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Going to Pieces without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness

Going to Pieces without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness

Written by Mark Epstein, MD

Narrated by Patrick Lawlor


Going to Pieces without Falling Apart: A Buddhist Perspective on Wholeness

Written by Mark Epstein, MD

Narrated by Patrick Lawlor

ratings:
4/5 (22 ratings)
Length:
5 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 17, 2015
ISBN:
9781494579531
Format:
Audiobook

Description

Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart shows us that happiness doesn't come from any kind of acquisitiveness, be it material or psychological. Happiness comes from letting go. Weaving together the accumulated wisdom of his two worlds-Buddhism and Western psychotherapy-Mark Epstein shows how "the happiness that we seek depends on our ability to balance the ego's need to do with our inherent capacity to be." He encourages us to relax the ever-vigilant mind in order to experience the freedom that comes only from relinquishing control.




Drawing on events in Epstein's own life and stories from his patients, Going to Pieces Without Falling Apart teaches us that only by letting go can we start on the path to a more peaceful and spiritually satisfying life.
Publisher:
Released:
Feb 17, 2015
ISBN:
9781494579531
Format:
Audiobook


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What people think about Going to Pieces without Falling Apart

3.9
22 ratings / 5 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (3/5)
    Genuinely not sure what to make of this - it seems simultaneously very slight and incredibly profound. Good to be reminded that meditation/spiritual traditions are useful tools. Interesting synthesis of psychoanalytic theory and mindfulness/Buddhism- and the ‘pain comes from your own defences’ feels like a useful lesson. But feel like I’ve missed a lot in it, perhaps.
  • (2/5)
    As someone that has failed time and again at psychotherapy and someone who has recently been studying Buddhism, I figured this was the perfect book for me to transition into a new mindset. About this, I was wrong.When it comes to the Buddhist side of the spectrum, nothing was mentioned in this book that couldn't be found in a beginner's guide or "Buddhism for Dummies". Alongside this basic knowledge was enough psychobabble to make me put the book down for weeks at a time, uninspiring as it was. I have no doubt that Epstein has become enlightened in the ways he makes mention of, but the tactics and analysis he used do not come across clear in this book, and are not at all helpful.
  • (2/5)
    As someone that has failed time and again at psychotherapy and someone who has recently been studying Buddhism, I figured this was the perfect book for me to transition into a new mindset. About this, I was wrong.When it comes to the Buddhist side of the spectrum, nothing was mentioned in this book that couldn't be found in a beginner's guide or "Buddhism for Dummies". Alongside this basic knowledge was enough psychobabble to make me put the book down for weeks at a time, uninspiring as it was. I have no doubt that Epstein has become enlightened in the ways he makes mention of, but the tactics and analysis he used do not come across clear in this book, and are not at all helpful.
  • (3/5)
    Interesting narrative by a psychiatrist, comparing Buddhism with psychotherapy .
  • (4/5)
    Epstein combines the perspectives of psychological development as presented by D. W. Winnicott and the perspectives of Buddhism. I learned a lot.