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The Tangled Skein

The Tangled Skein


The Tangled Skein

ratings:
4.5/5 (8 ratings)
Length:
2 hours
Released:
Jan 1, 2012
ISBN:
9781844358977
Format:
Audiobook

Description

A threat to Holmes’s life, murders on Hampstead Heath and a deadly phantom lady lead Holmes and Watson into the most dangerous investigation they have ever undertaken: an encounter which brings them face to face with Count Dracula, the Lord of the Undead.
Released:
Jan 1, 2012
ISBN:
9781844358977
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

David Stuart Davies is an author, playwright and editor and is regarded as an authority on Sherlock Holmes. His fiction includes novels featuring his wartime detective Johnny Hawke and several Sherlock Holmes novels - including Sherlock Holmes and the Devil's Promise. He is a committee member of the Crime Writers' Association, editing their monthly publication, Red Herrings, and is a Fellow of the Royal Literary Fund.


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Reviews

What people think about The Tangled Skein

4.3
8 ratings / 4 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    I loved this book even though Dracula was in it. I love anything Holmes and Watson, I recommend this book to all that love Sherlock Holmes.****I received this book in exchange for an honest review****
  • (4/5)
    A pastiche of course, but for me a good one. If you can stomach the basic Holmes vs Dracula premise then there is no reason not to enjoy this tale. This is a sequel of sorts to Hound of the Baskervilles with the inevitable return to Dartmoor and added 'undead'. Stuart Davies has an impeccable pedigree as a 'Sherlockian' (or 'Holmesian' if you prefer) and his knowledge of and passion for the the world's greatest detective shines through. Apart from one badly misjudged scene with a possessed owl (yes, really) the plot races along at a cracking pace, mixing adventure and detective in just the right proportions to bring to mind ACD's own canon.More a short story then a novel, a couple of hours will see this finished and, in my opinion, that's 120 minutes well spent.
  • (5/5)
    Another great re imagining of Sherlock Holmes stories.A mix of murder and vampires with the presence of Van Helsing.Very highly recommended.I was given a digital copy of this book by the publisher Endeavour via Netgalley in return for an honest unbiased review which I am happy to do.
  • (3/5)
    When a device arrives at 221B Baker Street that was meant to kill him, Sherlock Holmes sets out to investigate. He is captured by an old adversary from an earlier case whom he had long thought dead. At the same time, a woman arrives at Baker Street and tells Watson that Holmes is walking into a trap. Fortunately, Inspector Lestrade shows up right after she leaves to ask for his aid in solving some very strange deaths and he and Watson are able to rescue Holmes.Lestrade’s case involves some very unusual murders linked to a phantom woman who is only seen at night. What particularly interests Holmes is the proximity of the deaths to Baskerville Hall. As he and Watson investigate, they meet the famous vampire hunter, Abraham Van Helsing who tells them that Count Dracula has taken up residence somewhere in England and suggests this may have some bearing on their case. Holmes and Watson are, not surprisingly, somewhat skeptical of this claim but the more they investigate, the more they are convinced that he is right, especially after they encounter the woman. And the more they investigate, the more it seems that this new case is somehow linked to the old adversary. I am not quite convinced that pitting Sherlock Holmes, that most rational of fictitious detectives with Dracula as author David Stuart Davies does in his novel, Sherlock Holmes and the Tangled Skein, works. Still, if it’s to be done, Davies has chosen the right setting and original Holmes story to serve as backdrop. The Hound of the Baskervilles is, to my mind at least, the most gothic of Conan Doyle’s tales with its dark brooding mansion on the forbidding moors - a setting just guaranteed to raise shivers and which allows for the presence of supernatural elements whether it’s a phantom dog who howls (or doesn’t) in the night to herald a death or vampires. That aside, this is a well-written tale and an enjoyable read although it would probably appeal more to fans of vampire stories or the paranormal than fans of the original Sherlock Holmes books.Thanks to Netgalley and Endeavour press for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review