Find your next favorite audiobook

Become a member today and listen free for 30 days
Dance of the Bones: A J. P. Beaumont Novel

Dance of the Bones: A J. P. Beaumont Novel

Written by J. A. Jance

Narrated by J.R. Horne


Dance of the Bones: A J. P. Beaumont Novel

Written by J. A. Jance

Narrated by J.R. Horne

ratings:
4/5 (21 ratings)
Length:
10 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Sep 8, 2015
ISBN:
9780062395511
Format:
Audiobook

Description

J. P. Beaumont and Brandon Walker, two of New York Times bestselling author J. A. Jance's most acclaimed series characters, join forces for the first time in one of the most suspenseful works of her career.

Years ago, Amos Warren, a prospector, was gunned down out in the desert and Sheriff Brandon Walker made the arrest in the case. Now, the retired Walker is called in when the alleged killer, John Lassiter, refuses to accept a plea deal that would release him from prison with time served. Lassiter wants Brandon and The Last Chance to find Amos's "real" killer and clear his name.

Sixteen hundred miles to the north in Seattle, J.P. Beaumont is at loose ends after the Special Homicide Investigation Team, affectionately known as S.H.I.T., has been unexpectedly and completely disbanded. When Brandon discovers that there are links between Lassiter's case and an unsolved case in Seattle, he comes to Beau for help.

Those two cases suddenly become hot when two young boys from the reservation, one of them with close ties to the Walker family, go missing. Can two seasoned cops, working together, decipher the missing pieces in time to keep them alive?

Publisher:
Released:
Sep 8, 2015
ISBN:
9780062395511
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

J.A. Jance is the New York Times bestelling author of the J.P Beaumont series, the Joanna Brady series, Edge of Evil, and three stand-alone thrillers. Born in South Dakota and brought up in Bisbee, Arizona, Jance lives with her husband in Seattle, Washington, and Tuscan, Arizona.

Related to Dance of the Bones

Related Audiobooks
Related Articles

Reviews

What people think about Dance of the Bones

4.0
21 ratings / 17 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (4/5)
    This is my first Jance novel, and I must say I thoroughly enjoyed this novel. It combined an interesting old murder case in which the wrong man was convicted, a more recent smuggling/murder/kidnapping case, interwoven with wonderful Native American culture and folklore. Great read.
  • (3/5)
    Not a bad story, though the interweaving of the native mythology was a little heavy.
  • (4/5)
    I received this book free from GoodReads.This book is being marketed on the gimmick that it is in both the Brandon Walker and JP Beaumont series which is fine but Beaumont doesn't really factor in much and any Seattle cop could have been substituted. This isn't a criticism of the book, which reads quite well--in fact the best of the few Jance novels that I've read---but rather the need for gimmicky marketing.I liked this book right from the start where a series of crimes began in 1970 with an old ex-con desert dweller. The book then transitions to the current day, but keeps looking back to the past for hints on why that initial crime shaped the present and how one murder would eventually affect many people. Jance does a great job of making the various characters interesting.
  • (4/5)
    J.A. Jance's latest novel bring protagonists from two of her series, Brandon Walker in Arizona and J. Beaumont in Seattle. Although, not quite as adept as Tony Hillerman in bringing native culture and stories into her mysteries, she does an admirable job in having medical doctor, Indian shaman, Lani, November between the two cultures. People who have not read Jance's former mysteries, may need more than the background given in the story. It was an enjoyable read.
  • (4/5)
    This is my first book by Jance and it came through the Goodreads First Reads and I am happy that it did. This is a full-bodied mystery which makes me want to read others of the series because the characters are to well defined and the story keeps your interest. Good one.J. Robert Ewbank author "John Wesley, Natural Man, and the Isms" "Wesley's Wars" "To Whom It May Concern" and "Tell me about the United Methodist Church"
  • (3/5)
    I probably would have rated this higher if not for the disappointment of the insignificant role Beau played. Advertising this as a J P Beaumont book is misleading. It is a good story and should have been called an entry in the Walker series. The Walker characters are interesting to visit again after five years.
  • (4/5)
    Jance has combined two of her major characters, Brandon Walker and J.P. Beaumont, into one novel. (Walker figures much more predominantly.) A cold homicide investigation from back in the 1970's suddenly becomes very much front-burner and gets the juices of two "old" lawmen sizzling again. This was the audio version, and frankly, it was a very confusing listen because the narrator used the same tone of voice for all characters. Major scene changes occurred with scarcely a breath in-between. While this might work fine on the written page, it was very confusion when delivered in audio format. I would read the book and forget the audio if I had it to do over.
  • (4/5)
    Picking up the latest J.A. Jance book is like settling down on the porch to catch up on the latest with an old friend. That latest is her new book, Dance of the Bones. And the old friends? Well, this is the 22nd book for J.P. Beaumont and the 5th book featuring members of the Walker family.Detective Brandon Walker is retired as is Special Investigator J.P. Beaumont. 1600 miles separate them, but a cold case from 40 years ago, brought to light with new evidence from The Last Chance group will have them working together. Faithful Beaumont fans, take note - Brandon has the lead role in this novel.Prospector Amos Warren and his partner Big Bad John Lassiter had a violent argument in a bar full of witnesses. When Warren's body is found, it is Lassister who is convicted. Except - we know who the real killer is - the opening prologue details Warren's death. The reader is along for the ride as the two men try to track down the real murderer. Knowing 'whodunit' early on did not detract at all from my enjoyment of the book.Readers not familiar with the Walker clan and their friends may find the first few chapters a bit busy - there are many characters and the relationships go back many years. (Dr. Lani Walker is my favourite) But, Jance does provide enough backstory that the reader will be quickly brought up to speed.The Walkers live in Pima County, Arizona. Every chapter opens with lore and legends from the Tohono O'odham, people of the desert, that mirrors much that is happening in the book. I really enjoyed these and the way that Jance wove First Nations culture into her book.Jance's mysteries are not cozy, but they're not difficult overly difficult to suss out either. For me, it is the characters that draw me to Jance's writing. It's comfortable and comforting to reconnect with characters I've enjoyed over the years. And I'm always curious as to their lives will evolve from book to book. This melding of two series with a new cold case group may provide many opportunities for other crossovers.
  • (3/5)
    Dance of the Bones by J.A. Jance is a 2015 William Morrow publication. I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher and Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. I have read books from three of Jance's series, Beaumont being my all time favorite character. I have not read any of the books about the Walker family , this being my first introduction to the characters from that series. This book is marketed as a Beaumont novel- listing it as the 22nd in that series, but that is a little bit misleading, since Beaumont makes little more than a cameo appearance here. This is definitely Brandon Walker's show. There are several threads running through this novel, but the main story line involves a man convicted of a crime he may be innocent of, a man Brandon Walker put behind bars. So, after all these years, Brandon finds himself once more embroiled in what is most likely a cold case, and after discovering a connection to another old case, Brandon reaches out to J.P. Beaumont, who just happens to have a little time on his hands. There are a lot of characters in this story and at times I felt a little lost. This could be due to my lack of familiarity with the Walker series, but I usually find it difficult to keep up with a large cast of characters, no matter what. However, the plot is not all that complicated, so it wasn't that hard to follow, actually. However, the story doesn't flow smoothly, is jagged and disjointed all the way up to the midway mark. There are too many flashbacks, for lack of a better word, for one thing, which made it hard to maintain my focus on the main thread. The Native American story that began each chapter was a nice touch, and is very interesting and I liked the way the reservation traditions was woven into the story, especially concerning Gabe. Once I got familiar with all the characters, and their roles, I was able to relax into the story more and once I reached the halfway point, I could see things starting to come together and the writing tightened up a great deal in the last half of the book, enabling me to became more engrossed in the story. This was not my favorite book by this author, but it did introduce me to the Walker's and I liked them well enough to want to catch up with them someday. Although, it got off to a pretty rocky start, the story ended up being enjoyable enough, in the end.
  • (3/5)
    As a rule I love J.A. Jance's books, but Dance of the Bones is not one of her best-- and J.P. Beaumont fans will be disappointed, since he plays a crucial (but very small) role.Jance's Walker family series set in the Tucson, Arizona area have always used many legends of the Tohono O'odham people. Normally I enjoy reading them, but in this case they kept dragging me out of the story-- even if they did pertain to two of my favorite characters, Gabe Ortiz and Lani Walker-Pardee. Speaking of characters, the bad guy needed to be more hands-on. Always having minions doing the dirty work sapped the killer's evil mojo. Instead of fear or anxiety, I felt irritation.With so many interconnected loops of plot, reading Dance of the Bones was like stepping in the middle of a nest of rattlesnakes. Lots of distraction, occasional confusion, and a feeling that the story didn't live up to the often beautiful way Jance uses the English language.
  • (3/5)
    OK but forced crossover between two seriess. The complex band distrcting native lore beginning each chapter did not help. Good try at something that could have been interesting. More mayhem and murder than mystery.
  • (4/5)
    Prospector Amos Warren was gunned down in the desert many years ago; Sheriff Brandon Walker arrested John Lassiter who, in due time, was convicted of the crime. Imprisoned ever since, he has steadfastly maintained his innocence and has refused to accept a time-served plea deal worked out by The Last Chance organization, a deal that would give him his freedom. He wants the real murderer to be found so his name can be cleared; he will not plead guilty for something he did not do. Lassiter asks Brandon Walker to work with The Last Chance group and look into the case, to find the one who really murdered his friend, Amos.When Brandon discovers a link between the Warren murder and an unsolved cold case in Seattle, retired detective J.P. Beaumont becomes involved in the investigation. But things take an unexpected turn when two brothers are executed out in the desert and two other boys disappear. Can the two veteran cops find the missing pieces that connect the two cases and solve the mystery before the teens lose their lives?The beginning of each chapter presents a portion of an Indian tale and the weaving of the Tohono O’odham culture, myth, and beliefs throughout the story adds depth and richness to the narrative. Crisp writing and well-drawn characters keep the suspense building and although readers are clued in to the identity of Warren’s murderer, there are more than enough plot twists to keep the pages turning.Recommended.
  • (4/5)
    In 1970, Arizona sheriff Brandon Walker had arrested John Lassiter for the murder of Amos Warren, a man Lassiter had once considered like a father. Lassiter is still in prison in 2015 and suffering from MS but, when offered a plea deal, he refuses. He wants Walker, who is now retired and working for a group that reviews cold cases, to look into Warren’s murder to find the real killer. At first reluctant, as he looks deeper into it, Walker begins to have doubts about the conviction. He discovers a link between the Lassiter case and an unsolved homicide in Seattle. He contacts retired Seattle detective JP Beaumont to help him unravel what is turning out to be a very far-reaching mystery. When two boys disappear from the Tohono O’odham reservation where Walker’s daughter Lani and her husband Dan Pardee live, Walker is convinced this is somehow tied in and he has very little time left to solve the case if there is any hope of finding them alive. Then Lani disappears…In Dance of the Bones, author J.A. Jance brings two of her most popular detectives out of retirement and they work very well together to solve one of the most challenging cases either has ever faced. With a plot full of twists and turns and infused with the legends and culture of the Tohono O’odham people, Jance has created a very intelligent, entertaining, and suspenseful novel, one that keeps the reader’s attention from the first page and never lets up until the end.
  • (4/5)
    IN, Anything that starts out with a fight over trashy women and treasure is only a good hot mess in my opinion. This read is definitely a treasure over trash. Jance has not always been on my reading radar but I look forward to going back and catching up with her characters. That said, you don’t need to be a series follower to enjoy this but you will want to join her flock. The mystery is character driven and strong and somewhat gritty. I couldn’t help thinking of James Lee Burke and Craig Johnson. However, I like seeing a queen bee added to my references! Now, back to the beginning with Beamont and Brandon for me…Provided by #tlcbooktours
  • (4/5)
    DANCE OF THE BONES by J A JanceJance brings two of her detectives together in this latest mystery. Brandon Walker in the Southwest is asked by the daughter of a convicted murderer to reopen her father’s case. Combining Native American lore with tough detective work Walker brings J P Beaumont in Seattle into the mystery of two longtime friends, a lost treasure, a scheming woman, a long ago murder and several very fresh murders.Jance uses the talents of both detectives to advance the story and solve the mystery. Personally, I found the Native American tale sections that began each chapter to be distracting. As usual her plotting is tight and the characters are real as are the conversations. A good read.4 of 5 stars
  • (3/5)
    Ava Martin set him up. John Lassiter has been serving years for murdering Amos Warren in March 1970; a crime he didn’t commit. Now it’s March 2015. Lassiter refuses to accept a plea deal. He’ll never confess to a crime he was not guilty of. Instead, he calls on the arresting officer, Sheriff Brandon Walker, to look into it further. Walker has since retired, but is working with TLC (The Last Chance), a group that has been successful with reviewing old cases and proving the innocence of some prisoners. Unexpectedly, Walker discovers a link to another homicide in Seattle. He contacts J.P. Beaumont, a retired Seattle detective. The two begin sharing resources. Then, more recently, two boys from the Tohono O’odham reservation in Tucson, AZ go missing.I like that the author combined two great series detectives to work with each other. Dance of the Bones was #22 of the J.P. Beaumont series and #5 of the Brandon Walker series. There is a stronger emphasis on Walker than Beaumont. I thought the action was lagging and there was a blurb at the beginning of each chapter of Tohono O’odham Indian Lore which didn’t seem to add any real benefit to the overall story. It is suspenseful and the reader will want to know how it all ends as there are a few twists thrown in. Rating: 3 out of 5.
  • (3/5)
    From Book Cover:

    Years ago, Amos Warren, a prospector, was gunned down out in the desert and Sheriff Brandon Walker made the arrest in the case. Now, the retired Walker is called in when the alleged killer, John Lassiter, refuses to accept a plea deal that would release him from prison with time served. Lassiter wants Brandon and The Last Chance to find Amos’s “real” killer and clear his name. Sixteen hundred miles to the north in Seattle, J.P. Beaumont is at loose ends after the Special Homicide Investigation Team, affectionately known as S.H.I.T., has been unexpectedly and completely disbanded. When Brandon discovers that there are links between Lassiter’s case and an unsolved case in Seattle, he comes to Beau for help. Those two cases suddenly become hot when two young boys from the reservation, one of them with close ties to the Walker family, go missing. Can two seasoned cops, working together, decipher the missing pieces in time to keep them alive?

    My Thoughts:

    I have read books from all three of J.A. Jance's series with Beaumont being my all time favorite character. I had thought with the conclusion of the last Beaumont book that it read like she was ending this series...so when this one came along I early awaited it. However...I found that this book though marketed as a Beaumont novel and listing it as the 22nd in that series... it is a tad misleading since Beaumont makes little more than a cameo appearance. This is definitely Brandon Walker's show. The story doesn't flow smoothly at all. It is jagged and disjointed all the way up to the midway mark with way too many flashbacks making it hard to maintain your focus on the main thread. Since I am not a huge fan of the Walker series and having so little Beaumont in the story, I found I was forcing myself to finish it.