries.
  • (5/5)
    Having read the earlier novels I was under the impression that Sherlock Holmes only really worked in short stories. Now I have read this I see I was wrong and would like to apologise unreservedly to Mr Doyle through the medium of Librarything... or just through the medium (ha ha)! This is just as good as many of the stories but there's more of it.
  • (3/5)
    It was good, but not great. One of the most popular and enduring detective series ever written? Well, I would rather read an Agatha Christie, I think. I still think about Ten Little Indians...

    Don't get me wrong, I liked the book and enjoyed reading it, but it doesn't make me want to run out and get another Sherlock Holmes book. However, nor will it keep me from reading another one, should it be recommended.

    As for recommending this one, I would say that yes, you should read it. If for nothing else than it is of some repute and should be added to your read list based solely on that merit.
  • (5/5)
    There is nothing that needs said about this that has not already been said.

    Although sometimes I wish that Holmes would be a TOUCH nicer to Watson?
  • (5/5)
    Im fan of everything Sherlock Holmes by Doyle & Laurie King. I wish Dolye was here to continue the stories because no one but Laurie King compares.
  • (5/5)
    What can I say? Hound of the Baskervilles is a classic and might possibly be the best of the Holmes stories. Perfectly crafted, and perfectly atmospheric, this is the kind of story that can be read again and again. In fact, this is at least my third read and on this go-around I was much more able to admire the subtle clues and hints Conan Doyle wove through the tale. Although I do have one question: Dr. Mortimer's wife is mentioned several times in the story and I have to wonder how she felt about him traipsing off around the world without her? If you like gothic, or mysteries, or just a good atmospheric thriller, you can't go wrong with this one.
  • (3/5)
    An excellant Sherlock Holmes quest.
  • (2/5)
    Slow and monotonous, and the world flip toward the end was jarring at best.