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Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things

Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things

Written by Jenny Lawson

Narrated by Jenny Lawson


Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things

Written by Jenny Lawson

Narrated by Jenny Lawson

ratings:
4.5/5 (192 ratings)
Length:
8 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Sep 22, 2015
ISBN:
9781427264794
Format:
Audiobook

Description

In Furiously Happy, #1 New York Times bestselling author Jenny Lawson explores her lifelong battle with mental illness. A hysterical, ridiculous book about crippling depression and anxiety? That sounds like a terrible idea.

But terrible ideas are what Jenny does best.

As Jenny says:

"Some people might think that being 'furiously happy' is just an excuse to be stupid and irresponsible and invite a herd of kangaroos over to your house without telling your husband first because you suspect he would say no since he's never particularly liked kangaroos. And that would be ridiculous because no one would invite a herd of kangaroos into their house. Two is the limit. I speak from personal experience. My husband says that none is the new limit. I say he should have been clearer about that before I rented all those kangaroos.

"Most of my favorite people are dangerously fucked-up but you'd never guess because we've learned to bare it so honestly that it becomes the new normal. Like John Hughes wrote in The Breakfast Club, 'We're all pretty bizarre. Some of us are just better at hiding it.' Except go back and cross out the word 'hiding.'"

Furiously Happy is about "taking those moments when things are fine and making them amazing, because those moments are what make us who we are, and they're the same moments we take into battle with us when our brains declare war on our very existence. It's the difference between "surviving life" and "living life". It's the difference between "taking a shower" and "teaching your monkey butler how to shampoo your hair." It's the difference between being "sane" and being "furiously happy."

Lawson is beloved around the world for her inimitable humor and honesty, and in Furiously Happy, she is at her snort-inducing funniest. This is a book about embracing everything that makes us who we are—the beautiful and the flawed—and then using it to find joy in fantastic and outrageous ways. Because as Jenny's mom says, "Maybe 'crazy' isn't so bad after all." Sometimes crazy is just right.

Publisher:
Released:
Sep 22, 2015
ISBN:
9781427264794
Format:
Audiobook


About the author

Jenny Lawson is an award-winning humorist known for her great candor in sharing her struggle with mental illness. She lives in Texas with her husband and daughter and was constantly “buying too many books” (“Not a real thing,” she insists), so she decided to skip the middleman and just started her own bookshop, which also serves booze because books and booze are what magic is made of. She has previously written Let’s Pretend This Never Happened and Furiously Happy, both of which were #1 New York Times bestsellers. She also wrote You Are Here, which inexplicably made it onto the New York Times bestseller list in spite of the fact that it was basically a very fun coloring book. She would like to be your friend unless you’re a real asshole. And yes, she realizes that this whole paragraph is precisely the reason she shouldn’t be allowed to write her own bio.

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Reviews

What people think about Furiously Happy

4.3
192 ratings / 93 Reviews
What did you think?
Rating: 0 out of 5 stars

Reader reviews

  • (5/5)
    Fantastic book. The author is hilarious, poignant, insightful and extremely entertaining. I will read this again, not because I missed anything, but because I want to laugh out loud again at all the things I laughed out loud at the first time.
  • (4/5)
    This book is exactly what you'd expect from Jenny Lawson. Quirky, bizarre, and funny. However, it is all those things in exactly the way you'd expect it. This is a problem I've always had with comedy, comedies, and comedians. It loses its edge for me quickly. So yes, I laughed, but not as hard and not as often. And yes, she said some encouraging and insightful things. I think she's still as good as she ever was, but I'm more used to it now.
  • (5/5)
    I love Jenny. So much. I started this book in December when I went to her book signing. It took me six months to read it because in the middle, I hit a depressive bout so awful that I couldn't even focus on reading for fun. I made it through my two courses, and I functioned enough on a day-to-day basis, but my one real hobby was impossible to touch. This weekend, I finished two books that I started back then. Jenny's book really reminded me that going through all of this was okay. Now it's time to get back to being Furiously Happy. Thanks, Jenny. If you deal with mental illness or know people that do, I highly recommend both of Jenny's books for insight and understanding and a whole bunch of laughter (and some tears).
  • (4/5)
    Jenny reads out loud many short pieces - many of them super goofy, many of them touching. She's got her own bizarre sense of humor and a great imagination. I had a lovely time listening to her.
  • (3/5)
    Some true laugh out loud moments, but also a lot of rambling and stream of consciousness. I definitely enjoyed this, but at times her rambling did get excessive. The parts about the taxidermy were the best!
  • (5/5)
    My mom and I listened to this book as we road tripped to my grandpa's house. In a time of stress and worry it was the perfect fix. Constantly giggling and finding relief in another persons insane but relatable life.

  • (4/5)
    I listened to the audiobook, which I suspect is better than reading it in print. The parts pertaining to mental illness are stellar. The many, many quirky and bizarre rants and stories however get a little old. Many of them sound like things I'd say or do, so if you're not of the quirky and bizarre tribe it might be way too much. I think you'll quickly figure out whether you love or hate the author though.
  • (5/5)
    First book, that I can remember, that made laugh out loud multiple times, say "yes! Yes, exactly!" and feel like this person gets it. Ironically, part way through the book, I had a bout of semi-regular depression that made turning the pages a momentous event and the funny parts receive little more an internal chuckle. Such is life! It's weird! It's comforting! It's random! It is just a wonderful read!
  • (5/5)
    I so enjoyed this book! The author was very good at discussing dealing with mental illness while not making this a depressing book. I laughed so hard while reading this book and plan to read it again.
  • (5/5)
    In Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things, Jenny Lawson uses “furiously happy” as a weapon to counter mental illness, and intends to “destroy the goddamn universe with my irrational joy and I will spew forth pictures of clumsy kittens and baby puppies adopted by raccoons and MOTHERFUCKING NEWBORN LLAMAS DIPPED IN GLITTER AND THE BLOOD OF SEXY VAMPIRES.” This is my kind of gal, someone who doesn’t let depression stop her from embracing her quirkiness and finding humour in the world around her.Some chapters talk specifically about mental illness, but the majority are funny anecdotes. The book is jam-packed with all kinds of critters ranging from living to taxidermied to costumes, including Rory the scary as hell taxidermied raccoon on the front cover. There are also random observational rants, e.g. about female clothes not having pockets, and a pocketbook being neither pocket nor book. She talked about being bewildered by a Japanese computerized toilet, leaving me wanting to shout me too soul-sister!She challenges some of the stigma around mental illness and its treatment. She sarcastically observed that if someone’s cancer returned, “it’s probably just a reaction to too much gluten or not praying correctly. Right?” And then there was the gem about dealing with medication side effects “which can include ‘feeling excessively stabby’ when coupled with some asshole telling you that ‘your medication not working is just proof you don’t really need medication at all.'”You know those silent moments that crop up every so often when you’re seeing your therapist? Jenny knows how to fills those awkward silences with panache, with such observations as: “Is it normal to regret not making a sex tape when you were younger and your boobs still pointed vaguely at the ceiling when you were on your back? Because I feel like no one ever talks about that.”She points out that seemingly having it all doesn’t mean not being depressed of anxious. She admitted that “I only have a few days a month where I actually feel like I was good at life… The other days I feel like I’m barely accomplishing the minimum or that I’m a loser.”I don’t usually rely quite so heavily on quotes when writing reviews, but Jenny’s words are far funnier than mine, and I wanted to share some of my favourites. This book is laugh out loud hilarious, and a delightfully sneaky way of attacking stigma without being primarily about mental health. You will read more about taxidermy than you could ever imagined, and you might even be tempted to get your very own taxidermied armadillo purse (yup, that’s a real thing, Google it).
  • (5/5)
    I have never laughed out loud as much with any other book than I have with this. Even though Lawson does that valley girl thing with her voice that my husband hates, she is the perfect narrator for her memoir. Every story rings true, even if I think some might be exaggerated. The end was a tad somber, but luckily the audio book had a bonus chapter to end on a higher note.
  • (4/5)
    It's well....furiously happy, and funny!
  • (5/5)
    Do you remember that commercial for Broadway from the 80s where the woman said 'I laughed, I cried, it was better than Cats!'

    God, I hope you do. Well, that's how I feel about this book. Now, granted, I actually hated the musical Cats, and walked out at intermission, so in theory that phrase wouldn't be high praise. But I'm choosing to think that Cats means cats, as in kitty cats, as in my favorite animals. And even with that major adjustment, the phrase STILL applies to how I feel about this book.

    That's right, this book is better than kittens. I laughed, and I cried, and damn if I'm not seriously considering "It might be easier. But it wouldn't be better." for my next tattoo.

    I listened to Ms. Lawson read her first book "Let's Pretend this Never Happened" a couple of years ago, and loved it. I hadn't known of The Bloggess before the book, but I subscribed to her blog immediately upon finishing it. I follow her on twitter, and am continually impressed by the way she supports people she's never met. Her 'Depression Lies' ... campaign? I don't even know what to call it, but I know that it has helped and continues to help people.

    This book is lovely. It is laugh-out loud funny - I had to read the felted vagina section out loud to my husband, because, I mean, come on - and painfully honest. It's over 300 pages long and yet still ended too soon. I want to keep the book because I know I'll enjoy reading it again, but I also want to give it to everyone else to read. But then she won't get the money from the sale. What to do...

    Surprise, friends! You're all getting Furiously Happy for the holidays
  • (5/5)
    To start, this is probably the best book I've read this year, or even this century.Jenny Lawson is a humor blogger who has used her platform to speak openly and honestly about living with mental illness. As someone else who lives with the struggles of severe mental health issues, it served as quite a validation. I can relate very much to Jenny's feelings of not being able to get out of bed and feeling like a failure for not accomplishing the same things as "normal people." While I agree with her that everyone's mental illness is different, it was nice to see that I'm not alone. In fact, I'm in pretty good company.Jenny's perspective made the discussion a lot more palatable. Mental health is a serious issue, but talking about it in a serious tone is just depressing, and that's the last thing depressed people need is to be more depressed about having depression. Her stories are uproariously hilarious. I even found myself trying to squash a guffaw, as I was reading in public, which I managed to stifle into a mere chuckle that still collected some stares.From being introduced Rory I and Rory II and their late night cat rodeos to Jenny's absurd arguments with her husband about cat lamination, there wasn't a single sentence in this book that I didn't adore, even the few heartwarming, tear-jerker moments. Honestly, the only reason I wanted to finish this book quickly was to get online and review it. (Also to order my own copy and her first book, Let's Pretend This Never Happened, since I borrowed this book from a friend.)Overall, I absolutely, positively loved this book and would pass out copies to strangers on the street if I had that kind of money.
  • (4/5)
    Wacky, funny, and blunt, Jenny Lawson (aka The Bloggess) discusses everything from her Australia trip to her passion for unusual taxidermy in this book. I deeply appreciate how she lays everything out there about mental illness. Her definition of depression is one of the best I have ever encountered: "Depression is like . . . when you don't want to eat cheese anymore. Even though it's cheese."A particular bit about a taxidermy bear for her 18th anniversary caused me to hand the book over to my husband, as our own 18th anniversary is coming up. He immediately started laughing then looked up. "Wow, she gets attacked by inanimate objects just like you!" To which I said, "Yeah, um, I might I have some things in common with the author." I will be encouraging him to read the full book next.
  • (3/5)
    Enjoyable, quick read. Not as funny as her first book.
  • (5/5)
    I clearly need a list and/or stack of books for when the crazy gets too loud and I can't remember how to cope, so I can put this book on/in it.
  • (4/5)
    My take is quite similar to my friend Linda's on this book. Ms. Lawson puts into words, a lot of the fears, humor, and wacky thoughts that many people with mental health issues have, and it's amazing, and hilarious. Sometimes, it's very difficult to follow though, there are odd tangents, and some thoughts that seem to spiral into nowhere, or very abrupt ends. Overall, she brings to light a lot of topics that are normally hidden away, and she shows them with honesty, humor, and some semblance of normalcy. I recommend giving this a read, there are ups and downs, but on the whole, it's a funny book, and worth the time.
  • (5/5)
    A very funny book about mental illness. Lawson has piles of issues but she seems to have a pretty good handle on life in general, and what she can and cannot deal with. Memoirs about mental health can be very painful to read, but Lawson keeps it light. Even the serious points come across with a dose of humor, which probably helps drive the point home even better. It helps that she has some very weird hobbies, like collecting bizarre taxidermy or wearing a koala onesie to visit koalas. She is, in the end, very charming and incredibly funny. This book, despite (or perhaps because of?) being about crippling depression and anxiety, has more than its fair share of laugh-out-loud moments. Definitely recommended, as long as you don't have issues with foul language.
  • (5/5)
    This is the second book by Jenny Lawson, aka The Bloggess, following up on Let's Pretend This Never Happened. I'd maybe recommend reading that one first, although it's not really necessary, just because it introduces a lot of things about her life that are alluded to in this one, and also because it's freakin' awesome. This volume, like the first one, contains some hilarious anecdotes from the author's life, often involving taxidermied animals and/or surreal arguments with her husband. It also contains some much more serious thoughts about her daily struggles with a host of mental and physical ailments, including chronic anxiety, bouts of depression, and an autoimmune disorder, and how she gets through through the dark times those things inevitably bring with them. More often than not, it's both of those things at at once, thus completely justifying the "funny book about horrible things" subtitle. I have no idea no how she manages that, but it's marvelous. This book made me laugh out loud multiple times. It made me tear up a little once. And it gave me some actually really good advice about not judging yourself too hard. Mostly, through the whole thing, I just kept thinking that Jenny Lawson's brain may be a horrible jerk that keeps trying to kill her, but her mind is a goddamn delight.
  • (4/5)
    The title does not mislead. I listened to audio book- read by the author and thoroughly enjoyed it. Her struggles with mental illness are very real and very horrible- but her narrative is hilarious and well thought out.
  • (4/5)
    Jenny Lawson is an incredibly humorous, gifted writer and if you've ever struggled with any kind of mental illness, this book can be a balm to the soul. She honestly describes her daily struggles, but often in ways that one can't help but laughing out loud as the story unfolds. Her honest and unapologetic voice is exactly what I needed to hear and I just may need to find her other books!
  • (4/5)
    Hilariously funny and serious at the same time. If you know someone with serious mental illness or are someone with serious mental illness this may be just the book to give you hope, and it may help lighten your load a bit at the same time. Lawson can be quite crude at times, but if you can look past that, you will likely dissolve into a fit of deep belly laughs as you read it.
  • (4/5)
    Funny, like expected. Once again, Jenny's rendition of Victor's responses to her are my favorite part of her books. I paid a little bit more attention to how she narrates this book and it is flawless. All the pauses between certain words and the periods where she rushes through other phases, makes the listen perfect. I can't say enough that this is a book that should be listened to. And while this is a book about depression and anxiety, it's not a "self-help" book. it doesn't even give much advice for. Instead it's a place to come and feel included if you share some of what Jenny goes through. It's definitely a book that has united a community of like-minded introverts that normally wouldn't have come together. Recommended if you struggle with anxiety or depression.
  • (2/5)
    This was meant to be a funny book, and it is, but this simply isn't my kind of humor. I imagine lots of people laughing, distracting themselves from reality. This is more of a personal memoir than a mental health book as it was categorized at my local library. I feel misled.
  • (5/5)
    Hilarious and at some points very real, but I didn't find that her mental illness was the driving force behind this memoir. The most memorable parts were the quirky things she thinks about, her cats, her relationship with her husband, and taxidermy.PopSugar Reading Challenge 2017 Advanced Task 7: Book with an eccentric character (taxidermied raccoon cat rodeo)
  • (4/5)
    I am sure I would have appreciated this book more if I were a follower of Lawson's blog. As it is, I came in cold, and it is an odd set of juxtapositions indeed.It's very funny in parts. It's also disjointed, so the funny is often preceded or followed by very serious issues indeed, and I got something of a whiplash effect from that pacing. It's closer pacing in a book than it'd be on a blog, where essays are separated by time rather than a page or 2.In short, while I am not sure who is the target audience here, I am reasonably confident I am not a part of it.
  • (5/5)
    Loved this book!!! Everything about this book was awesome from the cover to the title and every word inside. One of the best survival skills for those with anxiety and depression disorders is humor. Face it some of our anxieties, although very real to us, are quite ridiculous once we truly examine them. This book helps us laugh at ourselves through sharing some real situations. For those who live with someone who has one of these disorders this book will give you a glimpse into how our minds work. Those in the dregs of depression will identify with the author's experiences and understand that they too can survive these episodes. One chapter describes anxiety so precisely that I plan on having friends and relatives read it so they can perhaps garner a better understanding of the way my own mind works.
  • (4/5)
    4 stars. Jenny Lawson is definitely a very funny person. This book is a breath of fresh air because she is so honest, candid, and authentic. She is very self aware and uses it to her advantage by talking the reader through her thinking process. Her logic is bizarre but is also believable - which sometimes makes me wonder if I'm crazy too. But in the end, we're all a bit crazy and bizarre. It's just most of us have the mechanisms in place to reach more reasonable conclusions or refrain from acting on bizarre notions...(or we don't admit it). Anyway, I had many LOL moments while reading this book. But I also gained some understanding of what goes through the minds of those with mental illnesses. That's what I love about this book. Lawson is able to convey the serious content without making it overwhelming, insulting, and a guilt trip for those who are "normal".
  • (4/5)
    I really, really, really loved Lawson's first book, so of course I was excited when I saw that she had a second one coming out. Still, I stubbornly made myself hold out for the paperback. (I only have so much shelf space, okay? Every millimeter counts!) When my husband handed me a gift card to spend at the bookstore for Valentine's Day, I spent ages wandering around trying to figure out how to best maximize its value, but when I saw this in paperback, part of my decision was instantly made.

    Those coming to this book expecting a repeat of Let's Pretend This Never Happened may be surprised by this volume, which definitely includes lots of Lawson's wacky and hilarious stories, but also gets really real about her struggles with mental illness. This honesty definitely gives a different feel to her zany adventures. But in a good way. It will probably also give you a new appreciation for therapists, twitter, and taxidermy.

    The kind of book you'll want to read aloud to everyone around you, but makes it very difficult because you'll be laughing too hard.

    Wonderful.