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The Miracle of Mindfulness: An Introduction to the Practice of Meditation

The Miracle of Mindfulness: An Introduction to the Practice of Meditation

Written by Thich Nhat Hanh

Narrated by John Lee


The Miracle of Mindfulness: An Introduction to the Practice of Meditation

Written by Thich Nhat Hanh

Narrated by John Lee

ratings:
4.5/5 (101 ratings)
Length:
3 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Dec 24, 2012
ISBN:
9781452681184
Format:
Audiobook

Description

In this beautiful and lucid guide, Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh offers gentle anecdotes and practical exercises as a means of learning the skills of mindfulness—being awake and fully aware. From washing the dishes to answering the phone to peeling an orange, he reminds us that each moment holds within it an opportunity to work toward greater self-understanding and peacefulness.

Publisher:
Released:
Dec 24, 2012
ISBN:
9781452681184
Format:
Audiobook

About the author

Thich Nhat Hanh was a world-renowned Buddhist Zen master, poet, author, scholar, and activist for social change, who was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. He was the author of many bestselling books, including the classics Peace Is Every Step and The Art of Living. Through his books and retreats at the monasteries he has founded in the U.S., Europe, Asia, and Australia, he became a pre-eminent figure in contemporary Buddhism, offering teachings that are both deeply rooted in ancient wisdom and accessible to all.  Sister Chan Khong is Thich Nhat Hanh’s most senior monastic disciple and lifelong collaborator. A leading force in his engaged Buddhism programs and humanitarian projects, her books include Learning True Love and Beginning Anew. Sister True Dedication is a former journalist and monastic Dharma Teacher ordained by Thich Nhat Hanh. 



Reviews

What people think about The Miracle of Mindfulness

4.5
101 ratings / 31 Reviews
What did you think?
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Critic reviews

  • Thich Nhat Hanh wrote a stunningly beautiful letter to his friend about the simple wonders of living daily life and doing daily chores with mindfulness. I'm grateful that letter became this book.

    Scribd Editors

Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    An interesting and well written/translated letter on a range of mindfulness topics. I especially found the revelation that we are all of ourselves on page 40 to be interesting.
  • (4/5)
    The Miracle of Mindfulness is a beautifully personal, simple, and clearly written book by the Vietnamese Zen Master, Tich Nhat Hahn. In it he weaves personal stories, commentary, and instruction together in an easily accessible way, providing a virtual handbook to meditation. He argues that one does not have to sit in full lotus to meditate, though zazen (sitting meditation) certainly has it's placed and shouldn't simply be discarded. But, through the miracle that is mindfulness, a person can transform every action and moment of their life into a form of meditation.Experiment in Reading
  • (5/5)
    This is a nicely formatted gift edition. It is definitely a gift to me having won it as a early reviewer's book. The small size is handy. Thich Nhat Hanh's artistic calligraphy enhances each chapter and there are photos included too. Of course, it's the calming and thoughtful introduction to mindfulness that makes it all so special. Having read it through just once, I feel the need to read it many times more. This little book is packed. If meditation and mindfulness are of interest to you, this is a great place to start.
  • (4/5)
    The subtitle is "an introduction to the practice of meditation." That's a bit misleading. This is a lot more than a value-free manual. The introduction tells us this the main text was originally a long letter from Thich Nhat Hanh to a fellow Buddhist monk in Vietnam in the midst of the war in 1975. Hanh, exiled from Vietnam, worked against the war and was nominated by Martin Luther King for the Nobel Peace Prize. Translated into English under his supervision by a friend, you can't sever this from it's Buddhist context. There's a lot about Buddhist philosophy here--even a discussion about such issues at the "naive" depiction of the faith in Hesse's Siddharta. The last chapter consists of a "Selection of Buddhist Sutras" (which I found impenetrable). The writing is lucid, but even though written in deceptively simple language, a lot of the concepts are pretty sophisticated and I think take repeated reading to really understand. Mind you, this isn't an introduction to Buddhism per se. This isn't the place to find an overview of the religion and the focus is on meditation and "mindfulness." Hanh's concept of meditation and mindfulness doesn't necessarily mean what you do in a lotus position while going "ohm." He means by it living in the moment and fully alert even as you drink tea or wash dishes. "Mindfulness frees us of forgetfulness and dispersion and makes it possible to live fully each minute of life." Not that he doesn't see a place for more formal meditation, and he provides several practical exercises, particularly focusing on the breath. "Our breath is the bridge from out body to our mind... it alone is the tool which can bring them both together."My introduction to meditation actually was in the mandatory Religion class in my Catholic high school. I remember feeling silly as we were directed to go "ohm." Later I'd be reintroduced to the practice when I took Yoga classes. I remember feeling frustrated as I was told to clear my mind of all thought--which I thought impossible. So it was interesting and useful that it's not what Hanh directs. He says rather when you have thoughts during meditation, you acknowledge the thought--or feeling. "The essential thing is not to let any feeling or thought arise without recognizing it in mindfulness, like a palace guard who is aware of every face that passes in the front corridor." It's an interesting and useful book if you're curious about meditation and Buddhism, written clearly and succinctly--the main text of the book is only about a hundred pages. Although to get much out of it means reading with mindfulness--repeatedly, slowly, taking notes--and practicing the exercises. And in that regard, I think it does help to do it with others rather than just try to work through the book by yourself.
  • (5/5)
    This is a wonderful little book, with real, applicable examples on how to live more mindfully. Every time I read Which That Hanh, I remember how simple that really is, and how hard we work to make life hard on ourselves. I read this many years ago, but this new gift edition was such a wonderful salve to read in and around the turbulent election and uncertain aftermath. It was originally written during the Vietnam war and it remains relevant and helpful today. Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    My favorite book about meditation technique. Accessible and patient, reading this book calms the mind.